Galamian Three Octaves Arpeggios Fingering

November 18, 2021, 10:18 AM · I can not find any video demonstration online for the galamian 3 octave arpeggios, there is only scale demonstration on YouTube. I just want to check the fingerings my daughter use is correct. Anyone could help with just the first two bars of G Major arpeggios?

Replies (11)

November 18, 2021, 10:41 AM · The "S" stands for shift

3 octaves
Root position
020S 131S 1314

1st inversion
021S 132S 1324

2nd inversion
031S 142S 1424

Diminished 7th
0241S 1342S 13424

Dominant 7th
0202S 1313S 13134

4 octaves
Root position
020S 131S 131S 1234

1st inversion
021S 132S 132S 1234

2nd inversion
031S 142S 142S 1234

Diminished 7th
0241S 1342S 1342S 1234-4

Dominant 7th
0202S 1313S 1313S 1234-4

November 18, 2021, 12:22 PM · Wow thanks so much Christian, appreciate the swift reply!
November 18, 2021, 12:33 PM · May I trouble you to take a look at this one? I don’t know the official terminology of this set in English so I have to post a photo here (link as follows). I feel my daughter did not get it right but not sure which note.

https://ibb.co/rknLkYx

Edited: November 18, 2021, 1:27 PM · So this is a fingering for the first inversion. My fingerings assume that you are heading up and down with the same fingering. This one uses my fingering on the way up, and then on the way down has a single shift into first position, rather than shifting twice like I play.

This one looks fine, even if it's not what I tend to practice for G, but part of that reason is that I tend to practice G as 4 octaves - It can be quite comfortable to reduce the number of shifts, but the shift is bigger (so there are pros and cons of each) - I use this sort of fingering for arpeggios in certain other keys. I will say that if I'm doing this kind of thing, I personally prefer to do the big shift on the e string than the d string, but someone more thoughtful than I will have to give you their thoughts why that might or might not be the BEST thing.

If you wanted the complete set of arpeggios with this style of fingering, they'd be as follows (I'm not going to give you the formula for shifting on the e string, because I found that it requires going up with a different fingering for some of the arpeggios, so this stuff can get complicated):

3 octaves
Root position
up:020S 131S 1314
down shift on d string:413 1S31 302 0

1st inversion
up:021S 132S 1324
down shift on d string:413 1S41 312 0

2nd inversion
up:031S 142S 1424
down shift on d string:424 1S42 313 0

Diminished 7th
up:0241S 1342S 13424
down shift on d string:4243 1S424 3142 0

Dominant 7th
up:0202S 1313S 13134
down shift on d string: it is a mystery....hahahaha

One drawback that you may notice is that in this system, shifts sometimes come in the middle of the arpeggio, which can really break up the musical line. Also, while the fingering for the diminished 7th I gave is possible, though a little awkward, there really isn't a good fingering for the dominant 7th going down - Instead, you'd need to make the shift on the e string.

I might recommend sticking with the simple "up" fingering I've given, and just go down the same way, rather than the image you just posted, but it's not bad to try different things. She can always spend her time on weird fingerings and other disordered behavior once she has gotten really comfy with the simplest fingering.

The best thing to do is to consult with the teacher and follow the teacher's advice before you follow anyone on the internet's advice.

November 18, 2021, 2:30 PM · Impressive lists from Christian. After standardizing my three octave scales, I have been trying for a long time to find a systematic approach for the arpeggios, without success. I think it depends a lot on whether the player prefers shifting or stretching, has a long or short 4th finger., prefers going up early on the A string or saving all the high notes for the E string. I try to avoid that second inversion, 1-4-2 going up. For the dim 7th arpeggio high on the E string I like the spread out pattern 1-2-3-4 . The fingering going down can be different than going up; dive down to 3rd position or even 1st. To that standard sequence of chords I add: Augmented, suspended 4th, Maj 7, Maj6, min3maj7, min3,7, min3,6, half-diminished(=b5,7) and allP4 (=4,7).
November 18, 2021, 9:06 PM · Isn't all of this in some kind of book?
Edited: November 18, 2021, 9:59 PM · The arpeggio sequence is in the Carl Flesch book (ex. no. 5 for each key), the Galamian/Neumann scale book, as well as Barbara Barber's well-organized version (Scales for Advanced Violinists).

It's worth noting that some of the common published fingerings aren't always the best for every player, depending on variations in the size of their hand, length of their fingers, and quality of shifting. There are some things that are just a given (shifting on the A then on the E instead of twice on the same string for G major), whereas things like using 3rd or 4th finger on the top of the scale can be very dependent on the player's physical makeup.

November 19, 2021, 9:53 AM · Then there's Simon Fischer's book which also has three-octave scales with fingerings, and he's got the augmented arpeggio too. About the "other" arpeggios, personally I feel that the diminished arpeggio is extremely important but often students do not practice it. If you ever want to play jazz on your violin you need to work on diminished arpeggios and octatonic scales (alternating whole-steps and half-steps) as these require a lot of short shifts of the kind that you use a lot when improvising.
November 19, 2021, 10:29 AM · Christian thanks so much for the detailed explanation. This helps a lot for a parent who never learns violin but wants to help the child. Our teacher is not always available to answer to this kind of question and I don’t want to wait until next lesson before continue practicing this arpeggio hence seeking advice here??
November 19, 2021, 10:42 AM · Another book that has the sequence of arpeggios (and scales), with fingerings, is Sevcik, Op.1, part 3, #s 1--8.


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