Maximal violin storrage temperature

July 5, 2010 at 06:07 PM ·

Hello folks!

I got a question. Well it's summer again and I'm going to france on hollidays! Camping! (Caravan) And of course I'm taking my violin with me. But the violin will be stored in the car which is parked in the sun (no other possibilty..) and so it gets very hot. (Like 40-50° inside I guess) 

I Don't want my violin to stay in the caravan, because it's not very safe. The car is safer (volvo) :D

So can I store the violin in the car or will it be damaged by the high temperature..? Thanks in advance for answers!

 

Greetings, Flo

Replies (20)

July 5, 2010 at 06:17 PM ·

Don't do it. It is very risky as the heat will open the instrument up and it could suffer even worse damage, like cracks and splits. (Unless you mean in the hours of darkness of course).

July 5, 2010 at 06:37 PM ·

 I agree with Peter, DO NOT DO IT! strap the violin to your waist and take it everywhere if necessary but DO NOT leave it in the car!!! or don't take it full stop, it's not worth it, very likely to get damaged!!! if the temperature is 30 degree celsius outside it can be at least 50 or a lot higher in the car when it's not been driven and no air con is on etc.

July 5, 2010 at 06:39 PM ·

 Again: Don't put your violin at such a risk!

July 5, 2010 at 06:40 PM ·

Don't even consider it.

July 5, 2010 at 07:22 PM ·

Go look at some junk shops - there is a good chance you will find an old violin that is still functional.  Set it up yourself and take that....

I could not do that to my violin - I'd rather sit in the trunk myself...

July 5, 2010 at 07:34 PM ·

Ok thanks a lot for the answers and suggestions! I'll look for another possibility then..! I don't want my violin to suffer! :>

Greetings, Flo

July 5, 2010 at 07:42 PM ·

 Hi- When I was a senior in high school, I left my violin in the trunk of the car while I went to a movie with friends. Later, when I opened the case, every bit of glue had melted, and the violin was in pieces. Since then, I always take my violin to the movies, concerts, restaurants, shopping, et alia. It is only left by itself inside my apartment. I never take my eyes off it during rehearsal breaks, at jobs, or anywhere else. I won't  even leave it in my room at a five star hotel. If I ask at a hotel if there's a safe that can hold a violin, there word is out: there may be a good violin in room such and such. When Yo-Yo Ma stayed in the same hotel I have in mind (Wheatleigh, in Lennox, Mass. Wonderful place) he brought a guard for his cello.   Charles Johnston

July 5, 2010 at 07:49 PM ·

 I wish I could afford my own guard for my violin (hey ho), but if I could I probably would! violin's far too precious!!!

July 5, 2010 at 09:25 PM ·

  Charles, I my cello was the "Davidoff" I would not only bring a guard, but also a couple of ex-marines.

July 7, 2010 at 11:38 PM ·

 Last night I had a teenaged student walk in and announce that he had discovered that rosin melts.  I stared at him and asked where his fiddle was at the time this had happened.  Same case, of course, in the car.  This is Texas, summertime.  Somehow the glue was intact and the fiddle (a decent old Hopf) was fine.  I explained to him about hide glue and I hope he got the message.  We'll see...

 

July 8, 2010 at 04:13 PM ·

Ouch!  I cringe even THINKING about it!!!

The temperature here (Northern Indiana) has been in the high 80's(F)/low 90's(F) for the past several days, with humidity around 75-85%.  When I take my violin out of the house, I first go out (without the violin) and open up the car, start the air conditioning, put down a double-layer of thick terry-cloth towel (white) in case the seat is hot, go back into the house and get the violin, place it on top of the double-layer of towel, and cover it with another white towel.  This is for a 10-15 minute trip to my lesson.  My family considers me the OCD poster child, but I love my violin too much to take any risks.

If you must take a violin on the trip, I agree with the writer who recommended taking a "beater" violin.  Even then, I'd invest in the best-insulated case I could afford, perhaps make an additional cover (big drawstring bag??) out of white toweling to help repel radiant heat from the sun, and keep the violin with me at all times -- not left in the car!   

July 8, 2010 at 05:13 PM ·

It's probably worth purchasing a, erm, "less-good" violin for the occasion. My violin is once in awhile conveyed around in a vehicle for long periods of time, sometimes left sitting out in the summer weather (80-90 F at times) for 6-8 hours at a time. I care way to much about my "good" violin to leave it in the trunk of the car, so I bought Shar's Carlo Lamberti Model AV1000 which I consider my "cheap enough to leave in the car, but not so cheap it sounds like crap" instrument. I purchased this instrument in 2008, and now two years later it is pretty much in the same exact condition it was when I got it. It might be worth looking into :)

July 8, 2010 at 06:48 PM ·

I live in France and I have a "violon poubelle" that I use when there is a high risk of damage!

July 8, 2010 at 08:13 PM ·

One of the L&C carbon fibers is a good option for this sort of situation too, depending on how much money you have to spend.

July 8, 2010 at 08:26 PM ·

Lisa - I am curious about the origin of the phrase "violon poubelle."  I know what poubelle means (I lived in France for two years and went to French schools).  Does this mean a violin of such poor quality that you would find it in a trash can, a violin which could be used  as a trash can, or does it have some other origin?

July 9, 2010 at 02:27 PM ·

 I had the impression that it originated from the sense of "rusty container"  to describe a delapidated ship as in bateau poubelle, so referring to the thing itself, and that usage such as "chaine poubelle = trash TV" is more recent.

July 9, 2010 at 03:37 PM ·

Thanks, Nigel.

December 12, 2014 at 03:05 AM · I'm very aware of that challenge,because we just experienced a time when we practically lived out of our suitcases,at campgrounds and hotels. What i found is that there is a big diffence between a van and a regular car. The van was much less hot. I was able to keep the violin in the car while put it in a sleepingbag and also covering it with more blankets.and put it down more low. The other day i.had to take my violin also with me to a fieldtrip,so I took my downfeather bed cover with me and also was glad i.could park in the shade. (Though the shade can travel away. If i haven't. to leave my violin in the car I always cover it with lots of stuff.and i keep checking on it,if it is a hot day,but i sure try to.avoid it as much.as possible.

December 14, 2014 at 12:24 AM · Apart from anything else my instrument is not covered by my insurance if it is left in my car.

December 14, 2014 at 12:24 AM · Apart from anything else my instrument is not covered by my insurance if it is left in my car.

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