Beriot Concerto No. 9 in A minor Question

Edited: January 26, 2018, 7:07 PM · So recently I participated in a Concerto Competition for my Youth Symphony, in which I played Haydn Concerto in G Major, 1st movement + Cadenza.

Aaannndddd I didn't do bad at all whatsoever but I didn't even make it as a honourable mention, but whatever.

So anyways, I'm the associate concertmaster in my Youth Symphony Orchestra and I asked the concert master what she played to win the Concerto competition.

She played the Beriot Concerto No 9. in A minor, 1st mvt. I was wondering how much of a level jump from Haydn G major to Beriot Concerto No 9. in A minor would be.

(Note: My teacher has assigned me to play Bach Concerto No 1 in A minor, and Melodie by Kreisler, just in case you guys need any idea what I'm playing now for reference)


And congrats to whoever just read my silly passage of complaint. Thanks.

Replies (6)

January 26, 2018, 7:09 PM · Well Beriot No. 9 is harder than Haydn G Major, surely. It has lots more "virtuosic" passages, in fact that's pretty much all it is, is a bunch of "virtuosic" technical tricks strung together in a series of vignettes. Not a compositional masterpiece but perfect for a youth competition because of the technical showiness. Haydn was constrained (by himself, surely, but also by the conventional standards of his time) to write an actual Allegro.

Have you done Accolay yet?

January 26, 2018, 7:16 PM · Yes, I played Accolay before Haydn.
January 26, 2018, 7:50 PM · They're pretty close in level. I usually teach Bach a minor and Accolay (order varies depending on the student) and then De Beriot.

January 26, 2018, 8:39 PM · It's not just the difficulty of the work, but how well it's played.
January 27, 2018, 6:13 PM · Lydia I agree but I still think a mediocre Haydn G Major is still easier than a mediocre DeBeriot 9.
January 29, 2018, 9:32 AM · De Beriot might be technically a bit harder (it has those little virtuosic-sounding runs)–but for what it's worth, I'd rather listen to Haydn. Don't get caught up in what other people are playing. Listen to your teacher, work hard, and enjoy Bach!

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