new violin vibrating - resonance?

May 25, 2019, 7:16 AM · Hello,

I have a question on resonance of violins.

I'm trying out a new violin that vibrates a lot more than others I've tried when playing. Is this what we refer to as resonance? Is this a good thing?

Replies (6)

May 25, 2019, 7:31 AM · Maybe. Is the instrument also louder? At the entry level you can basically measure resonance in decibels.
May 25, 2019, 7:34 AM · Yes - it is louder. I currently have a gliga gems 1 and the violin I am trying as an upgrade is quite a bit louder. It's probably as loud as the others I've tried as well (although I cannot really remember the loudness)
Edited: May 25, 2019, 10:33 AM · Violins typically have "signature modes", or resonances at certain frequencies. A good violin is shown here: http://strad3d.org/demo/st_4.html. Beginner violins are often made thick and heavy, with thick varnish, and as a result might not resonate as well or as evenly, and the frequencies are often higher.
May 25, 2019, 10:39 AM · I assume you are writing because you feel the vibrations. If you are able you should play scales all the way up all of the strings to see if there is a troublesome acoustic resonance. If you have a teacher or experienced violinist friend (even a person in the shop) try to get them to do it for you.

May 25, 2019, 11:38 PM · I read somewhere that there can be such thing as too much resonnance. Like everything there is a balance which is optimally desirable.
Edited: May 26, 2019, 8:20 AM · We probably can't know what you mean by "resonance". Generally, amateurs like a lot of ring, but better players start to figure out that this steals from the projected tone quality Heifetz supposedly said regarding ring that when he wanted his violin to play, he would play it himself--that he didn't want it going on without permission; on the other hand Suzuki promotes the idea of ringing resonances. . . . you choose which you think is a better model. :-)

However, at this point probably the best advice is to buy the instrument that pleases you the most, so that you will enjoy practicing and do it more! If your tastes change, you can always change violins, later.

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