how to stay motivated when depressed

February 11, 2012 at 11:14 PM · i cant focus on music that good. ive had to avoid my instrument and cut lessons almost 2hrs short. i get disgusted when i play nd disgusted when i dont play. i feel like im f***** losing it and i just dont know what to do anymore. music was like my last sanctuary and i think im losing int and im scared to lose it and im scared of myslef. if you have any tips on how to stay motivated, please help me out and tell me.

Replies (37)

February 11, 2012 at 11:35 PM · Hunter, if there's anyone you trust that you can talk to, I'd suggest that first...sounds like you are stuck somewhere that you might need some extra help being pulled out of. Please take care of that part of yourself first.

as far as playing...try to put aside your expectations for a little bit, and see if you can find a place where you can just play. put away the sheet music, put on a recording that fits your mood, take out your instrument, and play along. Or, pick a key (A minor was very satisfying when I was a teenager) and play the most emotionally expressive thing you can. If you haven't improvised before take a theme from a piece you know well, play it from memory, and play it over and over until you have begun to change it and make it yours.

Play "ugly" things on your instrument, play one note and make it express as much as you can. Sing and scream. It sounds like you need to let some things out. The way I returned myself to music when we "got in a fight" was by removing the trappings - the chains - the page, the expectations, someone else's compositions, and just playing. I hope that you find your way back - I have seen your posts here a lot and you seem like an inspired young musician.

February 11, 2012 at 11:48 PM · I relate. Playing with other people helps me. Sometimes, too much time to myself makes the music completely meaningless. And what point is there in practicing meaninglessness? Play with others, and also practice making yourself pick up your instrument with no obligation other than to enjoy the sound. Keep in touch with that. Find your self worth somewhere other than the violin, or it will always abuse you.

For your physical well-being, take 2000 mg vitamin D and 1200 mg fish oil. Every day. Fish oil has been proven to help keep you sane. And you and I are definitely not getting enough sunshine this time of year. Also, pursue 20 minutes of daily exercise to get your heart rate up and oxygen to your mind. It's very hard to do when your heart weighs a ton, but it always weighs a little less afterward. These three things will do some serious battle with depression, I promise!

Lastly, here's some of my mother's advice, which she says every time I tell her I'm depressed or lonely. She tells me to go find someone else to care about and do something to help someone else. It keeps you from dwelling on yourself, and you will always feel better when you contribute something good to the world.

You'll make it through this slump, but you will have to fight to survive. Be strong and of good courage!

February 12, 2012 at 12:00 AM · Hunter, I notice you play the viola...I have read that C is the resonant frequency of the universe, 355 octaves below the C on your viola..lucky you!

February 12, 2012 at 02:44 AM · Hi Hunter,

Tough spot to be in. Hope you get enough sleep, as for me sleep deprivation takes away the energy and the motivation. On the other hand some people with depression sleep extra-ordinary amounts of time as the constant mental struggle exhausts them so much, or they feel they can't face another day and have no energy or motivation left to get out of bed. Nevertheless it is usually best to get up anyway, and physical activity often helps.

Do you have a pet, or maybe your neighbors do? Walking a dog who thinks going out with you is the best thing in the world can lift your mood also.

Playing music together with others is an excellent idea. If no one is around to join: you could try looking up some of your favorite music on YouTube and play along.

Take care.

February 12, 2012 at 04:11 AM · Hi Lyndon,

Nice day to you too.

Hunter has a bit of a history on this forum that you are obviously not aware of. You are quite right that he should seek the help of a mental health professional and this has been suggested over and over and over. But in the end that is his decision and we are just trying to be his friends. The advice here is not at all "wacked" as the people advising here either have had direct or indirect involvement with depression and/or are in the medical field. For me it's both.

People with depression may go through periods where they are living from day to day or even moment to moment and sometimes just that little bit of support, or following an idea that is do-able under the circumstances can make a difference.

February 12, 2012 at 04:13 AM · lyndon,

yes i should probably get pro help but the last time it was forced onto me and they said that they would have to tell my parents so i dont really trust teh mental health profession. should i get help? yes. will i? probably not. playing is like my meds, it keeps me from doing stuff that i used to do that was really really dumb and the reason i started this thread was to try and get help to keep playing to stay out of some of my past behaviors.

February 12, 2012 at 05:01 AM · Hunter, you have posted other disturbing things in the past (e.g., the thread you started on November 6, 2011) and it's pretty clear you need to talk to a professional. There are counselors you can talk to for free (at your school, church, etc.) and you really cannot put this off any longer. Don't let a prior negative experience with a counselor dissuade you.

