Tadioli violins

May 17, 2005 at 08:19 PM · One of my students is looking at a Tadioli violin. I have not seen it yet (I'll see it later today). Anyway, I was wondering if anyone knows how much Tadioli's fiddles cost, if anyone own's them, or if anyone has played one, what you think, etc. Thanks in advance.

Replies (4)

May 18, 2005 at 04:30 AM · I played on a Tadioli violin for a number of years, until I finally moved on to an older fiddle. My particular violin took a bronze medal in some building competition that Tadioli had entered... it had a very nice sound and was easy to play, but my one complaint was that it was in general too muffled of a sound. I believe the cost was something like $8500, but I could be wrong on that, and it might be worth more today as well. My brother still plays on his Tadioli viola, which took the silver medal in the same competition, and it's an amazing instrument: beautiful sound, and almost effortless to play compared to any other viola I've tried. All in all, I think as a maker Tadioli is steady gaining prestige, and if the violin your student is trying is as good as the one I used, it should be a good option to consider.

May 21, 2005 at 03:16 PM · Tom, I'm curious...how did the Tadioli sound at a distance? It may have had that peculiar muffled fuzziness under the ear, yet focused clarity even at twenty feet.

Michael Darnton recently mentioned a Stradivari violoncello with this type of sound production. They are, indeed, difficult to judge. When coming across such instruments, I'm always struck by how liquid and crisp they sound from a distance, even having a wholeness and core to their tone over that of many others.

Tadioli is producing some beautiful instruments. They are being sold for $9000-$10,000US.

Another Italian maker that is producing unbelievably good-sounding instruments is Roberto Collini--and I've come across them for just under the $10K mark.

Eric

May 24, 2005 at 01:57 PM · William, What were your thoughts on the instrument after having the opportunity to hear your student play?

May 24, 2005 at 09:21 PM · The violin was decent, but a little muffled. Actually, I wasn't too impressed. Anton Krutz of KC strings sells his violins for 10K and I think the Krutz is a much better instrument.

Anyway, my student wanted the best I could find, so I called Valery Kagansky, a maker in Brooklyn. The Kagansky blew it away. Now there is a modern maker. Of course, his fiddles sell for 17 grand. But really, that's a bargain for this quality of fiddle. If you have the means, I highly recommend one. I play a Tripodi (also NY), but I don't think he's currently making. Anyway, his fiddles go for 25K, but it's the best modern fiddle I've ever tried, bar none. The Kagansky was close, however.

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