Your favourite STRAD ?

July 6, 2006 at 04:56 AM · What's your favourite STRADIVARIUS ?

I mean, by the sound you hear when they are performed by great violinists ?

Best

AR

Replies (100)

July 6, 2006 at 05:38 AM · I've posted it about 20 times, but my favorite Strad is the 1707 one featured in the Tarisio auction that has a scroll by Omobono.

That Strad had sat in a collection for years and had largely escaped the ravages of time. So when I played it, the varnish was largely intact. That was the best violin I've ever played, by far.

July 6, 2006 at 07:03 AM · I played one that was I think made in 1694 and it was amazing.

July 6, 2006 at 08:40 AM · my favourite strad is the one someone wants to give me to use... (hypothetical situation)

July 6, 2006 at 09:44 AM · most of the best Strads are in the David Fulton collection in Seattle:

Antonio Stradivari, 1715, Baron Knoop

Antonio Stradivari, 1713, Baron d'Assignies

Antonio Stradivari, 1709, La Pucelle

take a look at this site:

http://www.sheilascorner.com/collectordave.shtml

Perlman's "Soil" is deffinitely one of the greats, I also like Josh Bell's 1713 "Gibson" Strad.

I saw the fiddle before restoration and it was in sad shape but still sounded fantastic. It's great to see that a fiddle like that found itself a great home in one of the best pair of hands in the business and is again giving pleasure to so many for so long.

July 6, 2006 at 09:52 AM · Of the ones I have played (around 12) definately the Woolhouse 1721, that used to belong to Felix Galimir. Also the Wilmotte 1734 made a great impression. People tell me that one of the greatest is the Red Diamond 1732 but I have never played it.

July 6, 2006 at 10:56 AM · Mine is the Auer of Vadim Gluzman... I find Gitlis' Strad (do not know which is it) very heavy.

Heard Isabelle Faust with the Sleeping Beauty, which sound I find common.

I heard Repin one with a Strad, one with a Guarneri, and he confessed prefering Brahms on Guarneri.

But the Auer ! I was at 3 meters of Vadim, God ! Never heard such a violin, even with Guarneri, Guadagnini, or what else.

My Storioni seems so "old fashioned" facing this Strad !

Best

AR

July 6, 2006 at 11:47 AM · Shaham's 1699 Countess Polignac is wonderful. My teacher's 1701 Strad is really nice, with a very sweet tone that projects well. I played on an unnamed 1704 that was gorgeous...

Gennady, I agree - I consider Perlman's Soil to be one of the best.

July 6, 2006 at 05:36 PM · I only was at 2 meters of Maurice Hasson Strad, in mid 80`s in Venezuela, sound amazing, but the best is the Perlman`s Soil Strad.

July 6, 2006 at 05:54 PM · I believe Milstein played a Strad which was obviously an instrument whihch spoke very easily with a golden sound.

Oistrakh had 2 Strads the ex-Marsick and the Fontana both of which had a honeyed tome but I think the Fontana was jucier.

July 7, 2006 at 12:01 PM · The Dragonetti strad (used by Campoli and Zimmermann) is great.

The "Soil" 1714 has a lot of character.

MP.

July 7, 2006 at 02:34 PM · What was the Strad featured on Henry Roth's book?

July 7, 2006 at 08:20 PM · For me, definitely the "Hart ex Francescatti" Stradivarius.

Salvatore Accardo owns that violin now. The G-string is just simply AMAZING. I have never heard such deep sound in a violin before.

July 7, 2006 at 11:51 PM · Hi Gen, I have set up the complete works of Henri Vieuxtemps for Naxos...Misha Keylin has been granted the use of the Baron, which happens to be my favorite Strad :-)

July 8, 2006 at 05:37 AM · Jonathan, are you talking about the Baron Knoop? I thought I read an article in Reuning and Son's newsletter that that violin had just been sold to San Francisco's concertmaster...or maybe I'm just going crazy.

By the way, I rehearsed the Allegro de Sonate today. Unfortunately, I won't be performing it on a Strad...

July 8, 2006 at 01:05 PM · Just heard Midori play (2 hrs ago), but not on a Strad (Ex-Hubermann Del Gesu, 1734).

Znaider's Strad is definately worth a mention.

MP.

July 8, 2006 at 02:42 PM · Gennady wrote: "Perlman's "Soil" is deffinitely one of the greats"

Yup. I agree. Great fiddle with a player who knows how to use it. :-) Recent history of ownership (considering who Perlman purchased it from) is pretty convincing too.

