Violin randomly doubling notes

December 7, 2022, 4:11 PM · I'm so confused - this shouldn't be physically possible according to my understanding, but it is happening.

My student's violin, when she plays either open A or Bb on the A string (and occasionally other notes on A string), is somehow doubling the note an octave lower.

I tried playing the Bb on her violin and got the same thing. It's definitely not that her bow is playing 2 strings; the violin is spontaneously doubling itself.

How??? Does anyone know what's wrong?

Replies (10)

December 7, 2022, 6:27 PM · I have no idea why that is happening. It has never happened to me. It seems to me that your best bet is to go to your luthier and get a professional opinion from someone expert who can actually test the instrument. There may be some problem with the setup. Someone else on this site with more experience may be better able to opine on this. Good luck!
December 7, 2022, 6:51 PM · Try tapping the top and back around the edges - it could happen with a glue failure. When these things happen they might result in a frequency related vibration - it has happened to one or two of my instruments.
December 8, 2022, 2:00 AM · It's likely that something loose on or in the violin is buzzing at these frequencies. This could be about 50 different things. Some are easy to find, and others can be quite difficult. A good and experienced luthier should be able to track it down with the violin in hand.
Edited: December 11, 2022, 3:26 AM ·

Uneven fingerboard???

December 11, 2022, 12:01 PM · Ditto on what David says- the whole source of the well known "wolf notes" is an over resonance at a particular frequency and this can have many possible physical sources. This is not necessarily a wolf note, but could be a similar idea. Definitely have it looked at.
December 14, 2022, 9:11 PM · We had one of these and it turned out to be a bad string - Frayed G.
December 14, 2022, 9:11 PM · We had one of these and it turned out to be a bad string - Frayed G.
December 15, 2022, 8:24 AM · @Sylvia - people have suggested a number of possible explanations, but, the bottom line, including from luthier David Burgess, is have your luthier look at it. Get thee to a luthier!
December 15, 2022, 10:01 AM · Make sure no fine tuners on the tailpiece are over-extended and touching the top of the violin.
December 15, 2022, 12:26 PM ·
Tom, hopefully the "luthier" will really know what they are doing, as apposed to being a scammer. I wish I could vouch for everyone who claims to be a lutheir or a "master", but so far, I am unable to do so.

This discussion has been archived and is no longer accepting responses.

Facebook Twitter YouTube Instagram Email

Violinist.com is made possible by...

Shar Music
Shar Music: Protect your instrument this winter

Pirastro Strings
Pirastro Strings

JR Judd Violins
JR Judd Violins

Starling-DeLay Symposium
Starling-DeLay Symposium

Los Angeles Philharmonic
LA Phil

Dimitri Musafia, Master Maker of Violin and Viola Cases
Dimitri Musafia, Master Maker of Violin and Viola Cases

Violinist.com Shopping Guide
Violinist.com Shopping Guide

ARIA International Summer Academy

Study with the Elizabeth Faidley Studio

Metzler Violin Shop

Southwest Strings

Bobelock Cases

Johnson String Instrument/Carriage House Violins

Jargar Strings

Bay Fine Strings Violin Shop

FiddlerShop

Fiddlerman.com

Los Angeles Violin Shop

Baerenreiter

String Masters

Nazareth Gevorkian Violins

Laurie's Books

Discover the best of Violinist.com in these collections of editor Laurie Niles' exclusive interviews.

Violinist.com Interviews Volume 1
Violinist.com Interviews Volume 1, with introduction by Hilary Hahn

Violinist.com Interviews Volume 2
Violinist.com Interviews Volume 2, with introduction by Rachel Barton Pine

Subscribe