Music scene in other countries

November 4, 2004 at 10:10 PM · In all seriousness, I really would like some advice about the music/Suzuki teaching scene elsewhere in the world (English speaking). How is it in Canada? Austrailia? Bermuda? (Now that would be nice!)

Replies (2)

November 5, 2004 at 12:07 AM · I'm over in Perth, in Australia. Now Perth is not really connected very well with the rest of Australia (We are the most remote city in the world). Perthites tend to do what we want, and every now and then turn part of our attention to the Eastern States (Boxing Day test match, Melbourne Cup, AFL Grand Final etc).

This provides a great scene for music as we aren't really influenced by many other people - we make our own tune, we beat our own drum.

(now comes the Tourist ad spiel).

Perth is a wonderful city with a great standard of living. Perth is a city of about 1.2 million people. It stretches from Mindarie in the north down to Mandurah in the South. Our climate is excellent, with probably the bluest skies you will see anywhere in the world. In winter, our max temperatures are in the low twenties. in summer they are high 30's, with only a couple of days in the 40's (that's when you head over to our pristine beaches, Scarborough, Cottesloe, Trigg). Humidity is fairly stable, and the rain is enough to keep our gardens happy.

WA has a wide and varied musical background. IN the popular music center, we have produced a number of great bands, including the John Butler Trio, Eskimo Joe, and a number of other artists who have made it on the national scene due to their own unique sounds.

In the classical music world, there are two training institutions, the School of Music located at the University of Western Australia, Nedlands (on the forshore of the Swan River) and the Western Australian Acadamy of Performing Arts (Formerly known as the Conservatorium), which is located on the Mount Lawley campus of Edith Cowan University. Both of these institutions work together and put on concerts of the highest class.

If your child is learning music in WA, they have the opportunity to join WAYMA, the Western Australian Youth Music Association. This association consists of a number of Ensembles. THere are two string ensembles (Sinfonietta and COllegium), two Choirs (Perth Childrens Choir and the Western Australian Youth Chorale), a Symphonic Band (WAYMA Symphonic Band) and two Orchestras (Philharmonic and the Western Australian Youth Orchestra, WAYO). These ensembles provide excellent training and playing experiences, and challenge the students. One former WAYO member commented that he thought he wouldn't be ready for Juilliard, but thanks the the level of auditions that WAYO required, he found the audition to Juilliard a breeze.

If you're a bit older, there's the Metropolitan Symphony Orchestra, an amature orchestra that puts on about 4 concerts a year, there's the Fremantle Symphony Orchestra (pretty sure they're amature), and the WEstern Australian Symphony Orchestra (Professional, put on about 70 concerts a year).

In terms of concert series, WASO is the one putting on the most number of concerts, but we also have the UWA Music series which presents a number of world class concerts, Musica Viva is in full swing, and the Australian Chamber Orchestra and Australian String Quartet make plenty of appearences as well.

Almost every private school (Anglican, Catholic, Uniting, Baptist, you name it, there's a school) in western Australia provides music tuition, and the two best public schools for music tuition would be PErth Modern and Churchlands Senior High School. Other public schools have music programs, but it's the state with all music around australia - 93% of Private schools have some music tuition, where as only 23% of Public schools have music tuition.

Umm, i don't think i've missed anything...

November 5, 2004 at 12:42 AM · I'm not sure you'll easily find anything quite so structured as you have experienced/learned from Ronda. Ronda has an incredible thing going with her young Suzuki studio. She actually teaches the Suzuki method the way it's supposed to be tought.

I think just about anywhere you go will benefit from a program like hers.

Preston

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