February 12, 2012 at 06:23 AM · Hunter,

I'm not an expert, but every time when I lose my focus and interest on music, it always has something to do with goal-setting. For me, having a desire goal always keeps me motivated and want to do more.

February 12, 2012 at 09:34 AM · For me it is all about the teacher - without my lessons I lose motivation, without the right teacher I lose motivation too. You have the right teacher when you look forward to every single lesson and you generally have a great time then. I find that as long as the lessons are fun I am motivated - of course sometimes there will be a week when I do not pick up the instrument at all. Very rarely, but I let it happen and to my suprise it helps, it is like my body tells me to rest and do something else for a while.

Now about playing at home, for yourself: Start with practicing scales etc. for about one hour. You set the alarm on your phone, and you do not leave the room before the hour is over. Then you just keep practicing even though it might be annoying. Afterwards you will certainly be motivated when you notice how much easier it is to play the music you wanted to.

Sadly, I often pick up the instrument and start playing difficult pieces right away or after only few minutes of practicing. I then need to stop playing and start all over again, with practicing. Otherwise I will get angry because it won't work that way.

February 12, 2012 at 10:44 AM · I think it is just part of being in the creative arts. When I started out, if a performance of one of my compositions was badly received I got depressed. If a composition was well received I got even more depressed.

Even though I studied classical piano and played Liszt in college recitals, I developed such fear that I could not even play the most simple popular song to very close friends in private. However that bad phase passed and fortunately I do not know what the phrasal verb "to give up" means.

What helped me was reading; I used to read biographies of successful creative people, visual artists, musicians, song writers film stars etc.

Maybe if you looked upon music as a job and had some other interest as a sanctuary it would take the pressure off your playing. I am not saying what I have written will help but it may do.

February 12, 2012 at 12:25 PM · Requirements for a healthy mind and body when playing the violin:Good posture, correct equipment to achieve good posture, to play with less tension and strain, good technique, diet and exercise and love.

In the words of God "the greatest of these is love". The thing is, if a few of these requirements are missing than you are not going to love playing the violin.

I cannot strease enough how important diet and exercise is to a musician. It needs to be in the forefront of our daily routine. If your are suffering from depression and anxiety than it is even more, more, and more important. The problem is when you are suffering from depression, being tired a lot is also tied with it, so you are not going to have the energy to eat well or exercise. What's going to happen is your symptoms are more than likely going to get worse than better.

2 of the worse foods that may(may?, everybody's body is different)cause depression, anxiety and lack of energy.

1)White refined sugar- take it out of your diet as much as possible. Sugar is the worse food item a young musician can eat.

2)caffeine - the excessive use of the combination of sugar and caffeine will drive you insane over time.

Foods that I eat on a regular basis to calm and strengthen the mind to handle stress and improve my playing:

honey, salmon,sage, walnuts, flax seed , almond milk(or almonds),2 cloves of garlic before breakfast(once in a while if you have sugar cravings), tahini, olive oil.

When I do a search online of the health associations e.g. cancer, diabetes, alzhiemers, autoimmune diseases etc... I found that there was a recurring theme. Diet was always one of the things you could alter in your life to prevent the dicease from happening or lessen the degree of severity.

List of foods that will cause disease and weaken the mind:

over processed food , white sugar , excessive caffeine,white bread , white rice, overcooked pasta, overcooked foods, precessed meats, saturated fats, hydrogenated foods, junk foods in general,chlorinated water, butter.

List of foods that will prevent disease and give you a strong mind:

salmon,spinach,berries, fruits, broccoli,green vegetables , eggs, honey, garlic, nuts seeds, olive oil,tahini, ginger, chicken soup, walnuts , flax seed, almond milk 80% chocolate, sunflower seeds, yogurt

I really believe in what Dr. Amens says about the mind and how to make it strong.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kacZ7eWpe8k&feature=related

A strong diet will improve intonation , sight reading, memory, short term memory, lessen mistakes and help with performance anxiety.

February 12, 2012 at 08:27 PM · thank you. it seems like the bad days come and go and i started this thread and the other "scary" ones on bad days cuz i needed some advice. ive been forcing myself to play and it seems like the bad days arent gonna b here for awhile. but my instructor says my expections of myself are much to strict (ie. expecting myself to perform Bach perfectly on a warm up). what is a good way to set goals that are demanding but not impossible?

