Mozart Violin Concerto No. 5. student request for information on it.

February 29, 2004 at 10:23 PM · Hello everyone, I am having trouble finding technical analysis for the Mozart Concerto No. 5 for violin on the net. Is there a book with the concerto in great detail, of form, style, keys and all analysis, description of the period, and how to present it for a recital. I am wanting to know everything possible about it, including how to do the trills correctly technically and where to accent notes and how to play the notes correctly. I have the edition by Ivan Galamian and a CD acc. from Peters in London which is a little fast yet for me in the first movement. I can't find a CD that is a little slower, just for practise purposes to learn the acc. before I go to an accompanist with it. I would like to know everything on how to technically perform it and how to interpret it in great depth. Thankyou very much. Jenny.

Replies (7)

March 1, 2004 at 03:06 AM · Greetings,

don`t forget you have to learn the notes...;)

In general, trills for

The advice Galamian often gave his studnets was to -not- listen to a recording of the work you are studying but othe rworks by the same composer so that you can get a sense of the style without corrupting your own ideas.

Szigeti advised that te bets way to get into this cocnerto was to study the string quartets and there is no reason not to follow that.

Your basic job of interpretation is to play what is written on the page with precision. The phrasing will come from the way you sing, noy imitating a CD,

Bets of luck,

Buri

March 1, 2004 at 03:34 AM · Sorry,

something didn`t come through here.

About the most hsitorical work you need to begin with is the book by Leopold Mozart.

Cheers,

Buri

March 1, 2004 at 07:41 AM · Thankyou for your answers everybody. I really appreciate it. Jenny.

March 2, 2004 at 01:22 AM · Hi Jenny,

I understand from your post that you're listening to an accompaniment CD rather than a recording of the concerto being performed? Where does one find these CDs? About the tempo problem, I understand that there is a computer programme available that can alter the tempo of a downloaded recording without altering the pitch...

March 2, 2004 at 10:58 PM · Thankyou very much Stephen and Sue. Yes Sue, the CD I am listening to is just the accompaniment. Even though I find it hard to play TO a CD rather than live interaction with an accompanist playing WITH, the CDs are not too bad! You can purchase them at Peters.Edition@boosey.com in England and ask for Mr. Stuart Cooper. They will send you out a catalogue if you want one. There are lots of other CDs in the catalogue, for violin acc. as well.....Franck Sonata in A, Mendelssohn concerto in Eminor, Bach concerto no 1 in A minor, Beethoven Romances in G an F etc. You can ring them up at the Boosey and Hawkes Music Shop at 295 Regent Street London WIB 2JH on phone (your country code first...) 44-2072917244 or fax them on 44-2072917249. They will accept credit card on the phone and you can write e-mails to Stuart if you want anything. They are very reliable. Hope this helped. Jenny. P.S. Does anyone know where I can buy editions edited by Isaac Stern?

March 4, 2004 at 11:11 AM · Hi Jenny

I think with Mozart an important aspect is the style which is often most difficult to interpret...the fact that every note is important and the precision of playing required-- it is every different say from romantic concertos where you can use slides and rubato on the violin to assist you... Listen to recordings like Anne Sophie Mutter (there is a really good early recording) - I found that really helped more than reading about it... Also even some excerpts from Mozart's operas.. He was a really "operatic" composer in terms of all his music in a way- so that might help with the style and the sound you are looking for too.

Good luck! Michelle

March 5, 2004 at 12:22 AM · Thanks for the good luck wish Michelle, and the helpful advice. I will get the recording as I think it will help me. I have a recording of Menuhin playing it and I nearly gave up the violin when I heard it as I thought I would never be able to sound anywhere that good! He sounds very soft and gentle in some ways in the recording.

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