Great Classical Sonata for Violin and Piano?

May 11, 2006 at 05:31 AM · I am trying to decide on a classical violin sonata to prepare for a sonata course focusing on classical composers. I have played the early Beethoven Op. 12's and also the Mozart Sonata in B-flat (the later one that begins with the short Adagio before the 1st mvt. Allegro...can't remember the K#). What are some other great classical violin/piano sonatas out there?

Replies (16)

May 11, 2006 at 10:14 AM · Greetings,

do you mean `classical` in the specifc or layman sense?

Some of the most beautiful stuff around can be found in the Schubert Sonatinas. These are sonatas but the publsiher was afraid of not being able to penetrate the `amateur` market so they were christened sonatinas to suggets they might be somewhat easier than they really are. Just gorgeous.

There is a book that explores the violin/keyboard sonata genre in immense depth by Abram Loft (?) he was the violia/violin(?) in the Fine Arts Quartet I think. (Violin and Keyboard- The duo Repertoire. )The first book in the series ends on Mozart so there are many contemporary sonata described with many practicla hints and useful bits of commentary. The second begins with Beethovem and heads to the present day. I havenever seen the second

Cheers,

Buri

May 11, 2006 at 12:52 PM · Schubert wrote wonderful sonatas I like the Rondeau brilliant best of all, the Grand Duo Sonata was once played by rachmaninoff and kreisler and is another irresistable choice because it is so melodic

May 11, 2006 at 02:04 PM · Yes, Buri, I mean 'classical' in terms of that period in music history. Sorry for the confusion. I had forgotten about the Schuberts! Those are nice for sure. I am going against my own word at this point, too, and am starting to lean towards later Beethoven, like maybe his 7th in c minor. I guess I'd like to branch out more, but you can never go wrong with Beethoven, either! There's just too much out there to play... :)

May 11, 2006 at 02:10 PM · Have you looked into the Haydn sonatas?

May 11, 2006 at 05:23 PM · I have seen a recording of Clementi sonatas but I cannot locate sheet music--what's up with that?

May 11, 2006 at 05:47 PM · Bach wrote wonderful sonatas for violin and keyboard. Can you do Baroque, or are you limited to High Classical?

May 11, 2006 at 09:17 PM · Have any of the Rossini string sonata's been transcribed for violin and piano, and/or violin and guitar?

Those are pretty great, imo.

May 11, 2006 at 10:20 PM · We are working on it now, and it's very difficult, but it's my current #1: The Cesar Franck A Major

though I guess it's more of the "Romantic" time period.

May 11, 2006 at 10:10 PM · "Yes, Buri, I mean 'classical' in terms of that period in music history. Sorry for the confusion. I had forgotten about the Schuberts! Those are nice for sure. I am going against my own word at this point, too, and am starting to lean towards later Beethoven, like maybe his 7th in c minor. I guess I'd like to branch out more, but you can never go wrong with Beethoven, either! There's just too much out there to play... :) "

May 11, 2006 at 10:32 PM · Franck?? That's pretty much as romantic as you can get.

May 12, 2006 at 12:34 AM · Greetings,

no, I am as romantic as you can get.

Frank pales by comparison.

Cheers and flowers,

Buri

May 12, 2006 at 01:38 AM · carl phillip emmanuel bach wrote 33 sonatas. johann christian wrote 6 sonatas for violin or flute. viotti wrote 18 sonatas. haydn wrote 10. von dittersdorf wrote 3. gluck wrote 6 sonatas for two violins if you'd care to go that route. if not there's always the melodie arranged by kreisler.

none of these pieces are on the same musical level as mozart or beethoven's works but it was a transitional period for chamber music and it would be a mistake to overlook some of these composers (namely cpe bach and viotti) who were as revolutionary for their time as beethoven was for his.

May 12, 2006 at 02:21 AM · There's a rather good Classical-period sonata by Czech composer Jan Vaclav Vorisek (1791-1825), kind of showy in places. It is in G Major (the final movement is in G Minor), Op. 5. Not as inspired as Beethoven or Mozart, but still worth looking at. Schubert's influence can be heard. It has a difficult piano part. I can't recall where I got the music many years ago, but it is imported. I have an old Supraphon recording issued in the US on the old Epic Crossroads label, which you might turn up someplace. The performance time is about 27 minutes.

May 12, 2006 at 11:51 AM · Hi,

Jennifer, you may want to take a look at the Mozart A Major Sonata K.526. Very different in spirit than the K.454 that you played, but just as good.

The strangest sonatas from the classical period that I have played were the Pinto sonatas (there are 3). Was part of a project, but wouldn't recommend them.

Cheers!

May 12, 2006 at 01:30 PM · Hey, buri, thanks for the candlelight dinner, the champagne was divine...

May 12, 2006 at 09:04 PM · K526 is a monster. It just might be the wildest classical sonata ever. For more modest stuff, try Weber or CPE.

IG

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