February 12, 2012 at 08:59 PM · Kristian - "Now about playing at home, for yourself: Start with practicing scales etc. for about one hour. You set the alarm on your phone, and you do not leave the room before the hour is over. Then you just keep practicing even though it might be annoying."

This is a mindless way to work and will do a lot more harm than good.

Work must always be consructive and have a goal. Just playing anything for an hour is a silly waste of time. This is extremely bad advice to be giving out.

February 13, 2012 at 05:47 PM · Hi, Hunter: I couldn't add much better advice than what you've gotten so far here. Depression (or sadness) is one of the most basic but uncomfortable emotions we human beings get - both on a daily basis over small things and in a big way over big things.

But what we call 'depression' is like a stomach ache - it can be caused by any variety of reasons (from physical to emotional to situational). The diagnosis du jour these days is Clinical Depression, but not everyone who is depressed or goes through periods of intense sadness is clinically depressed. One of our faculty here at IIT (Dr. Michael Young) is an expert on seasonal depression, and he agrees that every individual is different; once size does not fit all.

As others above have so beautifully and specifically indicated, playing the violin requires constant work at the craft of playing. If it's something you want to master, you've got to find a way that works for you to do the things you need to do routinely without letting your mood or how you feel about things keep you from taking action.

Enthusiasm, interest, and optimism are wonderful motivators, but NOT what you can rely on to do the daily chores required to master the violin. You've got to rely on the decision to do what you need to do, regardless of how you feel about it. That will not only help you master the fiddle, but also help you gain a degree of self-control over your choices. And that's pretty important in lots of areas of life, and for lots of reasons.

Hope that helps.

Sandy

February 13, 2012 at 05:48 PM · Hi, Hunter: I couldn't add much better advice than what you've gotten so far here. Depression (or sadness) is one of the most basic but uncomfortable emotions we human beings get - both on a daily basis over small things and in a big way over big things.

But what we call 'depression' is like a stomach ache - it can be caused by any variety of reasons (from physical to emotional to situational). The diagnosis du jour these days is Clinical Depression, but not everyone who is depressed or goes through periods of intense sadness is clinically depressed. One of our faculty here at IIT (Dr. Michael Young) is an expert on seasonal depression, and he agrees that every individual is different; once size does not fit all.

As others above have so beautifully and specifically indicated, playing the violin requires constant work at the craft of playing. If it's something you want to master, you've got to find a way that works for you to do the things you need to do routinely without letting your mood or how you feel about things keep you from taking action.

Enthusiasm, interest, and optimism are wonderful motivators, but NOT what you can rely on to do the daily chores required to master the violin. You've got to rely on the decision to do what you need to do, regardless of how you feel about it. That will not only help you master the fiddle, but also help you gain a degree of self-control over your choices. And that's pretty important in lots of areas of life, and for lots of reasons.

Hope that helps.

Sandy

February 13, 2012 at 07:00 PM · Good advice there. I was depressed after losing my wife of 42 years to Lung Cancer last year. Time heals. Regular exercise is also a wonderful help for depression. Try it and you might be pleasantly surprised. Beats the heck out of pills.

February 13, 2012 at 07:09 PM · Peter, I did not suggest playing anything for one hour, mindlessly. Of course the exercises need to fit and one has to concentrate in order to make progress. What I wanted to explain ist that a playing-session can be much more fun if you do a lot of exercises prior to it - students know this and sometimes they try to practice as little as possible nevertheless, the want to just play the "real" music.

February 13, 2012 at 07:59 PM · sandy, you're a real wise guy...and I mean that truly. It's good to have someone on here with real knowledge about these situations, and good sense about what it takes to be a musician.

February 13, 2012 at 08:07 PM · Hi, Hunter. I play viola, too.

All this advice looks really useful, even when it is contradictory! Diet, goals, mindless excercise, altruism. May I just copy & paste what I wrote in another thread..

"All I can suggest off the cuff is to gently retrace the steps which brought you to love the music and the viola: memories, recordings, early pieces etc.

Take up the instrument, and pretend to start again, slowly: you should soon find how much you have not in fact lost, and be able to piece your playing together again. Try not to set any goals in advance, but just retrace the path you trod, and maybe replace the less good bits.

Start very small then let your playing grow without rushing it.

Try Irish balads with no vibrato but with a gentle, caressing bow; try dance movements more slowly than usual but with detatched, pearly strokes.

