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Rehearsal times

Edited: August 14, 2022, 4:20 AM · I have a problem. I am a morning person, after a good breakfast and perhaps a small workoutI can generally conquer the universe and play and practice anything with good concentration .
Now I am in a string group and no-one wants to practice/rehearse in the morning, there preference is mid/late afternoon. After lunch I am just putty and lose my concentration altogether. I there is a concert the same day I am just about exhausted by the 8.00pm concert start and end up running on adrenaline and a miserable type of playing reserve. This is particularly bad in very hot weather.
On a concert day if they insist on PM practicing does this mean just staying in bed until 12.00am and starting my day then?
Do any of my co-conspirators on this site have any practical advice for this dilemma? And also time management for performing?? Thank you.

Replies (9)

August 14, 2022, 6:49 AM · Owls vs. Larks. This is one human "problem" that probably dates back to the discovery of how to make and contain fire. Like David, I'm at my best in the morning. Before retirement I was always the first person at school or work. I still awake before sunrise and consider those morning hours the best part of the day.

Yet, society demands participation later in the day into the evening. The Larks are struggling to stay awake while the Owls are just finding their stride.

Recreational activities have to bow to employment demands and that puts music lessons and practice into weekends and evenings. Finding other Larks with a schedule that accommodates morning rehearsals will be next-to-impossible.

I've adapted making my play/practice time to mid afternoon as I "wind down" for the day. That makes me play solo all the time. Where can we find other musicians who can adjust their schedules to playing and rehearsing during the daylight hours?

Even in retirement I've found that the Owls still own the schedule. I've tried the local "Senior Residences" only to run into the administrators who maintain that those kinds of activities are for the evening.

I play solo, mid afternoons. I have a few students who can accommodate mid-day lessons weekdays or weekends. I realize that the Owls have won.

August 14, 2022, 6:49 AM · Owls vs. Larks. This is one human "problem" that probably dates back to the discovery of how to make and contain fire. Like David, I'm at my best in the morning. Before retirement I was always the first person at school or work. I still awake before sunrise and consider those morning hours the best part of the day.

Yet, society demands participation later in the day into the evening. The Larks are struggling to stay awake while the Owls are just finding their stride.

Recreational activities have to bow to employment demands and that puts music lessons and practice into weekends and evenings. Finding other Larks with a schedule that accommodates morning rehearsals will be next-to-impossible.

I've adapted making my play/practice time to mid afternoon as I "wind down" for the day. That makes me play solo all the time. Where can we find other musicians who can adjust their schedules to playing and rehearsing during the daylight hours?

Even in retirement I've found that the Owls still own the schedule. I've tried the local "Senior Residences" only to run into the administrators who maintain that those kinds of activities are for the evening.

I play solo, mid afternoons. I have a few students who can accommodate mid-day lessons weekdays or weekends. I realize that the Owls have won.

August 14, 2022, 7:57 AM · I think you mean 12pm as 12am is at midnight...
Edited: August 14, 2022, 8:06 AM · That doesn't sound like "morning person", that sounds like "poor sleep and / or diet". When I was younger and ate way too much sugar I also had a huge crash after lunch which made school difficult. Do you eat well?
August 14, 2022, 1:04 PM · Most of the performing professional musicians of my acquaintance are night owls, generally tending to wake at 10 am or later.

I agree with Cotton that a likely culprit for you is your lunch. Try a lunch lower in carbohydrates; this should prevent you from feeling so sluggish.

Also consider the benefits of a mid-day nap.

August 14, 2022, 1:15 PM · Yes, a human problem. Nice sympathy and good advice.

One aspect of this kind of problem is you're faced with a kind of "all-or-nothing" response. That is, either you jump in late in the day and do a full concert or practice session, or nothing good will happen.

So, try this. Pick up your violin at 8:00 p.m. (or whenever it's a problem) and play something at your very best for 3 minutes. If you can't do it for 3 minutes, how can you play a whole concert?

But doing this, once a day, on a regular basis, may provide an opportunity to see what, specifically, are the problems and possible remedies for playing so late in the day, without having to play a complete program to help figure it out.

Hope that helps.

Edited: August 14, 2022, 6:19 PM · When it comes to music the owls dominate, it is true. It is worth pointing out that being a lark rather than an owl is certainly better for almost all careers.

It is the owls that are generally seen as lazy asses when they can't get going strong at 8 am.

August 15, 2022, 2:38 AM · Thanks everyone for the helpful comments, and the Larks vs the Owls scenario…….I would like to slightly recast my original question and ask if anyone has a preferred regime for a concert day in terms of arranging the day to optimize playing later in the day. I am thinking more of a really demanding chamber concert rather than an orchestral gig, say a difficult quintet. I think most Larks can handle most orchestra gigs
August 15, 2022, 2:48 AM · Thanks everyone for the helpful comments, and the Larks vs the Owls scenario…….I would like to slightly recast my original question and ask if anyone has a preferred regime for a concert day in terms of arranging the day to optimize playing later in the day. I am thinking more of a really demanding chamber concert rather than an orchestral gig, say a difficult quintet. I think most Larks can handle most orchestra gigs

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