July 8, 2006 at 04:59 PM · Michael, how was the Midori concert?

July 8, 2006 at 07:25 PM · Hi Nick, I'll have Misha check this out when he returns from his Asian tour!

The Allegro Sonata is great isn't it? Hard to believe it was composed by a 13 year old Henryk!

July 9, 2006 at 12:56 PM · I heard that Perlman wanted to sell the Soil for USD10 mil. Is that true?

July 9, 2006 at 04:15 PM · Wow, it's a nice instrument...not 10 million USD nice though :-)~

July 9, 2006 at 08:34 PM · If I had to name a glorious violin tone on a Stradivarius, I'd call on Mischa Elman and his "Recamier".

July 9, 2006 at 10:26 PM · I vote for Shaham's Strad. It's warm sweet sound always stood out for me.

July 10, 2006 at 01:17 AM · The Dolphin. Used to be on loan to Midori from the Nippon foundation. Not sure if they are still the owners. Midori used the Dolphin when she recorded Paganini's 24.

July 12, 2006 at 02:05 AM · Andrew S,

Midori was good. She played the Brittin concerto with the Melbourne Symphony (no encore though). Her fingers are very boney.

MP

July 12, 2006 at 04:42 AM · The 'Cathedral' strad as played by nigel kennedy for 4 years. It might have something to do with nige though, strads still sound boring if you dont know how to bring em alive. Not that ive ever played one...

July 12, 2006 at 05:44 AM · I have held one before - it was in Geneva - made in 1725 - looked very much like the Wilhelmj Strad.

July 12, 2006 at 05:45 AM · Also held Repin's 1736 G del Gesu when he came to my country.

July 12, 2006 at 08:16 AM · I think I got high from breathing in the rosin particles off of Perlman's Soil Strad when performed here last January.

July 30, 2006 at 05:50 PM · The "Soil" Strad 1714 is my favorite so far. It has a absolutely gorgeous sound. The first time I hread it was about 16 years ago, and it was amazing back then.

The look of the "Soil" is equally impressive. The beautiful flames of the back is one of the best anywhere.

August 8, 2006 at 02:43 AM · For me, historically, both Milstein and Francescatti made a great and wide sound with their Strads (live recordings usually are guarantee to verify this). E-string sound from Milstein´s was so beautiful and so brilliant, and G-string sound from Francescatti´s , the best I´ve ever heard. About current violins, my favourite is probably Mintz´s (but I think it´s not a Stradivari) and Perlman´s (the 'Soil').

August 8, 2006 at 04:51 AM · Harrumph. Joska Szigeti and I prefer Guarneri del Gesus to Strads anyway. ;)

MG

August 8, 2006 at 07:20 AM · John,

Considering the rapidly escalating retail prices, 10mil might not be too weird given enough time. The Soil is likely to join the ranks of the most mythologized violins, because of the general public's love of Perlman. Probably no violinist in recent history has enjoyed the success he has across various demographics.

August 8, 2006 at 07:14 PM · to look at, the axelrod quartet has my favourite strads. the violins in that quartet 'axelrod' and 'greffhle' are the most amazing looking violins that have ever been built.

my friend's aunt has a strad she got from her juilliard days but i've never heard her play it.

August 8, 2006 at 11:30 PM · Does anyone know which Strad does Kavakos have?My teacher played it a little in a rehersal and told me it was just magic..

August 8, 2006 at 11:34 PM · I LOVE LEONIDAS KAVAKOS!!!!!!!!!!!! Sorry, ignore me, I had to get that out. No idea what fiddle he plays. :)

August 9, 2006 at 12:48 AM · Kavakos own and play Falmouth Strad built in 1692

August 9, 2006 at 01:23 AM · A wonderful Strad of 1692 - the Falmouth - one of the best examples of a pre-1700 Strad that sounds wonderful. Lucky fella - that Kavakos.

August 9, 2006 at 01:35 AM · I think Kavakos kind of made his own luck by playing like a god...

August 9, 2006 at 06:18 PM · when you play like kavakos you need neither luck nor a god. kavakos is beyond amazing.

August 9, 2006 at 07:47 PM · I really like the Taft Strad out of the strads that I've heard live.

August 9, 2006 at 10:03 PM · isn't that what jasper uses from the canadian collection?