In other words, try to recover the sheer pleasure of holding, stroking, and sending small, smiling tones out of this maddening instrument. Cajole it into singing for you..."

So I am suggesting the exact opposite of goal-setting: a gentle, rather more sensual approach, rebuilding yourself rather than trying deperately to "snap out of it", or "get a move on".

One can discuss and play music with others, but music can also be our secret garden, where we only invite very special people, those who won't trample the best of ourselves underfoot!

"..best I can do for now.."

Adrian

February 13, 2012 at 08:16 PM · Hunter,

There are a few things I wish I had realized back in high school or earlier. For me (and I think for others), yoga, other exercise and counseling/therapy with a trusted person has benefited me greatly, in the sense that it has let me get out of my own way and understand myself better. While I would definitely recommend all three to you, the important part is thinking about your mental health as an ongoing process, and figuring out things that work for you (I don't mean drugs). The earlier in life that you decide to start tackling this sort of thing, the greater the benefits will be. It's sort of like violin in that way. If you have previously had a counselor that you were not comfortable with, ask an adult you trust about helping you find another counselor, or go looking elsewhere.

February 13, 2012 at 09:52 PM · "yes i should probably get pro help but the last time it was forced onto me and they said that they would have to tell my parents so i dont really trust teh mental health profession. should i get help? yes. will i? probably not."

Hi again, Hunter. There's been lot of good advice already.

In a previous thread, you mentioned reluctance to have your parents involved in your challenges, because your Dad has some major military accomplishments.

I said it then, and I'll repeat it: Military success relies on a proper support system. The support system you need may be of a slightly different flavor from your Dad's, but let's hope that he can still understand the concept.

If not, I'll be happy to talk to him.

February 14, 2012 at 06:27 PM · "… if you have any tips on how to stay motivated, please help me out and tell me."

I've found God's Word to be my lifeline in sorrow and happiness alike; so I make it a point to spend time, alone, reading it early each morning and again each evening -- whether I'm facing a crisis or not.

What started me doing it? Well, at 16, I thought life was getting to be too much for me; I felt trapped in some mental black hole. This is far more common among teens than I realized back then. When I poured out my story to the school's head administrator, he recommended spending time each day with the Word. It worked for him. And it worked for me.

I know from experience the value of what Emily's mom recommended -- finding others to care about and doing something for them. This helped me a lot during several interstate moves. When I was by myself, the gloom wrapped itself around me. But when I could interact with others and do something for them, the depression broke.

And I count my blessings -- often. Maybe life isn't all I'd like it to be at the moment. But it could always be so much worse. I ask myself: "Can you hear, see, sit, stand, walk, coordinate, balance? Can you access v.com? Can you practice? Can you fall asleep each night?" Then I'll say, "Well, thank God for all these blessings -- and consider how much harder life would be without just one of them."

February 14, 2012 at 08:19 PM · Adrian, I think you've nailed it. Sometimes I find it hard to pick up my violin, and the thought of half an hour of nothing more than exercises is more than I can take. But if I can persuade myself to just play a scale or two as a minimalist warmup, then ease into a simple melody or two, I soon find my spirit starting to rise. It's important not to force it, though. As often as not, I'll pick up the pace naturally. Perhaps the random melody I chose needs a bit of technical work, but by this time I'm usually interested enough to do an exercise or two before continuing. As often as not, my initial lack of enthusiasm turns around enough that I wind up with a good practice session after all. All it takes is a gentle push - with the emphasis on gentle - to get started.

February 15, 2012 at 01:42 AM · I know several people who've successfully addressed depression with exercise.

Here's a form of exercise that can take 15 minutes a week. I haven't tried it yet, but I've found a lot of stuff on mercola to be pretty good. I'm intending to try this sometime in the near future...

http://fitness.mercola.com/sites/fitness/archive/2012/01/06/dr-doug-mcguff-on-exercise.aspx

February 16, 2012 at 12:29 AM · i cant bring myself to play. i triid but i cant. im losing it. i get depressed more and more. i cant play anymore................

February 16, 2012 at 09:37 AM · Try reading Body Mind Mastery by Dan Millman. It is good for all life, not just your career or studies.

February 16, 2012 at 01:06 PM · Hunter, you've heard from a few mental health professionals here, and I'm another one of them, and you seriously need to listen to the people saying that this is not about your lack of motivation for the violin.

