Tartini Solo violin sonatas

Edited: October 12, 2021, 1:12 PM · Does anyone know where I can get the score to the Tartini Solo Violin Piccolo Sonatas? I could only find the manuscripts on IMSLP.

Thanks!

Replies (10)

Edited: October 12, 2021, 5:51 PM · That's a good question. I can't find them either, except for the Devil's Trill, of course. Shar also has a double-sonata (two violins and continuo). I'm curious to see what others find.

In the meantime, please know that the manuscripts really are the best because if it's slightly illegible or unintelligible, then the additional frustration that you endure are good for your soul. You're meant to feel the expressiveness of the composer through the wild meanderings of his quill. Any effort by an editor to clean things up, publish the pieces in standard notation, and -- gasp -- add tasteful markings such as fingerings, bowings, or dynamics (to say nothing of piano accompaniments), is, for lack of a better word, sacrilege. Well, that's what people say about Bach solo sonatas, so I assume it's true for Tartini too.

October 12, 2021, 7:18 PM · Amelia -
I know they were published by G. Zanibon (Padova)
They have a website (although it is in Italian) at:
https://www.zanibon.it/Entrata.htm
Maybe you could contact them to see if it would still be available.
Paul
October 12, 2021, 8:08 PM · The "Cerca nel catalogo" at Zanibon was very easy to use, I typed in "Tartini Sonatas" and found these offerings:

No. 3829, 6 sonate (op. V) dall'edizione antica per violino e basso continuo. A cura di Bonelli, E25
No. 5715, 12 sonate (op. II, Cleton) per violino e basso, vol. I. A cura di Castagnone e Guglielmo, E39
No. 5716, 12 sonate (op. II, Cleton) per violino e basso, vol. II. A cura di Castagnone e Guglielmo, E39

October 12, 2021, 8:17 PM · I believe what Amelia is looking for is:
No. 5106 - Tartini, Giuseppe (1692-1770)-26 piccole sonate per violino e violoncello e per violino solo, vol. 2.
14 sonate per violino solo. Edizione critica di Giovanni Guglielmo. € 25,00
This is the edition that I have, so it must still be available.
Paul
October 13, 2021, 5:01 AM · An editor on IMSLP has uploaded a few modern editions. https://imslp.org/wiki/Category:Tuttle,_Marshall
However, I do recommended engaging with the original Tartini hand document that you mentioned. Only the last few sonatas are illegible (they have been reconstructed by the first complete recording by Peter Sheppard Skaerved).
October 13, 2021, 5:33 AM · Manuscript here https://imslp.org/wiki/26_Violin_Sonatas_(Tartini%2C_Giuseppe)
October 20, 2021, 9:23 AM · Lev Ginsburg wrote a great biography of Tartini called "Tartini: His Life and Times". In it, there are all of his solo sonatas, many cadenzas, and I believe most or all of his "Art of Bowing".

Available on ebay here:
https://www.ebay.com/p/2908632.

Also available on discoverbooks.com here:
https://www.discoverbooks.com/Tartini-His-Life-and-Times-Lev-Ginsburg-Hardcov-p/0876665903.htm

October 20, 2021, 11:20 AM · What is the argument that any of these sonatas are actually intended to be solo works? I looked at the manuscript of the 26 sonatas. It begins very legibly* with pieces on two staffs for the violin and the bass line (the bass is never figured, Tartini trusted the "accompanist" to figure out on the fly). Somewhere along the sonatas are noted without a bass line, on every second staff. In other words he didn't have time (or motivation) to write down the bass line; I don't think they are MEANT to be without accompaniment. Finally the very last piece, almost completely illegible and quite possibly incomplete, is written on consecutive staves, leaving no space for a bass line. So this one MIGHT be intended as a solo piece but it seems more likely that the way it is spaced is due to the haste in which it is very obviously written.

So I just wonder: How do we know they are indeed intended to be "without bass"?

October 20, 2021, 3:20 PM · Tartini letter to Algarotti February 24th 1750 'My little sonatas for solo violin have a bass part for convention's sake. I play them without bass and this is my true intention'. This applies to the picccole sonatas which the OP mentioned, but you could infer it to the other sonatas as well.
October 20, 2021, 11:45 PM · This might explain why the bass lines are so simple compared to Handel's or Vivaldi's.


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