August 9, 2006 at 10:31 PM · Hi Pieter,

Your right, that's the Strad that Jasper Wood is currently playing on. It seems to be a good match, I heard him recently and was very impressed. He was also kind enough to show it to me after the concert.

pics here for those interested:

www.canadacouncil.ca/prizes/musical_instrument_bank/

August 9, 2006 at 11:08 PM · Thanks!Kavakos is magic!I will tell you something that will make you as angry as it made me when I heard it and made me think about how mean some people can be.After a consert, I overheard some people (most of them proffesional violinists) talking about someone and they were saying things like"he has no music in him,it makes you wander why people see him like something special",or "he is ok but nothing special" and things like that.when I understood that they were talking about kavakos I got so angry I felt like crying.It was not the first time I heard something bad about Kavakos.It makes me mad!!Is it because they wish they were him?I think that's it,because in my opinion he is the greatest greek violinist!Have you ever heard something really bad for a really good violinist or is it happening only in Greece?

August 10, 2006 at 12:51 AM · Miro, people often just say the usual things they feel others will agree with to win fans for themselves. They likely wouldn't say it about Heifetz, even if they couldn't hear a difference, for example. In my experience, people who don't have classical training in their background or classical aspirations don't do this; usually they just either like or don't like honestly and viscerally. I think it's usually student types too or people at that level of development.

I think it would drive me completely nuts to have to perform for classcial audiences night after night, unless I realized I was just so freakin good nothing mattered. To me, being able to deal with that particular audience is as amazing as the playing itself.

As an antidote, I offer you free movies of wisdom, truth, and love :)

August 10, 2006 at 01:04 AM · Trust me, Miro, Kavakos IS something special. His Sibelius is amazing and it sure shows his musicality! He definitely has something to say. :)

I'm probably going to get to hear him play Bartok 2 with Chicago this year...EEEEEEEK!!!!!! :)

August 10, 2006 at 01:06 AM · Another thing Miro, I've heard people ragging on Vengerov, Szigeti, and even Oistrakh all the time. Some people just need to feel special and pretend like they know everything...it's annoying, but you get used to it. Kavakos is fantastic. :)

MG

August 10, 2006 at 05:17 AM · Kavakos is amazing. His recording of the 24 caprices might be my favorite, though I believe that was done on a Vuillaume. My teacher had the misfortune of showing up at the Sibelius competition the same year as Kavacos and Kaler, who split first prize. My teacher talked to him a bit, and now if I play a caprice kind of boring he actually says,"That might pass an audition, but as Kavakos would say...'it's nothing special'."

I heard Shaham and his strad live the other day and it was great. People say he doesn't have a big sound, but when he really dug in he had as big a sound as anybody else I've heard. He just used a wide range of dynamics.

I also love the Soil strad, but I love Perlman's unique tone on any violin. I am wondering what recordings he has done on that violin, or if Menuhin used it for any of his recordings?

August 10, 2006 at 07:57 AM · I'm with you, Kavakos is one of my most favorite violinists ever!I wish I hear something again bacause this time I will not be socked and I know exacly what I am going to say to them!I'm so happy that people on this site are not negative and they appreciate good things! :)

August 10, 2006 at 02:58 PM · Good to have you around too, Miro! :) We're not perfect though, sometimes even this crowd gets a little snobby...

August 10, 2006 at 04:37 PM · Maura don't get all coy, I can smell the camembert and seared foie gras from here. Don't pretend...

August 10, 2006 at 05:05 PM · Yeah, Jasper plays the Taft strad. He gives it back this coming week though.

August 10, 2006 at 05:18 PM · Pieter,

Whaaat?

MG

August 10, 2006 at 05:58 PM · Viva Foie Gras and... Champagne !

Best

AR

August 10, 2006 at 07:59 PM · what's with everyone putting their initials everywhere all of a sudden...

August 10, 2006 at 08:14 PM · I think Ilya started it. He always signs off "IG".

August 10, 2006 at 08:23 PM · but of course. blame it on the jew.

GI IG

August 10, 2006 at 08:23 PM · Not to worry, IG!! The JEWS are GOD'S CHOSEN, and the APPLE OF HIS EYE!!

JAT TAJ

August 10, 2006 at 09:16 PM · Ilya,

You're Jewish?

MG ;)

August 10, 2006 at 09:44 PM · if he's not i may as well be.

DW

August 11, 2006 at 05:15 AM · EDG

Ha, it feels like carving on an aspen trunk. Not that I would do that.