You have depression, and lack of motivation and inability to anticipate pleasure are annoying, but they only symptomatic of a whole cluster of things that are going on chemically, biologically, and emotionally. Stop fiddle arsing around the edges and treat the cause, man.

You need to get assistance - is there a specialised youth mental health service where you could approach for professional advice ? - I know that here in Australia medical services are provided confidentially for people aged over 14. I've never known anyone to successfully treat depression on their own, you need allies and knowledge and at the moment you're not sounding very convincing that you have either.

I seriously doubt (I sincerely HOPE) that your parents are clueless to something being wrong, and they must be worried sick about what this beast is and what they can do to help you, yet you refuse to trust and honour them with the knowledge of what is happening to you.

Regardless of your age, any professional is bound - by law - to report appropriately if they believe you are at risk. that is to stop people topping themselves whilst in the depths of a treatable condition, that once treated they will recover and enjoy and want to live. so yes you should seek professional help, and yes that professional may end up having to notify, but because they want to see you recover, not to punish you or ridicule you.

Best of efforts now, Hunter.

February 16, 2012 at 01:08 PM · Hunter: If you simply can't do it, then don't. It's not the end of the world. There are thousands of things to do in this world, and perhaps you haven't found your path yet. Don't despair about that. It will be all the better when you find your path, and no one can tell you what that is or isn't, or when the door will open. And since you are unique and the only you who has ever been, treat it as a journey and an adventure, because that's what life is. We never know what is around the corner - the good, the bad, the ugly, and the beautiful. Whether or not the violin is part of it, you clearly have lots and lots of support from the good people who contribute to violinist.com.

Cheers,

Sandy

February 16, 2012 at 05:47 PM · >I know several people who've successfully addressed depression with exercise.

I'm one of them. Hunter, GET OUT there and exercise. Seriously. Gripe all you want, but take a walk that gets your heart rate up there and stays up, for 20-30 minutes. Do it. Depression leaches any desire to do anything but stay in bed, but DO IT. It produces endorphins that I call Nature's antidepressants.

I agree that the violin issue is secondary. Although I can well understand your grief there. Your sanctuary has been raided, and you can't turn there anymore. It's not nourishing you like it used to. You can't force it back or will it back. Walk away from it - don't punish yourself further. If it is a true calling, it will call you back. If it isn't, holding onto it won't help. That, too, is a cause of depression: fear of letting go of something that no longer works, terrified of the abyss that lies beyond it. But at some point you have to take a leap of faith and trust that the next sanctuary will present itself to you. Or your feelings for playing the violin will return. But only AFTER you've let go of it all.

The exercise thing is crucial. Push past any unwillingness to do it. It can become its own sanctuary for you. (Trust me, like I said, I suffer from this too, and some days my best mood is after I've forced myself to put 45 min into exercise. Like, um, all this week. Maybe all this month.)

I'm not a mental health professional, just someone reporting from the trenches. And my heart goes out to you. The lousiest thing is being in one's teens and early 20's and not knowing how to deal with this monster. The best thing about being in one's late 40's is seeing the monster for what it is, and realizing it's a separate entity, one you can manage. (Sandy, Christian and others, have already elaborated on this wonderfully.)

Just trust that the music will return to your life, in some form or another, when the time is right (for the muse, unfortunately, and not for you!).

February 16, 2012 at 07:15 PM · Hunter, I was reading an article recently in the local newspaper about teens and depression. They quoted a mental health professional as saying that ANY parent would much rather get a phone call that their kid needs an evaluation and help than a phone call telling them that their kid has tried to or succeeded in hurting him/herself. THIS INCLUDES YOUR PARENTS. I have teens. It's true.

Don't let fear of your folks keep you from getting help. Running interference with family is part of the job for anyone who works with adolescents. Depression is not a moral failing or sign of weakness; it is an illness. It can be treated.

February 16, 2012 at 07:19 PM · Hello Hunter,

I promised to myself to do the least possible violinist.com these days because I used to come too much here and I'm in difficult studies right now. (difficult studies to help people like you and everyone who struggles, for a reason or another to keep up with this life, it's burdens but also it's pleasures. I include myself in this too as school crush very much the rest of my life and passions so I always have to dance on the edge of the cliff of health vs unhealthy/unhapiness : )

I'm finishing now my mental health section of the course and we learn many factual, up to date knowledge about how to treat depression and such. I just want to share a bit of what we learned about depression (for everyone's information not just you even if I say "you")

Over the years, there have been many ways and suggestions to cure depression (btw, depression is not a negative thing, many people will experience it, it has nothing to do with lack of will, laziness or weakness) Many great scientists and public people suffered from depression and WERE GREAT! Not to say that it's not painful though. That's why it's so important to get some help. You don't have to carry this bullet stoping you from going forward and stealing every bit of hapiness from you. You deserve better so pls trust people around you that could make a difference, really.

