Beware Teachers, Skynet is Coming for Your Jobs

Edited: April 3, 2019, 11:18 AM · Pretty interesting article about a study using machine learning to recognize different bow strokes in a professional musician. It looks like the idea would be to develop "smart" bows or something like that in order to give new students real-time feedback on how their bowing matches up.

https://medicalxpress.com/news/2019-04-artificial-intelligence-enables-violinist-movements.html


The actual paper is included below:

https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fpsyg.2019.00344/full

Replies (8)

April 3, 2019, 1:46 PM · Something like this was done for the cello some years ago. I am very glad to see it being applied to the violin. Software making use of this technology would be tremendously helpful as a supplement to conventional teaching.
April 3, 2019, 7:07 PM · That is really interesting and I think potentially very useful.
April 3, 2019, 8:59 PM · People said computers would destroy chess too.
April 4, 2019, 4:51 AM · "Supplement to conventional teaching " is the key phrase in all this. Whereas machine learning as an adjunct can have a use in some situations (flying simulators come to mind) it can never replace face-to-face tuition between humans where not only techniques are taught but, just as importantly if not more so, the experience of a lifetime is passed down from teacher to student.
April 4, 2019, 6:34 AM · Ideally there is also an AI that provide emotional support, motivation to practice, enrol us to recital/competition.
April 4, 2019, 8:52 AM · For a teacher there is nothing else like being in a room with students just an arm's length away to actually see their muscle action under the skin and working with them to correct what they are doing that hinders their progress.

In my opinion it is not how closely a student simulates some ideal motions but how they achieve them and whether that will be correct for their progress.

I doubt that AI can do that at this time. From what I have seen it is unlikely that it is possible even with good internet lessons like ArtistWorks that have professional human eyes on one for 5 minutes at a time.

April 4, 2019, 11:51 AM · I was just being saucy with the title, in honor of Cotton's superior SEO skills. I just that it sounded like an interesting supplement depending on how they can implement the feedback. I know that there is a grand tradition in western education to try and put total faith in technology to be the next miracle teacher, so I'll be curious if this can result in something truly useful as a supplement to teachers or for self-teachers.
April 4, 2019, 1:51 PM · You can have your golf swing analyzed by a computer too, but I bet that kind of service is very expensive. Not only is the hardware and software a capital expense, but like so many such things, you need an expert *human* to help you interpret what the computer is telling you. I don't expect "machine learning" to be influencing weekly violin lessons anytime soon.

This discussion has been archived and is no longer accepting responses.

Facebook Twitter YouTube Instagram Email

Violinist.com is made possible by...

Shar Music
Shar Music

Yamaha Violin Finder
Yamaha Violin Finder

Pirastro Strings
Pirastro Strings

Dimitri Musafia, Master Maker of Violin and Viola Cases
Dimitri Musafia, Master Maker of Violin and Viola Cases

Pockestra
Pockestra

Los Angeles Philharmonic

Vsound: Electric Violin Pedal

Bay Fine Strings Violin Shop

Bobelock Cases

Fiddlerman.com

Fiddlershop

Los Angeles Violin Shop

Nazareth Gevorkian Violins

Potter Violins

Pro-Am Strings

Violin Lab

Wangbow Violin Bow Workshop

Subscribe