practicing when sick

December 27, 2004 at 02:16 AM · How much do you practice when you are sick? Or do you practice at all when you are sick? And HOW do you practice when you are sick? Any comments? suggestions? experiences?

Replies (9)

December 27, 2004 at 02:36 AM · Greetings,

Don't practice - for practice requires the utmost attention and concentration on what you are doing (worthwhile productive practice that is) - and when your sick you might want to do that - but the problem is your body doesn't. I would rest of for the period - your body and hands will understand your situation :)

Cheers,

Adam

December 27, 2004 at 03:19 AM · if you just have the flu or something, put on some beethoven and go to bed.

December 27, 2004 at 03:50 AM · Buy a packet of prunes and go to bed more like it haha

December 27, 2004 at 04:52 AM · Greetings,

Adam's advice is excellent but it's best to set up a bed near the toilet.

Being sick is a wonderful time to -rethink- what playing the violin is about in the end. As someone once said 'if you are violinist who is not a musician then you are not a violinsts.'

Pretty bloody silly comment if you ask me, but part of studying the violin is relentless listenign to music and studying scores.

Cheers,

Buri

December 27, 2004 at 11:21 PM · Wheeeee!

This is great!

I have ten times the energy by the end of the day.

For Christmas I got LOTS of dvds of various great violinists, I think so anyway: Oistrakh, Milstein, Menuhin, Szeryng, Perlman, etc. etc. So I am just vegging and watching. Plus I also got Beethoven string quartets (complete score and cd). I am studying them one at a time.

I'm also reading my musician joke book.

"Maybe it's *because* Nero played the fiddle that they burned Rome."

Happy Holidays!

(p.s. send prunes! prunes would be much appreciated)

December 28, 2004 at 01:04 AM · Glad you are feeling better, Nick!

December 28, 2004 at 06:12 AM · you weren't sick, you just wanted our sympathy huh? i have an ear problem right now, my sinus infection is making me hear loud ringing. IM GOING INSANE!

December 28, 2004 at 08:11 AM · I actually disagree. I know someone who learned literally 3 cello concertos in bed while she had a broken leg. After she had it all down, when she was ready to play again, she just had to get used to the cello and the concertos just came out. Isn't that amazing?And it's all do-able. In fact, there are a lot of people who advocate practicing the violin AWAY from the violin anyways. Here's how. Basically, before you go into a piece, you should know the piece pretty well. Have a few recordings. Study the orchestra part/piano part/bass line/whatever. When you look at the music, there will be funky stuff that because you KNOW how to play, you'll know how to practice. Don't believe me? I can't say how many times I'm like 6 months into a piece and I don't even know the intervals between some of the notes I'm playing, and personally, I think for intonation that is one of the most crucial things you need to know. So... figure out what is hard and figure out all the little details between the notes... you know... positions... intervals between the notes, how you want to finger those notes... etc etc. Then just... I don't know... study it. Know it backwards and forth. Read it along through recordings. Get to be a master of whatever you're playing. If you're playing chamber music, it's really crucial to know who's doing what and when so you can give cues, or know who you're playing with, or other important things like that that you could do by yourself instead of spending group time. Now... I don't know how sick you are or what kind of sick, but what I'm saying a perfectly healthy person could and probably should do as well. If you're working on Bach... being sick must be really nice because you can really shape it and go in depth what it should sound like as well as going into what YOU want. Figuring out the analytical part of the music will also really help in memorizing, and when you get back on the violin, you know exactly what you should be doing! Just fix some technical things, and then you're into the more fun emotional building part :-P. Oh well... I hope you get better! Enjoy!

- Wenhao Sun

December 29, 2004 at 05:55 PM · ooooooh grrrroan

Thanks for the great advice! I'll do that!

I've been listening to lots of music and decided to reorganize all the tapes and cds and put them into alphabetical order. I discovered lots of music I didn't even know I had on cd and about 50 tapes that had been obscured in the back of the cabinet (thanks, mom!)

Right now I'm listening to a concerto for viola d'amore and lute by Vivaldi.

Everyone stay health cough cough hack hack

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