To this day, many many studies go towards what Terez told. Even if it's painful, you must go out there and do something the soonest possible. The longer you'll stay in that "waiting" state, the longer it will take you to recover and take control of your life again.

Ideally, you should try something completely knew and fresh. It's really not a good idea to return to something you know very well as violin because it may be too painful now. As a wond, it must heal a bit... You don't want to get distroyed by what you love most right?

When the rest of your life will feel better, you may feel sooooooo motivated and anxious to go back to violin that it will be an incredible productive and creative force plenty worthy to have waited for. (but you have to take care of the rest before...)

You know, many musicians and composers get/got their wonderful musical inspiration from what happened in "the rest of their life" and they put this in their music. That's why one must not neglect the non-musical things in their lives...

Also, many great violinists had to take breaks through their careers too. I can just state Fritz Kreisler's example... He was very upset about not making it for Vienna's orchestra and didn't touch to his violin for a few years. Yet, he was as solid as ever when he came back after.

As much as this community can be great, real life is still outside. Go out there and don't be afraid to meet knew people, try knew things. We are sociable beeings and although we can lie to ourselves and tell we don't need anyone, it's just not true.

No musical instrument can give what you'll get with wonderful friendships (human and animal), activities with those who count the most for you etc. I agree music is just as strong, beautiful and a part of you but you have to feed this musical bond with these non-musical things or otherwise, your musical "ship" will sink...

No one is you or can live your life for you. But if you put your confidence in people around you who can help you, and accept that help, you may turn yourself on for something really exciting for the rest of your life!

Just my two cents...

Anne-Marie

February 18, 2012 at 12:35 AM · i want to play. but i cant. idk what is wrong with me. why cant i play anymore?does this happen 2 everyone?

February 18, 2012 at 04:14 PM · Hi Hunter,

Every artist has this problem, I mean pearlman once said in an interview that he feels inferior to hiefez! Music can only be for good if it makes the world better and helps and inspires the people that you play for. Try playing for people that you love and care for in concerts. If you put your entire soul into music, your playing can change people, and that will help you find a reason to go on.

February 23, 2012 at 11:11 AM · Hunter,

Just as a broken leg must be immobilised to mend sufficiently before hard exercise can complete the healing, so a damaged soul needs much gentle patience before it can cope with the trials that life - that is to say, other people! - impose on us.

In your the secret garden of your mind, cultivate delicate and exotic things; when you (have to) venture outside, try to produce what seems to be expected of you: tougher, more ordinary plants which can survive in a more arid soil.

Only invite inside those you can trust entirely: friends, distant family, and those of a similar age whose intensely-felt posts show a similar vulnerability.

Adrian

February 23, 2012 at 06:42 PM · >i want to play. but i cant. idk what is wrong with me. why cant i play anymore?does this happen 2 everyone?

Um, are you even bothering to read these extended, thoughtful replies and suggestions people are offering you? Give it a try, please. We certainly are trying.

February 23, 2012 at 07:07 PM · There are the normal ups and downs we all experience. When we're feeling low, we're depressed. Or if a large, negative event occurs; such as we lose a job, we move somewhere we don't want to move to, we get divorced or sever a relationship, or someone dies, etc....we're depressed.

THEN there's clinical depression. And like any other chronic health issue, such as diabetes, it won't just go away if left untreated.

It can certainly be managed, often without drugs, but it needs a concrete plan set out by someone experienced in treating it.

There is no shame in going to a doctor for help...and the sooner you go, hopefully the sooner you'll be back on your feet and able to manage.

It's your life and it's up to you - no one can make you do anything you don't want to. But frankly, I'd rather be happy and enjoying life than unwilling to ask for help.

February 24, 2012 at 12:28 AM · Hunter, what stands out to me from several threads is that nobody here can solve your dilemmas remotely, unless you will be a willing partner in the solution. I'm detecting some reticence on your part.

It's good that you're sharing your feelings though. That's a sign of hope, as opposed to something insurmountable.

One of your threads mentioned suicide. Get professional help. Get professional help. You are too valuable to lose.

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