Chin rest clamp woes

November 19, 2019, 8:28 AM · Anybody ever replace their own chin rest clamp? I think the threads on mine are fubar after 30+ years of use. They loosen every time I play (buzzz) and I can tighten/loosen by hand.

Yeah, I should probably just replace the whole thing, but... I liiiike it. I think it has, legit, conformed to the shape of my neck after all these years.

Thank you.

Replies (7)

Edited: November 19, 2019, 9:23 AM · I have replaced chinrest clamps a number of times - both the "standard" "double" and the Hill style hardware because they stopped making the exact chinrest design I have on 6 instruments by 1970.

For the "double" you have to remove the bottom half that clamps to the back of the violin before removing the rest from the wood. If you have stripped the threads in the wood do not worry, you can glue the new (or old) hardware in - or if the height adjusters have stripped you can probably just replace them and/or the bottom half of the hardware.

Edited: November 19, 2019, 12:17 PM · The difficulty with that endeavor is that there's no standardization for the distance between the threaded barrels that clamp chinrests on, and the thread diameters and pitches too. Add to that the fact that sellers of replacement hardware never give you those dimensions in their product descriptions, at least not in my experience. So the job is absolutely do-able, but taking it to your local shop to have them do it might be the least frustrating course of action.
November 19, 2019, 10:19 AM · Marian,
What exactly is loose--the part of the clap that screws into the chinrest, or the screw connection between top and bottom of the clamp?

I'll bet you can tighten the metal/metal screw connection with either plumber's teflon tape, or liquid Threadlock.
There are a couple of types of Threadlock, red and blue. One is more permanent, but I can't remember which. If you've never used Threadlock, just be aware it's surprisingly runny when it comes out of the bottle.

Edited: November 19, 2019, 10:52 AM · The blue is usually the less permanent, and the red more so.

But chinrest clamp loosening usually has little to do with the metal clamps loosening, and a lot more to do with dimensional changes in the wooden instrument, and compression of the padding surfaces of the chinrest.

November 19, 2019, 11:16 AM · I advise against Threadlock. It will be almost impossible to undo the fasteners once it sets. You will have to cut the clamps to remove the rest. Event the blue lower strength stuff will be too tight. The stuff really works and requires a fair amount of heat to release the grip. Depending on the style of fasteners I would use similar ones from another rest.
November 19, 2019, 11:38 AM · Thank you, everyone. It is the metal on metal threads that are in question. I'll try the bottom half of another old rest - I don't know why I didn't think of that. If it doesn't work I'll probably be taking it to the shop, where I'm due a visit anyway. Thanks again.
November 19, 2019, 7:47 PM · I bought a set of titanium hardware and it's quite good. I wish I had bought the Hill type because I had to drill another hole in my CR for it. You can get them at Fiddlershop. I got mine from Stradpet (direct from China).


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