Mozart Sonata

Edited: April 6, 2021, 10:01 PM · My daughter has been asked to learn a movement from a Mozart Sonata for a camp she is attending this summer. She's learned Mozart Concerti 3 and 5 previously.
Any suggestions for a first Sonata movement?

Replies (21)

April 6, 2021, 10:13 PM · I love K. 301. Beautiful, elegant, not terribly difficult so it is a showcase for purity in intonation and musicianship.

https://youtu.be/DynH6tqWXOQ

April 7, 2021, 12:20 AM · I agree with Mary Ellen. Another posibility is Mozart K304
Edited: April 7, 2021, 12:54 AM · Shoot, somebody already suggested K304.

Here's a great album of Mozart Sonatas for you to listen to and choose from: https://open.spotify.com/album/3sN7Lymz3Hc5sq51NXjghh?si=jKR3IlvsRm6g5mPI6lVgZw

Edit: Sorry, your daughter.

April 7, 2021, 3:26 AM · Another recommendation for E minor - K304!
Edited: April 7, 2021, 7:25 AM · Well, if she can play M3 and M5 then she should not have difficulty with any of the sonatas, I wouldn't think. Everyone does K304 because it's regarded to be the easiest. I agree with Mary Ellen that K301 is a better showcase of Mozart's cheerful character -- pure springtime! I love the K378 too but that one starts with the melody in the piano. If it were not a summer-camp situation (where the pianist will likely be a staff "accompanist") then I would argue that the choice of sonata is a decision that should be made mutually with the pianist.
April 7, 2021, 7:38 AM · Thanks for suggestions. This is online camp so don't know what they will do in reference to piano.
Thanks, I will have her listen.
April 7, 2021, 8:01 AM · Any versions, publishers?
April 7, 2021, 8:36 AM · Any sort of urtext, Henle Verlag/Baerenreiter
April 7, 2021, 10:02 AM · I like K303 as a starting point. I have both the Flesch and the Francescatti editions, and Francescatti's is playable, but full of totally idiosyncratic fingerings and bowings. Flesch is a bit more normal.
April 7, 2021, 10:51 AM · I have the Henle and it's very good.
April 7, 2021, 10:54 AM · Thanks everyone!!
April 7, 2021, 2:03 PM · How about a slow movement? A piano playing friend once made me sightread the andante from K. 529. It is almost unbelievably wonderful (the whole sonata is great if maybe a little dominated by the piano in the last movement).
April 7, 2021, 2:59 PM · Albrecht - K. 529 is Des Kleinen Friedrichs Geburtstag (voice). Were you sight-singing that???

April 7, 2021, 3:38 PM · Greetings?
it’s interesting that Christian mentioned the Francisca tea addition. I bought it because I admired the player and wanted to see his fingerings. However, it is basically unusable, not because of Francisca’s ideas but because the piano part is the most ridiculous top-heavy romantic realisation one could imagine. So it is worth remembering thatThe piano part is A fundamental factor when choosing what edition to buy,
Cheers,
Buri
April 7, 2021, 4:01 PM · I agree with K301 and K304 as good starting points as above. Although relatively simple, K304 is a real masterpiece of the genre. It's the first piece he wrote after hearing the death of his mother, and this is arguably reflected in the music (it's the only minor key piano and violin sonata). The early sonatas (K6 type numbers) are surprisingly difficult and very hard to put together quickly. Barenreiter for editions.
April 7, 2021, 4:16 PM · I know that Schnabel did the piano part of the Flesch edition, but I'm not sure who did the piano part in the Francescatti edition (I took a quick glance at some point and was under the impression that the piano parts were the same, but alas, I don't have both piano parts with me to compare). I would think Schnabel would do a tasteful and restrained job of editing.
April 7, 2021, 4:48 PM · Hi Christian,
actually , in my opinion, the Schanbel is a complete disaster. Its thick, top heavy and out of sync with trying to create a tasteful partnership. Fortunately, the first time I used it was with a very experienced professional accompanist who could rearrange and edit while reading. Others may not be so lucky! Not saying he wasn’t one the of the greatest pianists of all time though.
Cheers,
Buri
April 7, 2021, 6:33 PM · There is really nothing wrong with Mozart's original piano part. One more reason for Bärenreiter or Henle (I always prefer Henle when those 2 are available; they are very well typeset and comfortable to read).
Edited: April 7, 2021, 8:17 PM · All this about editions of the piano parts surprises me. Are Mozart's originals that ambiguous? I'm confessing total ignorance in this area.
April 7, 2021, 8:19 PM · I third Mozart K. 301. It really is lovely and very accessible. We ended up buying the whole set of Henle Mozart sonatas. Expensive, but worth it.
April 7, 2021, 9:22 PM · Sorry, Andrew; the one I meant is K. 526 (in A, the slow movement in D).


Facebook Twitter YouTube Instagram Email

Violinist.com is made possible by...

Shar Music
Shar Music

Yamaha Silent Violin
Yamaha Silent Violin

Juilliard Starling-DeLay Symposium on Violin Studies
Juilliard Starling-DeLay Symposium on Violin Studies

Pirastro Strings
Pirastro Strings

Corilon Violins
Corilon Violins

Find a Summer Music Program
Find a Summer Music Program

Dimitri Musafia, Master Maker of Violin and Viola Cases
Dimitri Musafia, Master Maker of Violin and Viola Cases

Violinist.com Business Directory
Violinist.com Business Directory

Violinist.com Guide to Online Learning
Violinist.com Guide to Online Learning

Dominant Pro Strings

Antonio Strad Violin

Bay Fine Strings Violin Shop

Bobelock Cases

Fiddlerman.com

Fiddlershop

Los Angeles Violin Shop

Nazareth Gevorkian Violins

Violin-Strings.com

Metzler Violin Shop

Leatherwood Bespoke Rosin

Warchal

Barenreiter

Johnson String Instrument and Carriage House Violins

Potter Violins

String Masters

Bein & Company

Annapolis Bows & Violins

Laurie's Books

Discover the best of Violinist.com in these collections of editor Laurie Niles' exclusive interviews.

Violinist.com Interviews Volume 1
Violinist.com Interviews Volume 1, with introduction by Hilary Hahn

Violinist.com Interviews Volume 2
Violinist.com Interviews Volume 2, with introduction by Rachel Barton Pine

Subscribe