Stradivarius: the brand

October 18, 2020, 7:49 AM · What do you think of the Stradivarius name being used to sell clothing? Is it effective?

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stradivarius_(clothing_brand)

Replies (41)

October 18, 2020, 7:52 AM · I think its a ploy for potential imbaciles. People might see it and think "oh strads a respectable name, so this will be good" where in actual fact could be biggest garbage going
October 18, 2020, 8:17 AM · Looking at their web-site my opinion is "MEH!" Nothing outstanding, unusual or musical. Just your typical "me-too" clothing of the day. Kind of bland.

Would have been a good "brand" for clothing designed for the string player and other classical performance attire.

Edited: October 18, 2020, 4:31 PM · Clothes that are so old they are threadbare; that have been rebuilt tens of times, with chips dents and innumerable flaws - and that people pay millions for, essentially, just the name.

If only the customers knew....

October 18, 2020, 12:04 PM · Elise maybe the Shroud of Turin would fill that bill?
October 18, 2020, 1:22 PM · One of the great vinyl cartridges is made by Van den Hul called the " Stradivarius XGW".It retails at $7500.00 CDN.Sorry Paul it doesnt have glowing tubes on it...
October 18, 2020, 4:32 PM · Paul - yes indeed, considering its also a fake!
October 18, 2020, 4:41 PM · Wow, vinyl cartridge. That sounds interesting!
October 18, 2020, 5:26 PM · The cartridge is made from Hawaiian koa wood.Sorry for the careless use of adjectives...
October 18, 2020, 6:14 PM · How much does one have to pay for the speakers that make this all worthwhile?
October 18, 2020, 6:21 PM · La Pavoni have a “Stradivari” espresso machine in their line-up. It makes excellent coffee...

Cheers Carlo

Edited: October 18, 2020, 7:56 PM · So true Andrew.You also need a tonearm of equal quality to the cartridge, then the correspondingly good turntable etc.
If I had that cartridge I would love a set of Revel Ultima2 speakers.Just dreamin'...
Edited: October 18, 2020, 6:52 PM · I found a Stradivarius selection wine from Bulgaria price at 7.15 Euros. It looks the name has value to a diverse array of products at different pricing points. Perhaps it adds an imprimatur of quality and craftsmanship.
October 18, 2020, 9:10 PM · Oh no, Peter, don't get me started on $20,000 tonearms. That hi-fi stuff is insane. Every thread on that is a total rabbit hole.

Here in the US, we all know what "brand" is more famous than Stradivarius, especially when it comes to fraud.

October 18, 2020, 9:12 PM · Must be the self-styled-intellectual equivalent to the "Trump" brand.
October 19, 2020, 6:14 AM · In the documentary “highly strung” which is about high end antique violins and the people who play or own them, there is (to me, at least) a rather disturbing segment about a very flashy family of New York violinists, who are trying to market the brand Stradivari to a wider audience .
Edited: October 19, 2020, 7:46 AM · I don't really understand why you want musicians to talk about a clothing brand... and why you are posting it in a violin forum. The only point in common is just the brand name, which happens to be just a latinized italian surname, probably chosen after Antonio Stradivari, hence the music logo.

So... I don't know what do you want to read or what do you expect from us musicians about that brand.

"What do you think of the Stradivarius name being used to sell clothing?"
Nothing? Why should I care or have an opinion about the name a clothing company gave to one brand?

"Is it effective?"
Why musicians would have knowledge about that question/answer?
Ask the company CEO and associates if it's effective, we don't know.

May be you ask this because since it's named "stradivarius", we musicians love that name and know what it means and we would buy their stuff?

Hewl no, only a dumb musician would buy their clothes just because "it says Stradivarius", but that's because of the dumbness, not because of the musician part. It's literally just a brand name, there's nothing else in common with music, just the brand name, no violin strings are used to make those clothes, nothing. There's absolutely no nexus between music and that brand, so you can't even touch the sensible musician nerve. I've checked their website and there's not even music logo inspired clothing, so to a musician it is just another clothing brand.