August 11, 2006 at 12:17 PM · Hey John! when did you get the Taj in your initials?

August 11, 2006 at 05:06 PM · forget that post, I now understand what Ilya is playing on.

August 11, 2006 at 05:13 PM · Hi Anisha!!,

I think it was a typo or a hippo or sum'tin' like that!!

Acutally I am Atanis Markoff,...great Bulgarian Biolinist, come a USA, make a big time Country Music.... in "SMASHABILLY", Tennessee!!

TAJ~JAT

JAT~TAJ

AM~MA

September 25, 2006 at 03:44 AM · The Hart Strad (1727) sounds great in Francescatti's recordings. A number of Strads from the late 1720's have a similar character of tone. I heard a recording by Grumiaux which at first I thought was Francescatti, but it turned out to be a different Strad from around that time. I played a different 1727 Strad a couple of years ago at a dealer in Los Angeles. Wonderful sound, but would crack under pressure.

October 12, 2006 at 03:44 AM ·

October 12, 2006 at 06:26 AM · I think the Soil sounds a lot like a very good Strad. It's not as if the standard to meet is Del Gesu (alone)...

I had the priviledge to see Ms. Chang's Del Gesu at a concert last year, it's a beautiful looking instrument and the sound is fantastic. One of my favourite violins is actually a Gofriller and a Bergonzi.

October 12, 2006 at 02:05 PM · I have some wonderful associations in my musical memory of Perlman/Soil, Francescatti/Hart, and Grumiaux/Dupont.

The Hills, in their book on Stradivari, cite the Alard as one of the best of the best. I believe that Staryk said the same of his Barrere (sp?). Is anyone familiar with these?

October 13, 2006 at 01:48 AM ·

October 13, 2006 at 04:25 AM · Mike, I feel that the Soil is definitely in the Strad range of sound. It is more brilliant and gutsy than some. But its lusterous, bright soprano voicing, and its transparency along with what Perlman might call "jhit" (cf "The Art of Violin") are different from many del Gesus, which tend to be darker, more translucent, and with more of a mezzo voicing. On the other hand, the very cutting Kreisler del Gesu, which I tried some years ago is a bit akin to the soil - yet different. They're all individual instruments, belonging to respective 'families'. Some bear a closer resemblance to one another than others. We can't completely separate the player from the instrument. The instrument - and bow - definitely makes a difference, but the player is more important. Hilary Hahn sounds beautiful on her Vuillaume.

I'm with you on the moderns. I'm fortunate to own a first class replica of the Hellier, made in China several years ago. I like it better than three not great authentic Srads that I've tried! I've got a great modern American bow by Halsey that matches it beautifully. You never know.

October 13, 2006 at 01:44 PM ·

October 13, 2006 at 06:30 PM · Personally I haven't played enough Strads and Del Gesus to form an opinion, but if I ever get to touch the Soil I'll be more clear on the issue.

October 14, 2006 at 07:37 PM · Jamie Laredo's strad doesn't sound too bad during lessons ;) The only Strad I get to hear on a regular basis, but it's definitely a good one; 1717 Gariel Strad.

October 14, 2006 at 08:46 PM · Hi,

Mike, Mr. Repin plays on a Del Gésu actually. Just thought I should point that out. He has a Strad on loan, but does not use it for most concerts.

Cheers!

October 15, 2006 at 02:18 AM · I love the sound of Efrem Zimbalist's 1735 Strad. It's ultra pure, soprano, smooth, and clean.

Jan Kubelik's 1715 "Emperor" also caught my attention. That's a dark booming violin as is common with many of the "Golden Period" Strads.

October 15, 2006 at 03:15 PM ·

October 15, 2006 at 05:10 PM · I forgot about Franz von Vecsey's Stradivarius and Vasa Prihoda's "Camposelice" Strad. The old Doring book that lists all the known Stradivari violins of the day talks about these two instruments, as well as many others.

Of course, great tone from Strads is also largely due to great tone from the bows used to play on them.

October 15, 2006 at 05:21 PM · And the great players who play on those great instruments and bows. :)

October 15, 2006 at 05:22 PM · Hi,

Mike, your opinions make sense. Part of it has to do also with the patterns, and the way the instruments need to be played. In general, Strads require a more delicate touch, while with Del Gésu they can withstand and even demand a more energetic bow stroke and often a slower bow speed, which in turn participates also in a darker sound.

Cheers!

October 15, 2006 at 05:39 PM · speaking of bows...

