Gold E String For Sweaty Hands

Edited: March 11, 2021, 11:49 AM · I moved to synthetic strings last year after playing on metal strings for years. I found that the E string often rusts after 2 to 4 weeks of playing it, especially on the occasion that I don't play for a couple of days. I heard that gold E strings are less likely to be vulnerable to corrosion and rusting. Are gold E strings significantly resistant to corrosion and rusting than regular E strings? Aside from that, how else is a gold E string different from a regular one in terms of sound, playability, and responsiveness?

My options are Evah Pirazzi Gold E and Goldbrokat 24K E. How do they differ and how do they affect the overall sound of the other strings?

Edit: I have Thomastik-Infeld Visions on my violin right now.

Replies (9)

March 11, 2021, 11:30 AM · I have not used the Goldbrokat gold plated E, but if you must use gold plated Es and are on a budget, use the Goldbrokats. All the gold plated Es differ a bit in tone, but have a characteristic tonal palette that also tends to "enhance" the tonal brilliance of the other strings. My favorite Gold Plated Es are the Oliv, and the Larsen-have used others, but way too many years ago. I did use the EP gold plated E a lot in the past, but forgot its tone (I was a different player as well.) It is different than the Oliv-supposedly brighter (though the Oliv is quite brilliant itself.)

The problem with Pirastro/Larsen/Thomastik-Infeld gold plated Es is the price, especially Thomastik-Infeld (those are good too, though.) If you sweat a lot, none will survive for long, so I still suggest the Goldbrokats for economical reasons-they should still have a beautiful tone. If price is of no consequence, try the Larsen and Oliv Es (they are not identical.)

Goldbrokat and Prim also do make strings that are supposedly immune to corrosion, but I have not used them. Perhaps Pirastro has one as well.

Happy practicing.

March 11, 2021, 11:49 AM · Thank you! The price difference between the EP and the Goldbrokat here are negligible so it doesn't matter to me. I also forgot to mention that I'm using Thomastik-Infeld Visions right now. I'll include that in the main post.
Edited: March 11, 2021, 1:17 PM · In that case, I would go for the Pirastro just because I know it's a reliable, bright gold plated E. The Goldbrokat may be better or worse, but I just do not know it (of course I know the regular goldbrokat.) Perhaps order one of each?

(If you can get the Larsen, I would consider it. It's great-brilliant, clear, light under the fingers, and makes your instrument quite resonant. But the EP E should be good enough, and likely to be super powerful as well.)

March 11, 2021, 3:57 PM · I too burn through E strings through corrosion. I've found that the single most corrosion-resistant string for me is the platinum PI E string, but it's $40.

However, the Warchal Amber E also lasts for me, and works well on my violin. You may find that other stainless steel strings work for you.

March 11, 2021, 10:43 PM · Gold plated E strings tend to be a little warmer in sound than plain steel E strings. Pirastro makes a gold-plated E for the Evah Pirazzi and Obligato lines, and Thomastik and Goldbrokat have versions as well.

The downside to this type of E is that it is more prone to whistling.

March 12, 2021, 7:09 AM · Gold Plated E strings sooner or later loose their plating,especially with players that have sweaty hands. Have you thought about trying stainless steel Es? They do not corrode/rust and have a wonderful sound, I can personally recommend trying the Warchal Ametyst E (same tension as the Pirastro Oliv E).
Edited: March 12, 2021, 8:10 AM · Worry not, my fellow ruster: there are strings made specifically for people like us!

The stainless Lisa E is a good choice, as is the Warchal Amber E (I didn't even know it was a stainless alloy until I tried it, the Amber, but it is).

The platings on gold E strings wear very quickly. Before long you're left with a slightly dirty steel E that rusts just as fast as normal. They whistle more, too. I wouldn't recommend them.

Edited: March 12, 2021, 9:15 AM · I just looked into stainless steel E’s and apparently Evah Pirazzi Gold E is made of stainless steel and not gold plated! Perhaps I was just misguided by the name into thinking it was gold plated. Warchal Amber E is more expensive here so the EP it is. I’m not playing live music anyway, just practicing at home during quarantine. I’m just looking for a long lasting E string that wont’t rust every now and then. Warchal Amber E seems to be a favorite here, I guess I’ll have to try it when things normalize. Thank you all so much! Happy practicing!
March 12, 2021, 9:43 AM · Sounds like the EP is ideal, especially if it is not expensive.

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