Obtaining a good sound

August 1, 2020, 2:10 PM · I asked this the other day but I think my post was probably a bit too rambling so deleted it in order to re-ask the question.

I know there are many factors that go into getting a good sound - bow, bowing parallel to the bridge, right/left hand coordination, finger pressure, etc. I've read the previous posts on this topic, and it's interesting in that everyone has a different take on this in the past.

So I am curious - what is/was your main takeaways when focusing on getting that good sound?

Replies (6)

August 1, 2020, 2:25 PM · Practicing scales and focusing on tone, different contact point for different types of sound, changing bow tilt, relaxing hand so it moves with the stroke.... it’s so nuanced and I’m not sure how one would develop a good tone through anything else but practice.
August 1, 2020, 2:36 PM · I practice a lot, and focus on what my teacher suggests. I've just been focusing on this search for a consistent good sound more and more as other things that used to be difficult no longer are.
Edited: August 1, 2020, 2:42 PM · I agree with Xuanyuan. Planning your bow division thoughtfully is also an important element. A relaxed vibrato is sort of the final element once your right hand is tamed.

There's a lot to be said for playing a lot of lyrical stuff and keeping your focus on the sound. It's also something that you can keep improving forever (I certainly have a ways to go). I'm convinced that the Rode etudes have really pushed my sound production, as the lyrical sections ask you often to play high up on the G string, which introduces the need for a very precise soundpoint in the bow and a very relaxed, light and fluid left hand.

I believe you are a bit earlier in your journey, so if I had something that I think I could have benefited from focusing on earlier, I think I would have spent more time at the mirror, really trying to draw a relaxed and straight bow. That's really a starting point, since you still need to let your ears dictate your bowing, but I had some bad tendencies that personally needed correcting.

August 1, 2020, 3:40 PM · For me it was becoming thoroughly familiar with the holy trinity: bow speed, bow pressure, soundpoint. You become familiar by first learning the theory (which is quite simple, see Fischer Basics) and then experiment, experiment, experiment.
Edited: August 1, 2020, 9:47 PM · Thanks to all 3 of you, I appreciate the comments! Christian. I am most certainly at an earlier stage of my return to the violin adventure :)

I do spend time at the mirror but I need to spend more. I consider it a good sign that my teacher is starting to focus on my sound, to me that's progress when he brings up new things.


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