October 16, 2006 at 12:47 AM · Pieter, what about bows...

October 16, 2006 at 12:52 AM · yes what about bows?

October 16, 2006 at 01:17 AM · Maura knows.

Edit: I want to bring up an interesting point that Michael Darnton brings up on his website;

He says that a lot of people think they're Del Gesu players, but he's found in his own experience that most people can't play a true Guarneri style properly because of the force needed. That's an interesting point to reflect on.

October 16, 2006 at 01:20 AM · Greetings,

that`s interesting but I am not 100% convinced by it. Yes there are player sin the Guarneri camps as oppsoed to Strad, but did Heifetz (for example)really play with force? For me he was about relxation and speed., not pressure. He once said `the more you press the less comes out.` Not suggestoing you are equating pressing with force though.

Maybe it has soemthing to do with today`s set up and strings as well?

Cheers,

buri

October 16, 2006 at 03:03 AM · Stephen,

You can generate a lot of power with bow speed, it's a different way to make a big sound.

October 16, 2006 at 03:36 AM · I just repeated a very interesting listening experience. Does anyone know the book, "The Miracle Makers"? It's put out by Bein&Fushi. It contains beautiful photographs and other info. on 15 Strads and 15 del Gesus. It also includes CD's with Elmar Oliveira playing different selections on each violin. At the end, oliveira plays the same selsection on each one - the opening of the Sibelius, without accompaniment.

Listening over and over, back and forth, I certainly heard differences - sometimes major differences, and sometimes very subtle ones. I couldn't say that an auditory red flag would wave to me announcing a del Gesu vs. a Strad. Each instrument had something of its own to offer. It was oliveira who dominated my ears -as well he should have. Even he was not perfect under these circumstances, often not holding tied notes for their full value. Nonetheless, the entire recording was a most impressive feat. I came away with a few consistant favorites. The Ysaye-Stern del Gesu was open and juicy (- and not surprisingly, Oliveira didn't sound anything like Stern). The Kemp del Gesu was strong with good presence and richness. By comparison to these and others, I rather didn't care for his own Stretton too much. And I loved the Wilmotte Strad, which was silkier, open, semi-bright, chewy and complex.

I would love it if some great players could, for the purposes of experiment, agree to record a few excerpts on the same violin, bow, strings, etc., to eliminate those variables and get at the essence of their indidvidual sounds in a different way. i think it would be very interesting.

October 16, 2006 at 03:36 AM · I just repeated a very interesting listening experience. Does anyone know the book, "The Miracle Makers"? It's put out by Bein&Fushi. It contains beautiful photographs and other info. on 15 Strads and 15 del Gesus. It also includes CD's with Elmar Oliveira playing different selections on each violin. At the end, oliveira plays the same selsection on each one - the opening of the Sibelius, without accompaniment.

Listening over and over, back and forth, I certainly heard differences - sometimes major differences, and sometimes very subtle ones. I couldn't say that an auditory red flag would wave to me announcing a del Gesu vs. a Strad. Each instrument had something of its own to offer. It was oliveira who dominated my ears -as well he should have. Even he was not perfect under these circumstances, often not holding tied notes for their full value. Nonetheless, the entire recording was a most impressive feat. I came away with a few consistant favorites. The Ysaye-Stern del Gesu was open and juicy (- and not surprisingly, Oliveira didn't sound anything like Stern). The Kemp del Gesu was strong with good presence and richness. By comparison to these and others, I rather didn't care for his own Stretton too much. And I loved the Wilmotte Strad, which was silkier, open, semi-bright, chewy and complex.

I would love it if some great players could, for the purposes of experiment, agree to record a few excerpts on the same violin, bow, strings, etc., to eliminate those variables and get at the essence of their indidvidual sounds in a different way. I think it would be very interesting.

October 16, 2006 at 04:02 AM · Sorry for the repeat!

October 16, 2006 at 05:05 AM · I was fortunate enough to hear Il Cremonese at the Stradivari museum being played and it was magnificent.

The Soil is superb of course, too. I also like the 1730 that Meyers plays (see http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pTLdyAVUWps ).

October 16, 2006 at 02:48 PM · Mr. Townsend, I sent you an e-mail, did you get it? It didn't seem to be working properly because it was comming back to me.

Raphael,

It also depends who is playing. Some very good violinists have fairly neutral sounds, whereas some soloists are fairly distinctive. For me it's like someone with a great voice, like Orson Wells speaking through a great mic then a terrible one... it will sound the same, one will just represent the quality of his voice better.