Edited: October 19, 2020, 7:50 AM · Antonia Stradivari, the only discendant of the great maker (excepting her son), filed suit against a real estate agent in Cremona who called his business "Stradivari Realty." She won.

If anyone plans to capitalize on the Stradivari surname by association alone they'd better watch out.

Edited: October 19, 2020, 7:30 PM · Dimitri raises a good point. California also can't sell wines that are called Burgundy or Bordeaux or Champagne either. They might be allowed to say "California Champagne."

Paul N, I believe this thread falls under the category of "it's just a bit of fun." The question is a valid one -- whether a term that's well known in the violin world is a sufficiently "household" name generally to help sell merchandise. And, it could be. But as you found, maybe the company is not really using the brand to its maximum advantage. Well there's no vaccine for stupid.

October 19, 2020, 9:40 AM · Paul, the name "Stardivarius" is known far outside the music community. When I've taken a fake Stradivari I own (which is both a good fake and also has a good facsimile label) into almost any venue, including a truck stop, people were all over it.

But a cheap factory German violin with a Strad label, which I also own, has also done as well in some or many of these venues.

October 19, 2020, 9:59 AM · Just ribbing you Paul.I think we've beaten that subject to death now.
October 20, 2020, 10:18 AM · No, my point is that the OP expects something from musicians, violinists in particular. That's why he created this thread in a violinist forum. And all I'm saying is that he won't get any special answers from musicians, because that brand is everything but music. So, we, musicians, can't add anything special or anything of value about that brand.

He seems to think that there's something musical about that brand, if not, why would you post something about a clothing brand in a music forum?

I was simply saying that no, there's nothing musical about that brand except the name and the logo, that's it.

He is basically asking NBA players what do they think about this French soda company named "Jordan", which logo is a basket. Makes no sense.

October 20, 2020, 10:51 AM · I never understood why they named jeans after a French anthropologist.
Edited: October 21, 2020, 3:54 AM · Wow. Mexico has 48 Stradivarius clothing stores. China has 49. The US has none. I wonder why? Some kind of a trademark issue in the US?
Edited: October 21, 2020, 5:06 AM · The reason why there are no Stradivarius stores in the US is because Tarisio filed a court injunction. They didn't want to be forced to list Stradivarius underwear in their auctions.
October 21, 2020, 5:51 AM · The Op quite possibly asked in this forum because this is the forum they belong to, so why not.
He may well have asked in his ( for example) geologists forum also, but they would likely have been utterly mystified by the question.
And musicians are more likely to have an opinion on it, so why not?

October 21, 2020, 7:36 AM · Dimitri, that makes sense. I can see how it would hurt the average auction price of a Stradivarius. ;-)
Edited: October 21, 2020, 10:15 AM · "Dimitri, that makes sense. I can see how it would hurt the average auction price of a Stradivarius. ;-)"

What, you think they can't make $20M golden braided Strad undies with diamonds?
You really don't know the fashion industry...

"The OP quite possibly asked in this forum because this is the forum they belong to, so why not"
You are missing the big point: there's absolutely no correlation/nexus/point in common between music, musicians or violins and the Stradivarius clothing company. None, just the name and the logo. So, no, makes no sense to ask that question here.

I will repeat the same example: it's like asking NBA players what do they think about this French soda company which is called "Jordan" and has a basket logo. Wow, they play basketball, professionally, so they must have an opinion about that soda company, right? Right? Because it has a basket and it says "Jordan", right?

No, of course not. Don't be ridiculous. I don't mind the off-topic, but I do mind the assumption that if a brand is called after a musician or luthier, then luthiers and musicians must have an opinion and interest about that brand, even if that brand has absolutely no nexus between the 2 worlds, as exactly in this case.

October 21, 2020, 10:42 AM · I'd like some purfled purple underpants.
October 21, 2020, 12:36 PM · To wear with your Nehru jacket, Gordon?
Edited: October 21, 2020, 9:45 PM · I think there is a connection. The clothing company is named after a existing "brand" that has been held in the highest esteem for a long time.

