Bow Advice

July 18, 2006 at 04:37 AM · I just wonder that how much is the Sartoy bow usually? If it is about $12,000, is it resonable or too much? They said it is very fine Sartoy, but I don't know anything about it. If the bow is this much expensive, what kind of quality it should have? Well...sounds too broad but is it supposed to have any particular character? Advice please.

Replies (11)

July 18, 2006 at 05:29 AM · That's cheap for Sartory. I think the prices are starting to climb again... 15-16k is pretty standard in the USA.

July 18, 2006 at 07:11 AM · What kind of bow would you want if you shelled out 15k for it? I think I'd want it to play paganini for me, fill out my taxes and make me breakfast! Chances are you'll probably get a good bow for that price ;-) You can get pretty good bows starting at just 6-7k.

July 18, 2006 at 10:48 AM · I wonder what a pinned Sartory bow would cost nowadays?

I saw one in the Kolstein shop that went for $3500 about 7 years ago, and that was one of the best Sartories I've ever played. I got my pin-headed Sartory for exactly $1800 6 years ago, and the owner let me do payments of $100 per month.

July 20, 2006 at 07:07 AM · uh...kevin, where did you acquire this sartory? Because I would love to meet a luthier who would let me pay in $100 increments...wow, you are VERY lucky!!!

July 21, 2006 at 03:39 AM · I AM lucky.

The man who sold the bow to me was NOT a dealer. His beloved wife had died of breast cancer and she was a fine violinist. Hence he was looking to sell her prized bow to a "young violinist with potential" (his words).

In fact, my benefactor was on his way to a WWII veteran's memorial at the adjoining concert hall to the shop I met him at. He had no idea the shop was even there but came in just because he heard the sound of me playing the violin. This man had tried unsuccessfully to sell the bow for years, but nobody would touch a "pinned" bow but me. He arranged for me to sign a contract within about a week of getting the bow and I ended up paying him off early.

Soon, I shall contact him for the first time in years and thank him for selling such a treasured professional tool to me.

July 21, 2006 at 04:46 AM · My Sartory is appraised for insurance for $14k from Ken Warren and this is from several years ago and this is just a normal silver mounted bow and is probably worth more now. $12k is a very good price if it plays well for you and is in good condition. Who is selling the bow and what is the condition? you should make sure all parts of the bow are original. This makes a difference in value. Is this a reputable dealer who will give you papers on it and promise an even trade in value for something in the future? These are all questions you should ask.

July 21, 2006 at 04:39 AM · It sounds like it could be a deal. I have a copy of a Satory that I paid $2,500.00 for and I think it's pretty decent - I could only imagine what the real ones are like!

July 21, 2006 at 04:56 AM · In the NY area you could have the bow checked out by Paul Childs who is a real expert on French bows. He is a very honest person. You can find him on a google search.

July 21, 2006 at 06:24 AM · Paul is in Europe until the fall, Bruce.

As far as what a Sartory is worth, it depends on condition, period, example and weight. $12,000 would be very cheap for a fine silver-mounted one, but could be appropriate for one that isn't so fine.

Jeffrey

July 21, 2006 at 02:29 PM · Thank you so much for all your advices. This bow is coming from my friend's relative. It was bought about 10 years ago in same price what they are offering to me now. So kindly, they don't want to make a profit out of it. Anyway this bow is for my daughter and she said it is pretty light and well balanced. Thank you for helping me to make a decision.

July 24, 2006 at 08:59 PM · I agree with the advice given by Bruce, before you buy, pay for an appraisal by someone whose papers are accepted. Paul Childs is a very good choice for anyone in the US. Some papers are obviously valued more than others, so make sure that this bow does have papers and that they are from a respected (and well known) source.

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