E string problem

October 13, 2018, 4:37 AM · I use a Eudoxa E string; it is about 3 months old and well played in. Problem is that no matter how much care I devote to the tuning, I´ve used both acoustic/digital tuning it still sounds `flat´, low, and if I raise it to the pitch I think it should have,hear, it is too `sharp´, high!Does the problem lie in the string, should I just change the string or is it an acoustic Eudoxa phenomenem? Is there anyone else who has experienced this irritating event and can give me some advice?

Replies (5)

October 13, 2018, 5:18 AM · I think you should change your E string. I change mine out once a month because they are not that much money unless you try the platinum models. A new E sounds so good and seems easier to hit the notes right.
October 13, 2018, 7:09 AM · Your string has gine false.
Check the first G on the D with the open string. Then move your hand across to the exact same spot on the A and check it with the open D. Again on rhe E string.
Were all the octaves in tune?
If the violin is tuned and your hand is steady, but the octaves were nonetheless faulty, you need new strings.
October 13, 2018, 8:29 AM · thanks for your replies! I´ll change the string.
October 13, 2018, 11:52 AM · No problem with gut Es. They naturally start to fray after a while and after a couple of months the fraying can enough of a nuisance under the fingers to merit a new string, while the lower gut strings will usually soldier on for the best part of a year at least. Fortunately, a gut E isn't expensive.

The only exception I've had to the "2-month rule" for a gut E was a Chorda E part of a set installed by my luthier consequent on a new bridge installation last November. Surprisingly, as 6 months rapidly approached it was still going strong with hardly any fraying. Then in the middle of a rehearsal of Beethoven 9 it suddenly frayed rapidly along its entire length. Continued playing on it was not a good idea so I left my chair and changed the string. Still can't figure out why that string lasted so long.

Edited: October 13, 2018, 1:44 PM · Yes Trevor, my Chordas last a long time! But the E has to be changed after some months, while the rest live on! On my cheap (but very nice) Gliga violin I run Tonicas, but on my antique violin I run Chordas. BOTH eventually fray (unravel), and the E always fails first, one way or another.

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