New violin varnish is matte?

Edited: April 23, 2020, 6:35 PM · Hi,

A new violin came like this... any ideas?

https://share.icloud.com/photos/00t0gUOK9rDYdGcKAY2qzKkJw

https://share.icloud.com/photos/0PVgoWHaU5R6emnD-wf-CAorw

You can see that there is a like a matte finish, I'm no expert is like if you sand it a bit.

Also it came like this:

https://share.icloud.com/photos/0QamBOtYg92NK1-F420Gn_5OQ

Is this normal? could it be related to heat during shipping?

Thanks,
Damián.

Edit: Corrected/added links

Replies (11)

April 23, 2020, 5:39 PM · Cannot open the link.
April 23, 2020, 5:40 PM · That's not matte. It's just a very pitted glossy varnish. I imagine this happens when a varnish is thinner and more runny, and the maker doesn't bother to polish much between coats. Regardless, not a cause for concern.
April 23, 2020, 5:59 PM · That's the texture of the wood showing through a thin varnish. There's nothing intrinsically wrong with it. It does serve to reveal things about the workmanship, for better or for worse. It is also, of course, a matter of taste.
Edited: April 23, 2020, 6:03 PM · Did you mean to post the same photo twice?
April 23, 2020, 6:38 PM · Sorry seems I copied the same twice, I've added another link to the 1st concern and to the second the correct link.

Is not the texture.. all the rest is shinny and there are bits that are matte, I don't think that's intentional. In the first link the brush straight lines are there and I've never seen anything like that on my cheaper violins.

My concern is that is new, so no reason to be faulty.

Also, there is some black marks on the tailpiece and chin rest: https://share.icloud.com/photos/0_kXMvAIFg79ECm29LIqNEXWg

April 23, 2020, 7:07 PM · Chinrests and tailpieces are accessories that are easily replaced.
In my experience finding a violin for sale that has a chinrest matching one's chin is a miracle. Nevertheless I've seen people struggle to live with such chinress and apply all sorts of covers rather than find their ideal chinrest. To be honest, I was one of those people for the first 30 years that I played violin.
April 23, 2020, 8:32 PM · Without seeing it in person, it looks like it could be a violin with a soft varnish that was placed in a case too soon or maybe became hot inside the case.

If it was a suspension case, are the marks only where the case material on the back was contacting the violin back? Any on top?

April 24, 2020, 2:15 AM · Hello,

According to the seller is part of the antiqued finished. He took pictures of other violins he has which are the same and the strokes indicate that is it is on purpose not giving the last finish in some areas.

Could this be an option?

Edited: April 24, 2020, 3:45 AM · Damian, it looks like the violin has a lot of the natural wood texture showing through. In the second photo (first post), I'm seeing grain lines, not brush marks. This isn't to say that the violin doesn't have brush marks, but that I'm not seeing them in the photo. However, violins aren't necessarily supposed to have a bowling ball finish. ;-)

Regarding the markings on the tailpiece and chinrest: Natural wood is seldom uniform in color, and that's one of the reasons people often prefer it over plastic or paint. It has "personality" and "character".

April 24, 2020, 3:47 PM · While we are on the subject of slight, and generally harmless, oddities in the surface appearance of the violin I'd like to mention that on the back plate of my 18th c violin there is an irregular intermittent black line running virtually the whole length of the plate a short distance from the center line. I have been told this is a watermark in the wood, and although at first glance it may look like a crack it is nothing of the sort and does not seem to affect the integrity of the structure. I have seen no other violins with this watermark in the wood (not that I've looked) so it would seem to be uncommon.
One thing is that in this case it is a unique identifying feature of the instrument.
The link below is a photo of the back plate of the violin showing the watermark. It may help to use the computer's zoom-in function to view it more clearly.
https://www.flickr.com/photos/188138140@N06/shares/r27r65
Edited: April 24, 2020, 7:39 PM · While we are on the subject of slight, and generally harmless, oddities in the surface appearance of the violin I'd like to mention that on the back plate of my 18th c violin there is an irregular intermittent black line running virtually the whole length of the plate a short distance from the center line. I have been told this is a watermark in the wood, and although at first glance it may look like a crack it is nothing of the sort and does not seem to affect the integrity of the structure. I have seen no other violins with this watermark in the wood (not that I've looked) so it would seem to be uncommon.

One useful thing is that in this case it is a unique identifying feature of the violin.

The link below is a photo of the back plate of the violin showing the watermark. It may help to use the computer's zoom-in function to view it more clearly.

https://www.flickr.com/photos/188138140@N06/shares/r27r65

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