Can bows for intermediate violinists be used for more advanced techniques

October 7, 2020, 5:47 AM · Hello,

This is my first post.


I am a beginner violinist and have been playing for 7 months, I have been teaching myself violin up to now and I have recently purchased a Codabow Diamond NX because the cheap bows, which I am used to were holding me back. However, I am really happy with my new bow but I am curious to know if this new Codabow will be suitable for learning more advanced techniques, which I hope to learn in the future such as detache and matele etc etc...

Although I have only been playing violin for a very short time, I have only learnt to bow stacato and slur so far and I am deliberately stopping myself from learning any advanced bowing techniques at this present time until I have completely mastered the basics first.

I am working through Suzuki book 2, and Wolfahrt Opus 45 book 1


Replies (8)

October 7, 2020, 6:19 AM · Welcome Mrs. Earley

I think that the purchase of Coda Diamond bow was a wise decision and should make for enjoyable playing even 20 years from now. What I like about carbon fiber bows is that they are virtually indestructible and you get a lot for your investment. This is a great bow and will allow you to practice any of the different types of bowing that you want to learn.

October 7, 2020, 7:16 AM · As far as Coda goes, the Diamond Series will play and function most like a real bow out of all the carbon fiber options out there. You should be able to learn all of the advanced bowing techniques. But like with any bow, each one has it's own strengths and weaknesses, some techniques will be easier and some harder. But the Coda should work fine! I share quite a bit more about my thought on carbon fiber bows here: https://adbowsllc.com/2019/01/30/carbon-fiber-bows/
Edited: October 7, 2020, 7:31 AM · Your CodaBow will be fine for any kind of violin playing.
October 7, 2020, 11:46 AM · A Coda will serve you well, definitely through all the Suzuki books and likely beyond. Both my kids have Codabows. It's the main bow for my younger one, who is notoriously hard on bows. She is able to do a great spiccato with it and even some ricochet. My more advanced older one uses it as a backup bow. He can do all the strokes on it, but it is more challenging to use and not quite as clean sounding as his wood bow.
October 7, 2020, 11:46 AM · A Coda will serve you well, definitely through all the Suzuki books and likely beyond. Both my kids have Codabows. It's the main bow for my younger one, who is notoriously hard on bows. She is able to do a great spiccato with it and even some ricochet. My more advanced older one uses it as a backup bow. He can do all the strokes on it, but it is more challenging to use and not quite as clean sounding as his wood bow.
October 7, 2020, 12:28 PM · Among the techniques you explicitly names, a CodaBow will be more than sufficient. Assuming you're an adult beginner, given the repertoire and performance trajectory of most adult beginners, my guess is that there will never be a real pressing need to replace your bow with something.

If your objective is just to be able to play well, and you're not performance tuning your setup for conservatory/professional auditions and performance a nice carbon fiber will last you well past the advanced concerto repertoire.

October 8, 2020, 1:54 PM · Yes. I have never owned an expensive bow, and the only technique I cannot do is that pesky on-the-string down-bow staccato. A bow still needs to match your violin. Factors like weight, balance, bounce, flexibility, are more important than price.
October 9, 2020, 8:41 AM · Like others have said, the Coda Diamond NX should be able to do any stroke. I’ve played several and I would be completely willing to use one for gigs (I don’t own one because I have several other good bows). I didn’t find the sound quality amazing on my violin, but technique wise it shouldn’t hold you back.


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