Hellier 1679 copy decision

July 25, 2020, 2:55 PM · I would like to buy a Hellier 1679 copy and I'm trying to choose between one made by Scott Cao and another made by Gliga. Both are about the same price. I might be able to try one from Gliga although it would require some travelling but to try the Scott Cao I would have to purchase it and have it shipped to Canada for a 7 day trial. Anyone have any suggestions?

Replies (6)

Edited: July 25, 2020, 3:42 PM · My suggestion is that buying a violin because it has a particular decoration scheme is like putting the cart before the horse. They might sound very nice, but another violin without that decoration might sound better, and there are so many more undecorated instruments to choose from. And good violins are beautiful all by themselves, without the distraction of unnecessary decoration.
July 25, 2020, 4:55 PM · I appreciate the sentiment but I am not buying it just for the decoration. I am looking for one in that price range and I've heard good reviews regarding Gliga and Scott Cao. I wouldn't buy one without trying it but it's pretty difficult considering where I live and current restrictions on travelling. There are a couple of music stores a few hours from here but they won't bring in intermediate models unless you buy them outright. There are so many makes/models to choose from and I can't be going to a lot of places to try some out so I have to start somewhere. I chose the Hellier considering the amount of work involved in producing one. And yes I do like the decoration.
July 25, 2020, 9:26 PM · My old teacher was a big fan of Scott Cao instruments, and I've read that Gligas tend to be on the darker sounding side. Neither of those is first hand experience but that would sway me towards Scott Cao. And I would also love to have a copy of that particular instrument.
July 25, 2020, 9:50 PM · Which level (model number) of Scott Cao are you talking about?
July 26, 2020, 2:30 AM · I do suggest you try the instrument(s) out extensively before deciding.

Inlaid violins usually have thicker ribs than "plain" violins, in order to make up for the structurally-weakening incisions which are made into the wood. This will likely have an effect over the sound quality.


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