Who is the most prodigious living string teacher?

January 2, 2019, 4:33 AM · Who, in your opinion, has taught the most violin, viola, cello and/or bass students to a high caliber, who is still living? I'd like to know who you think has been the most prolific in their string instrument teaching. One of the reasons this came into my mind to ask is having seen a master class on teaching mini-bass at the German European String Teacher Association national conference and actually I had never even heard of that before.

Replies (16)

January 2, 2019, 8:01 AM · Zakhar Bron
January 2, 2019, 8:37 AM · Zakhar Bron, Don Weilerstein, Paul Kantor, the Vamos come to mind, if the metric is number of students who are soloists and musicians in major chamber ensembles and orchestras?
January 2, 2019, 8:37 AM · Zakhar Bron, Don Weilerstein, Paul Kantor, the Vamos come to mind, if the metric is number of students who are soloists and musicians in major chamber ensembles and orchestras?
January 2, 2019, 10:29 AM · I bet Bron is a really good teacher, but I wonder how much some of these names become a depository for already talented and very well taught students.

I've always wondered who are the teachers that are consistently getting these students to that level, or is my understanding of the whole system not quite fleshed-out?

January 2, 2019, 10:58 AM · Thanks. Maybe there are some additional fabulous ones which have taught many, not necessarily that so many of the students become international prize winners or major orchestra players. Eloise Hellyer, for one, has taught huge numbers of violin students, so has Mimi Zweig.
January 2, 2019, 11:05 AM · "I wonder how much some of these names become a depository for already talented and very well taught students."
If this means what I think it means, James Gallway's autobiography may be relevant - in his days as a student at the Paris conservatoire, he claims the teachers were all old emeritus professors who did no teaching at all except to have each student play a set piece in a group lesson and every student in the group had to play the piece faster than the previous student!
January 2, 2019, 2:08 PM · Ana Chunachenco.
January 2, 2019, 2:12 PM · To be accepted into a major conservatory you already need to have a nearly complete, professional level technique. The real heroes of the teaching profession are the many relatively unknown teachers who take the student from beginner to advanced level, before age 17. What the famous teachers can do is take a concerto performance from ordinary to audition-winning level.
January 2, 2019, 3:45 PM · I think the famous teachers are real heroes too.

Moreover, before they became famous, I don't know if they also needed to take beginner students, search for jobs, garner reputation, etc. like many typical instructors would do?

Don't know if this is generally true, but I think the earlier teachers construct the foundations, while the later ones are the fine tuners, technique-wise.

January 2, 2019, 10:30 PM · Joel that might be true but didn't you say, in another thread, that the last little bit is the hardest? Or was that someone else?
January 3, 2019, 12:06 AM · -Paul, Yes, well put. The last 10% of the project is as hard and as long as the first 90%
Edited: January 3, 2019, 12:10 AM · Talking about teachers of beginners, here is a MImi Zweig video series (beginner to Suzuki Minuet 2). All the lessons. She has such a soothing voice, dont you think?
I do think the real heroes are the beginner-teachers, who teach the very young, because it is so very difficult. And if the foundations go wrong they are so difficult to correct that many give up playing all together instead of choosing hard correction work.

Yes it looks very easy in the video, the kid is a little bit older and is behaving very well probably also due to the fact that they are filming it. The kid clearly has a long attention span, much longer than my 5 year olds for example. But take a 3-4 year old kid with a very low attention span and then the teaching becomes much more difficult,

https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=FTq9n5PRcKY&list=PLthxwAaTJDiK-Ku4I4COULN6f6ENmPXfI&index=1

Sure its hard to teach upcoming stars, but iolder teens can judge for themselves too if the teaching is good for them or not. The little kids are at the mercy of their teacher, they dont know anything better, And also if you crush some little childs confidense they may not overcome it, whereas older kids are not so easily crushed.

January 3, 2019, 4:06 PM · Are we limiting ourselves to those to teach one-on-one to students who become virtuosos? Or can we also count those who have helped large numbers of students - by books or videos as well as in person - whether or not these students become accomplished soloists? If the latter, then Simon Fischer surely deserves a mention.
January 4, 2019, 10:46 AM · Aaron Rosand should be mentioned as well.
January 5, 2019, 1:36 PM · The OP asked for prodigies - I can only think of one teacher, on line, that is a prodigy as an online teacher, and we've seen some of her work on here!
January 5, 2019, 2:11 PM · John who is this teacher?

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