Approaches to Studying Recorded Musical Performanc

Edited: May 13, 2021, 1:44 PM · I just came upon this on-line "book" that may be of interest to some of our members:

https://charm.rhul.ac.uk/studies/chapters/intro.html

It has an extensive chapter on violin and one on piano.
I have not read it all yet, but it came up as I was searching for some references on vibrato.

Replies (5)

May 19, 2021, 1:20 PM · The link didn't work for me. Can it be made so I can click it?
Edited: May 19, 2021, 10:50 PM · Sorry - it still works for me. I don't know how to do "that." I just highlight and copy the URL and paste it in my browser search line.

THIS IS THE CHAPTER SPECIFICALLY FOR VIOLIN:
https://charm.rhul.ac.uk/studies/chapters/chap5.html

Edited: May 20, 2021, 2:48 AM · Thanks Andrew, that looks like an impressive piece of work and I'll enjoy reading it.
May 20, 2021, 3:55 AM · That's a great read Mr. Victor.
Edited: May 20, 2021, 7:44 AM · Not bad, Prof Leech-Wilkinson, but a bit underwhelming I thought. The take-home message seems to be that over the last 100 or so years violin performance styles, as defined by depth and speed of vibrato and measures of portamento in recordings of the Beethoven and Brahms concertos, haven't changed as much as we might have assumed.

I'm somewhat reminded of Claudia Fritz's attempts to place assessment and comparison of violin tone on a scientific footing. The methodology seems to be as sound as it can be, given the inescapable fact that none of the factors affecting musical expression and evaluation can be fully controlled. Here we also have the additional complication that this is a retrospective rather than a prospective study and 100-year-old recordings are likely to be far less faithful than recent ones. Neither scientist is guilty of overinterpreting their results (although I do have reservations about Prof Leech-Wilkinson's arbitrary regression lines that could have been drawn quite differently) but I'm not convinced that their findings really justify the amount of time and listening strain they must have entailed.

But studies in which the findings are a bit foggy and uncertain are the ones most likely to generate plenty of discussion, so take it away!

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