Best rosin with Pirastro Passiones

December 27, 2018, 8:38 AM · Hi! I got Pirastro Passiones for a christmas present. I was wondering that what is the best rosin with them? I have Oliv/Evah rosin now, but I’m not sure is that the best one with those strings. I’ve heard Salchow rosin is great, how about with that string set? Or Evah Pirazzi Gold rosin?

Replies (23)

December 27, 2018, 5:09 PM · I use Leatherwood with mine (supple mixture) and I've been very happy. I did use the Olive/Evah rosin before and prefer Leatherwood.
December 27, 2018, 5:18 PM · Nathan, what type of Leatherwood do you use?
December 27, 2018, 6:33 PM · Oliv Evah is the rosin I 'would' use! Dark rosin for gut strings works very well.
December 27, 2018, 7:19 PM · Samuel, I think Nathan already mentioned he uses the Supple type of Leatherwood

I'm using Andrea Solo, great rosin, help me a lot with playing different dynamic

Edited: December 27, 2018, 8:08 PM · Evah rosin is terrible. Liebenzeller is amazing. Gold I or II for power. Silver I for silky smooth. Meteor-eisen I for in between.
December 27, 2018, 8:37 PM · I have been using Bernardel for all circumstances, but for the Passiones I get better results with Andrea Solo.
December 27, 2018, 9:18 PM · I say to hell with it and use bass rosin.
Works great.
December 27, 2018, 9:33 PM · I use Kaplan and Baker (the lighter colored versions). They both work well.
December 27, 2018, 11:42 PM · Same as Nathan -- I use Leatherwood supple.

If you don't want to drop $70 on a rosin, Vienna's Best or Baker's Original works fine.

Edited: December 28, 2018, 1:02 AM · I'm tempted to agree with Cotton if Samuel is in Finland in the winter time. Otoh maybe he's got his central heating turned up really high.
December 28, 2018, 2:41 AM · Andrea "a piacere" for me, and nothing else. (if I need a lot of bow response, eventually Liebenzeller gold II)
December 28, 2018, 12:35 PM · I've been unloading rosin cakes from my rosin drawers; sent 20 to my out-of-state son and gave 5 to a fellow violinist - still have more than I need.

LEATHERWOOD became my favorite when Tom Baker advertised a half-price special several years ago and I ordered Supple and Crisp cakes for violin, viola and cello. I really like this stuff. Of course it does exactly what I want when I first put it on, but unlike many other "good" rosins I have tried it continues to support my playing in the same way for as long as I need it to. It doesn't get "slippery" and it doesn't get "muddy."

I prefer the crisp variety, which seems to emphasize overtones more) when I am playing in a loud ensemble so I can better hear myself (especially on viola or cello). The supple gives me a smoother tone - but I think both are really great and I am quite certain I will never need to purchase any more rosin cakes (however I probably will, just to see what they are like - old habits are hard to break).

Edited: December 28, 2018, 2:13 PM · Fwiw, I alternate Hidersine 6V and Hidersine 3V.
I've got some Royal Oak and some some Goldflex and some Hill in the drawer. Haven't tried them yet, except for the Goldflex, desultorily. It didn't set my world alight. Trying them with me is probably like giving foie gras to a dog.
December 29, 2018, 7:32 AM · Samuel - as with questions about what the best strings are, questions about which rosin works best on particular strings generally elicit the kinds of posts you see in response to your question: one or two votes for a variety of different rosins. I am not an expert, nor do I use Passiones at this point, but I suspect the answer is more complicated than just which strings you have on your instrument. You will probably need to experiment a bit, or you can ask your luthier for a recommendation. The good news is that experimenting with rosins costs less than experimenting with strings. Also, unless you are a professional, it may not matter the much. Good luck!
Edited: December 29, 2018, 7:42 AM · I've got some fantastic bespoke gluten-free small-batch organic artisan-made rosin that cost me $120 for a tiny cake and it's really great. Just a few swipes and I sound like Heifetz. Forgot what it's called though. They were selling it at a little fruit stand outside the Beef Jerky Outlet Store in West Virginia when we passed through. Oh, now I remember. It's called Mr. Mojo Rosin. (Their slogan is "Keep on Rosin.") Supply is extremely small because it's a sustainable operation sourced in Iceland.
December 29, 2018, 9:30 AM · Thank you for all replies! I ordered Leatherwood Supple yesterday and I hope it eill be good for me :)
December 29, 2018, 9:48 AM · Paul, now I've got the Doors playing on repeat in my head, maybe I'll quote LA Woman the next time I play La Folia.
December 29, 2018, 1:30 PM · Samuel, when I first switched to Passiones I didn't know what rosin would work best either, especially since they are a wound gut. I tried my Salchow medium dark, Andrea Solo and Bernadel first, and while I liked the Salchow best, I read that Pirastro recommended Oliv Evah for the Passiones, so I ordered a cake and have been pleased with it. It seems to work well for me and my set up with a nice draw, overtones I hadn't noticed before, good projection and just the right bite.

The above being said, based on the recommendations for Leatherwood, I think I may give it a try, although my frugal/skeptic side balks at $70 rosin.

December 29, 2018, 1:38 PM · Of the Pirastro rosins, Evah Pirazzi Gold rosin works great with Passione or Passione solo.

Also good: Salchow, Andrea A Piacere, Vienna’s Best.

Edited: December 29, 2018, 6:01 PM · As to the Leatherwood violin rosins and Passione strings, I see there is also a Baroque version for gut strings. Does anyone here using Passiones have any experience with the Baroque rosin? Since Passiones are wound does that negate the attributes of a gut formulated rosin, or is there any real difference?

Thanks in advance for your opinions.

Edited: December 29, 2018, 6:02 PM · JI, I once had the idea to market a brand of rosin called "Mr. Mojo Rosin" and my slogan was going to be "Got to keep-on rosin!" but I was worried about getting sued.

I know $70 seems like a lot for a cake of rosin, but it probably lasts ten years and for most of us, $70 is less than the cost of one lesson.

December 30, 2018, 4:45 AM · Paul, That's catchy even without knowing the reference.

A while back I bought a tin box rosin for 20, maker seems to be P. Guillaume out of France. Works fine with both synthetic and gut strings. Curious about the Leatherwood rosin as I seem to have found the string set I want to use ad infinitum.

January 1, 2019, 5:27 PM · Passiones grip like a synthetic. Leatherwood non-baroque works well with them.


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