In 1971, the Lady Blunt Strad sold for a record price of 84,000 GBP; in 2010, it sold again for another record price of 10,000,000 GBP. With the exception perhaps of some works of art, not too many investments have earned that type of return in 40 years.

Anything that costs 10,000,000 GBP (or 84,000 GBP for that matter) could safely be considered a luxury item by the average consumer - and some consumers may think that Stradivarius jeans by extension are a luxury item too - luxury within reach perhaps.

Is my inquiry appropriate for musicians? I think so. Musicians buy violins, jeans, espresso, wine, and real estate And there may be an obsession with brand names at this time, driven by an aspiration to live the life of the well-to-do. When I read literature from the 1920's - say D.H Lawrence's Lady Chatterley's Lover to give a random example - there isn't any discussion on what brand of scarfs and shoes Constance Chatterley wore; we're simply told she only consorted with the flannel-trousered Cambridge intransigeants. What you wore then was more important than the brand you were wearing.


October 22, 2020, 3:26 AM · Now if they were *original* Strad undies from the 18th century, AND had a Hill certificate or equivalent, that might me worth considering.
Edited: October 22, 2020, 6:33 AM · Would you accept patches on the worn-through bits?
Edited: October 22, 2020, 7:40 AM · "I think there is a connection"
Oh... key?
It's just that there isn't, but lets hear the explanation just because.

"The clothing company is named after an existing "brand" that has been held in the highest esteem for a long time"
Yeah, but not, Stradivarius is not a brand, or a "brand", it's the name of an instrument made by Antonio Stradivari, or one of the family Stradivari, or one of their shop workers, or probably a mix of them all. You can't say "Stradivarius" is a brand as in Ferrari or Rolex, because it died when Antonio died. Brands are infinite, they die if they go bankruptcy, not because the founder died.

"In 1971, the Lady Blunt Strad sold for a record price of 84,000 GBP; in 2010, it sold again for another record price of 10,000,000 GBP. With the exception perhaps of some works of art, not too many investments have earned that type of return in 40 years.
Anything that costs 10,000,000 GBP (or 84,000 GBP for that matter) could safely be considered a luxury item by the average consumer"
Yeah, bla bla bla, strads are expensive, surprise, still no connection mentioned.

" - and some consumers may think that Stradivarius jeans by extension are a luxury item too - luxury within reach perhaps."
OK... I agree, some DUMB customers, important adjetive there, may think that since the brand is named Stradivarius, and since they have read in the news that there are these violins called "Stradivarius" that are worth millions, hence... the clothes are... a luxury? are good? are worth millions?

I'm not gonna comment on that negative IQ logic.

It is NOT a real actual brand like Ferrari collaborating with a clothing brand like Levi's, where what you just said can be applied:
"OK, these Levi's jeans are called "Enzo Ferrari" and have the official Ferrari logo printed on them, it's a collaboration. Since Ferrari is a luxury brand, I bet these jeans are worth thousands of dollars and they are very good quality"
That's a fine example of your point. But, hey, don't forget, still it would be terribly dumb to ask Lewis Hamilton what's his opinion about these jeans.

Again, I can't think of a better example: ask LeBron James about this French soda company called "Jordan" with a basket logo. Do you think he has anything to say about it? Of course not

There's absolutely no connection between musicians, violins, violinists or luthiers and the clothing brand. Even if the founder were Perlman, still, zero. There's nothing special a violinist has to say about that clothing brand, as a violinist I mean.

"Musicians buy violins, jeans, espresso, wine, and real estate and there may be an obsession with brand names at this time, driven by an aspiration to live the life of the well-to-do"
Yeah, see? You are treating musicians like dumbs, that's my point. That we would buy clothes based on the name of the brand. Oh, it says Stradivarius, I'm gonna buy the whole store. This is like a narrated meme joke video about violinists, but you seem to believe it.

- Hey, Perlman, nice jeans, where did you buy them?
+ Yeah, well, the brand is called "Stradivarius", so... yeah :)

- Hey uncle John, on which violin are you working right now? By the way, I went to the hardware store and bought you these "Mozart" screwdriver set.
+ Oh... honey, these are made in China. These are like really bad.
- BuT iT sAyS MOZART???!!!

