Vadim Repin

November 21, 2004 at 12:54 AM · I just came back from watching Vadim Repin perform the Prokofiev violin concerto #1. It was simply amazing, flawless, beautiful. His vibrato in the third movement was to diiieee for!!!

I went back stage, and I got his autograph, and I saw his Stradivarius, and I HUGGED HIM! I HUGGED VADIM REPIN

OMG I AM IN LIKE A SHOCK. ahhhhhhhhh!!

Replies (13)

November 21, 2004 at 02:29 AM · I heard it was a good concert.

November 21, 2004 at 07:13 AM · Yes, it was very gooooood.

November 21, 2004 at 05:18 PM · That's interesting cause I just saw him play Dvorak concerto pretty terribly last week. It was very out of tune and his vibrato was ultra-fast and nervous sounding. He also had numerous memory slips and not so minor ones either.

November 21, 2004 at 09:44 PM · Amy, I can't believe... I know him (not personally) since he was 8, when he already successfully performed... Recently, I attended his performance where he played Tchaik. He sounded great with perfect intonation and brilliant technique. Can say that he a little 'overplayed' with timbres... I already wrote about it on this board a month ago. Probably, you, unfortunately, visited his most unhappy performance (we are all humans, and it might happen...)He is said not to have been of good personality but it doesn't affect his playing ability.

November 21, 2004 at 11:40 PM · Greetings,

Rita, if he has some personality problems then I think this hugging thing is probably good. It would make a great v.commie social project. Everybody who eveyr meets Repin gives him a hug.

If you need to practice then you can use me of course,

Cheers,

Buri

November 22, 2004 at 12:35 AM · Rita,

Actually I went to 3 Repin concerts in the past week. Two of them were performances of Dvorak, and both performances were exactly as I described, really not very good.

The other performance was a recital in which he played Ysaye Ballade, Strauss Sonata, Prokofiev 2nd sonata, and Mozart e minor sonata. The Mozart, I have to say, was absolutely terrible. The people I went with agreed that the Mozart was very bad. The Ysaye was about 3x too fast, and he definitely did not play all the correct notes, or even close to it. But the Strauss and the Prokofiev were fantastic.

Perhaps he is just inconsistent, because sometimes he sounded amazing.

November 22, 2004 at 12:42 AM · Buri, I'd be very happy to practice on you but I really need to enlarge my arms at least 3 times, isn't it?

You gave a good idea to hug Repin. Let's kiss him too. XO

November 22, 2004 at 01:58 AM ·

November 22, 2004 at 02:16 AM · 4 memory slips ain't too good.

November 22, 2004 at 02:41 AM · D. Kurganov, I'm just boiling... But I'm glad you like Repin too. His sound is unique and his experiments with violin's timbres and colors are interesting (though sometimes, because of these experiments, he is quite out of composer's style. It's only my opinion.)

November 22, 2004 at 08:23 AM · It is my personal opinion that if one is playing with the Cleveland Orchestra, one should NOT have any memory slips, let alone 4. Not to mention, his intonation was extremely off at times.

November 22, 2004 at 06:50 PM · Actually, his performance with Cleveland wasn't very redeemable at all...I must agree with Amy. Out of tune, scratchy, not lyrical in the least, memory slips...at least Thomas Zehetmair's mediocre Stravinsky concerto a month ago was somewhat compelling...

November 22, 2004 at 06:42 PM · I would have to agree with that Amy. Some of these players giving 200+ concerts a year can get pretty sloppy.

For these 200+ concert a year artists their practice is usually on the stage. When Mr. Heifetz was interviewed in Time Magazine back in the 60's he talked about how the field had changed. He along with the bigger musicians of his day like Horowitz, Rubenstein, Piatigorsky, etc., were accustomed to giving maybe 50 or 60 concerts at most a season and have the summers off. Heifetz found that the level of performance had been diminished since the up rise of demands from management for more performances from their artists.

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