Return From Wuhan

Edited: February 4, 2020, 4:47 AM · This piece seeks to capture the fear of the unknown, of not knowing, and the silent terror of an old man returning from Wuhan, evacuated from the virus-stricken city.

https://soundcloud.com/user-155461785/return-from-wuan

Replies (8)

February 4, 2020, 3:13 AM · Obviously.
Edited: February 4, 2020, 1:48 PM · All the "modern music" seems to capture the unkown, of not wknwing" simple because it sounds too random.
Edited: February 4, 2020, 11:25 AM · I wouldn't agree that it sounds random; to my ear it sounds like it has its roots in the Baroque. Perhaps an acceptable piece for inclusion in a recital.
February 4, 2020, 8:15 AM · The piece sounds as though it was written in Musescore and performed by pressing the "play" button thereby engaging the MIDI synthesizers embedded within the software. The work might have a fighting chance in the hands of human players with expressive voices.
February 4, 2020, 11:20 AM · The Irish folk music website thesession.org has about 60 tunes with "return" in the title. One title that caught my eye was "Return From Tchernobyl", composed by Frenchman Michel Ferry, an Irish reel with 10 different names and 11 different settings - about par for the course ;)
February 4, 2020, 11:55 AM · And for every "return from" there's a "crossing to".
Edited: February 4, 2020, 2:22 PM · Trevor, the way the notes are "played" suggest Baroque, the type of "bowing", the absence of expressive dynamics... Not the nonsense meoldy, there's nothing baroque about it. But that is just the sound of some synthesizer.
Edited: February 4, 2020, 2:28 PM · These kinds of things go on all the time. The blind Japanese pianist Nobuyuki Tsujii wrote a simple tune memorializing the victims of the 2011 tsunami. Some folks thought it was beautiful and touching, others said it was trite and worthless. I remember back to the 1980s when pretty much every new painting or sculpture was intended to be some kind of statement about the AIDS epidemic. It's just human nature that we try to interface our talents to what is going on in the world.

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