Oh, none of the girls that I know that buy clothes from that brand is a musician. And I haven't seen any of my teachers or musician friends wear any Stradivarius clothes, or mention it out loud. It's like... they know it has nothing to do with it. Unbelievable.

Edited: October 22, 2020, 2:18 PM · Paul, lots of people buy status symbols merely from what the tradition of a name implies. Does a Rolex watch (excuse me, a Rolex "timepiece") actually keep better time than a Timex?

On the other hand, I might buy a piece of Stradivarius clothing just as a novelty or a humorous conversation piece, as long as the name was conspicuously displayed. I know a few musicians who might do that too.

Edited: October 22, 2020, 9:02 AM · Buying Stradivarius clothing ain't so bad.
It's when you buy a Tommy Hilfiger violin that you've got problems.

Bugger, my latest violin's label actually says "United Colours of Breton"

Edited: October 22, 2020, 12:04 PM · David, I agree, many people buy Rolex because it says Rolex, and the brand represents luxury items. It happens with every brand in the world.

This is NOT at all what's going on here, the clothing brand inherits absolutely nothing from Antonio Stradivari. There's no relation at all, 2 separate worlds, 2 completely different businesses, zero common ground. How many times do I have to say it?

It's not that the Stradivarius clothing brand was founded by the grand-grand-daughter of Antonio and she knows she must make the best clothes of the world. No, not at all, and even if that was the case... what on heavens a music teacher, a professional violinist, a conductor or a luthier has to say about that clothing brand?
What kind of knowledge or sense did they develop to talk or even care about a clothing brand?

None, that's why I'm saying I don't know why on earth you would ask this to musicians. If a girl/woman says something relevant here, it will definitely not be because she is a violinist or a musician, but because she knows a lot about clothing or she tried some stuff and can give you a little review. So... ask this question in a fashion forum if you want serious or relevant answers.

What bugs me, said it from the beginning, is that he seems to acknowledge that since we are musicians, that know what a Stradivarius is, and the brand is called Stradivarius, hence... hence something, I still don't know what is it that we musicians must know or care about.

Apple

So... Barenboim, what are your thoughts on these apples?
- Excuse me?
Well, you performed Mozart last week here in Germany, the apple brand is Mozart, so... you must have something to say about it, right?
- *Proceeds to walk away with his mind blown*

Edited: October 22, 2020, 7:14 PM · Paul wrote:
"what on heavens a music teacher, a professional violinist, a conductor or a luthier has to say about that clothing brand?"
_______________________

I don't know... I've commented from the perspective of having been a teacher, a professional violinist, and having also made a fiddle or two. :-)

But I have never been a conductor, so I guess that part hasn't been adequately fleshed out yet. ;-)

October 22, 2020, 4:36 PM · I don’t know why this bothers you so much Paul - you made your point several pages ago.
There is no connection between this clothing and a line of very famous valuable old violins.
So why did they put a treble clef in the logo ? I’ll bet they were capitalising on name association, even if at the subliminal level .
The New Yorkers I referred to earlier were absolutely planning to capitalise on the reputation of the violins for marketing purposes. I’m not sure how far they went with it. I imagine Antonia would have had a case against them.
Edited: October 23, 2020, 7:42 AM · @Paul N, having taught marketing I can say this in two words: brand recognition. You'd be surprised how many non-musicians have heard of Stradivarius, that guy who makes multi-million dollar fiddles. I spoke to a Harvard grad student once who asked me, "if those violins are so great, why don't they make them any more?" LOL
Edited: October 23, 2020, 8:44 AM · It may be an urban myth, but I heard that a Hollywood movie executive , during discussions about making a movie of Romeo and Juliet, asked “Do they both have to die?”
Edited: October 24, 2020, 5:37 AM · ...indeed. Spielberg had a big argument with Peter Benchley, author of "Jaws", because he wanted the shark to win and eat up Manhattan.


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