October 16, 2006 at 03:57 PM · I have an LP of Milstein playing his Stradivarius on Dvorak and Glazunov.

The same performance sounds totally different on the "Art of Nathan Milstein" digitally remastered box set. To my ears, the tone on the CD sounds NOTHING like a real violin. The LP sounded a lot warmer and less tinny, though Milstein still is overmiked in relation to the rest of the orchestra (ALL studio recordings are that way). Such is the nature of digital processing vs. analog sound.

In the same sense, different halls change the sound of the violin. As far as I'm concerned, the concert hall is an amplifier in itself. Certain violins sound great in halls and certain ones do not, and that doesn't necessarily correlate with price or pedigree of the instrument or hall.

To me, there's no way to capture in recording the true sound of a violin. Whether it's DAT, tape, LP, 8-track, DVD, or CD, it all sounds like an utter distortion to me.

October 16, 2006 at 05:04 PM · Hi,

Kevin, I also tend to prefer sound in LP's too. One major difference. LP's have a continuous sound, where as CD's do not - it's pixeling. In spite of what engineers tell me, it doesn't sound the same. Another good example is the remaster of the Brahms Double with Oistrakh, Rostropovich and Cleveland/Szell. The CD doesn't caputre the intensity of the original LP.

Great instruments possess one quality in common: Resonance.

Cheers!

October 16, 2006 at 05:04 PM · From: Skowronski: Classical Recordings

Dear Mr. Huang:

Your comments are well noted and appreciated. But, since day one of Mr. Skowronski's recording career, he has always insisted on "taping" in a LIVE HALL situation. Even his many recital performances from WFMT-FM radio in Chicago were broadcast employing the station's LIVE IN CONCERT format. When the 'red light' went on in the studio, that was it! And every performance, everywhere, every time, featured the artist's fantastic Guarneri filius Andrea. So, yes,......there is quite a vast and intended spectrum of "the Skowronski Sound" that can be experienced on any Skowronski recording.

And we thank you for mentioning this performance phenomenon again, Mr. Huang. LIVE performance and LIVE recording are truly indigenous and almost crucial to the real and true "Art of Violin Playing," especially today, -------indeed, for better or for worse!

Best regards,

Skowronski: Classical Recordings

http://www.skowronskiplays.com

October 16, 2006 at 06:13 PM · Christian, it doesn't sound the same, but it's a common misunderstanding that it isn't "continuous." True it's stored as discrete samples; taken following certain rules. But in playback a filter is applied which literally restores the content that was "in between" those samples. Possible only because the original sound and the filter behavior are the result of the same laws of nature. It's fascinating and a great intro to signal processing.

The violins that require more force; I've noticed some of them really resist the bow, sort of like slogging through mud. Is that what's being talked about here?

October 16, 2006 at 06:33 PM · Ms. Gerety politely inquires why Mr. Skowronski always refers to himself in the third person? :)

October 16, 2006 at 06:58 PM · sunset boulevard.....

October 16, 2006 at 07:12 PM · Ehnes Marsick Strad of 1715 is simply the best sounding Stradivarius I heard...In the same concert hall, Milstein, Perlman and Menuhin ( both played the "Soil") and Francescatti were marvellous ,but the sound of the Marsick is a kind of combination of both qualities you have in a Strad and a del Gesù...the most powerful instruments I heard in the same hall were the Leduc del Gesu and the Ysaie del Gesu played by Szeryng and Stern...

Marc

October 16, 2006 at 07:30 PM · Hi,

Jim, thanks for that. Very interesting. I didn't know that.

Cheers!

October 16, 2006 at 08:14 PM · Marc,

You might also think that because Ehnes is one of the most impossibly gifted musicians of our time... I'm pretty sure anything would sound the best in his hands.

October 17, 2006 at 02:25 AM · I have a simple question about one of our more popular choices: how, approximately, is "Soil" pronounced? I know that being French, it's not the same as say, potting soil for plants. I've heard everything from "soy -el" (with the accent on the 2nd syllable) to "shwa"??

Also, the great old time connoisseur, Count Cozio de Salabue - how is his last name pronounced? I've heard something like "salabu-ay"??

October 16, 2006 at 10:43 PM · Somebody call up the operator in France and get her to say it, then start a thread and tell us what it was.

This discussion has been archived and is no longer accepting responses.

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