Preparing for big repertoire(concertos, caprices)

Edited: October 25, 2019, 4:08 PM · Hello ,
I have been realising that I need to improve technique to play big concertos and caprices.
I'm currently playing Mozart 3( 1 mov+ 2 mov for the moment), Schubert sonatinas and my next one is Beethoven's two romances.I' m in sixth violin grade.
I'm learning scales with double stops(octaves, etc...) and I'm on Mazas/Kayser with Hauchard on positions(which is a bit useless because I masterise positions.I too play Schradieck 's studies
I'm looking for arpeggios/fastness improving so I can play more difficult piece.I'm too doing harmonics scales(may sounds weird)
How do you prepare, techincally big concertos (I'd like to play Mendelssohn and Bruch the next 2/3 years and would like to play Schubert rondo in A D 438 the next year)

Waiting for your answers
Practicing...

Replies (6)

October 17, 2019, 4:24 PM · I question what is going on with playing Kayser etudes while playing Mozart 3 or a Beethoven Romance. The point of etudes isn't really in the beauty of the etudes, but rather to bring your playing up. If your etudes are way less difficult than the pieces you are playing, then you aren't getting anything out of the etudes you are playing.

If I were you, I would apply myself to the etudes and try and make some ground up. I don't know if something is up with your teacher or what the case is, but you are likely either not technically equipped for the pieces you are playing, or you are playing etudes that are way too easy for you and unlikely to improve your playing.

It would still be a good idea to do Dont op. 37 before Kreutzer, and it would be a good idea to get to the end of Rode before playing either Mendelssohn or Bruch.

October 17, 2019, 6:47 PM · Come to the big concertos with your technique already formed and solid. Most major concertos have a few tricks that feel semi-unique, or passages that are just weird and not well related to patterns you already have in your brain, but you want to spend your practice time on those bits, not on the mundane stuff.

You learn those works the same as anything else -- preferably slowly, carefully, and meticulously, so everything is fully controlled and you can are able to modify what you want at will.

October 18, 2019, 10:21 AM · Kreutzer etudes, Flesch scales.
October 18, 2019, 10:27 AM · If you want arpeggios, you will love Dounis.
October 18, 2019, 1:05 PM · I read Erin's response quickly and thought she was recommending loving donuts. :)
Edited: October 18, 2019, 2:50 PM · LOL I need donuts after just LOOKING at Dounis... ;-)

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