String Tube?

April 6, 2009 at 03:54 AM ·

I just ordered one of the Bobelock Halfmoon fiberglass cases and it comes with a string tube. I was wondering what it's used for and tried searching online for some information. I found one other site where this was brought up but noone really knew.

I know that some gut strings come in tubes rather then coiled. It's best to keep any extra gut strings in your case uncoiled and in a tube. But what about synthetic strings? I heard these are best kept in their paper cases in the case and that if put in the string tube they react with the plastic and deteriorate. Is that true? I use Thomastik Dominants and plan on sticking an extra set in my case just in... case. Anyone have any knowledge they want to share?

Replies (22)

April 6, 2009 at 04:12 AM ·

I never use the string tube, as cool as the idea of it is!

April 6, 2009 at 05:51 AM ·

I always keep a spare set of dominants and a few extra Gold label  E's in the tube no problems... 

When i was younger  i recall .... dominant strings  also  came packaged in bulk  like gut strings (uncoiled)  in the shoppe  display  out of a thick glass tube  jar with a lil label on the ball end.

 

April 6, 2009 at 05:47 AM ·

Well if you use pre-packaged strings it really has no use, but if you have a penchant for Eudoxas or Olivs, how else can you keep an extra set of strings with you

April 6, 2009 at 10:19 AM ·

I can't see them making any difference unless the tube keeps a better constant humidity % for real gut strings??? And that doesn't make any since either.  A case humidifier sould do that. I think it's just for aesthetics, it somehow looks cool.

royce

April 6, 2009 at 12:33 PM ·

Well, if not used to store strings, I suppose it could be used to shoot spitballs at the cello section

April 6, 2009 at 12:55 PM ·

Sam - a technical posting question: how did you post the photo here?

April 6, 2009 at 02:44 PM ·

Good question, how do you post the pictures?

April 6, 2009 at 03:58 PM ·

I didn't know you could post pics either...testing...

 

...nope...test failed...

April 6, 2009 at 05:29 PM ·

Hey Seth- I have good friends here in Wyoming from Stuben and Bar Harbor.  One use to own the Golden Anchor and whale sight seeing tours.  Have you ever been to Geddy's?

April 7, 2009 at 12:27 AM ·

First of all, the image has to be stored some where and accessible from here. Then use html tag

<img src=" image location">

April 7, 2009 at 04:07 AM ·

Attaching a photo? Quite simple really...

It's all about the mouse

  1. right click photo
  2. left click "save"
  3. left click "paste"

computer mouse next to cartoon mouse animated gif

April 7, 2009 at 10:18 AM ·

Hmmm...when I right-click on a photo, "save" is not among the options I get.

BTW, back on topic, they are designed to hold those gut strings that come in an uncoiled version. What I've done in a couple of my cases is punch holes in the tube with a hammer and nail - not easy! - and put 1 or 2 dampits into the tube, b.c. I didn't want them moving around in my violin. This way, some moisture slowly escapes into the case This was before "strettos", which I'm not totally crazy about either. In that regard, the easiest thing in those cases with a bult-in space for it, is a small water bottle.

April 7, 2009 at 02:01 PM ·

Speaking of humidifiers, I just bought an Oasis. $20, they're amazing. They make ones that go in the case. They're small, cheap, and work well.

April 7, 2009 at 03:01 PM ·

Not very helpful advice in this situation, but I know someone who keeps peppermints in her string tube...

April 7, 2009 at 04:53 PM ·

Raphael, use the toolbar of your browser on the top and view the page source of Sam's post, you'll find img src="http://www.animationplayhouse.com/Mouse-mouse.gif" as I mentioned in my previous post.

April 7, 2009 at 05:10 PM ·

I use the tube to store all my pre-stretched gut strings. If you want to attach photos, use Window Internet Explorer, Mozilla Firefox won't work.


April 9, 2009 at 01:19 PM ·

I

November 2, 2010 at 05:34 AM ·

I've always wonder the same questions, and since I never use gut strings then the tube is gonna be useless?!

I just wonder if it's better if I store new strings in the tube or put it in the original paper package?

November 2, 2010 at 08:13 AM ·

 I drilled holes in mine and I put dampits in there for humidity.

November 2, 2010 at 08:52 AM ·

I did that too Michael - but when I discussed it on a topic here I was advised that it was a bad idea - the danger is that the humidity could get too high and damage the violin.  Are you in a particularly low humidity area?

November 2, 2010 at 11:13 PM ·

If the string tube is plactic, simply heat a pin with a match (make certain you are wearing a glove or something, so the pin doesn't burn your fingers), then it can easily push through the tube. instead of a match, a candle can keep the pin hot enough to make a number of holes (heat pin, make holes until it stops penetrating, re-heat, repeat.

November 6, 2010 at 03:40 PM ·

Better yet, hold the pin with needle nose pliers.

This discussion has been archived and is no longer accepting responses.

Facebook Twitter YouTube Instagram Email

Violinist.com is made possible by...

Shar Music
Shar Music

Yamaha Silent Violin
Yamaha Silent Violin

Pirastro Strings
Pirastro Strings

Find a Summer Music Program
Find a Summer Music Program

Dimitri Musafia, Master Maker of Violin and Viola Cases
Dimitri Musafia, Master Maker of Violin and Viola Cases

Violinist.com Business Directory
Violinist.com Business Directory

Violinist.com Guide to Online Learning
Violinist.com Guide to Online Learning

Dominant Pro Strings

Antonio Strad Violin

Bay Fine Strings Violin Shop

Bobelock Cases

Fiddlerman.com

Fiddlershop

Los Angeles Violin Shop

Nazareth Gevorkian Violins

Violin-Strings.com

Metzler Violin Shop

Leatherwood Bespoke Rosin

Warchal

Barenreiter

Johnson String Instrument and Carriage House Violins

Potter Violins

String Masters

Bein & Company

Annapolis Bows & Violins

Laurie's Books

Discover the best of Violinist.com in these collections of editor Laurie Niles' exclusive interviews.

Violinist.com Interviews Volume 1
Violinist.com Interviews Volume 1, with introduction by Hilary Hahn

Violinist.com Interviews Volume 2
Violinist.com Interviews Volume 2, with introduction by Rachel Barton Pine

Subscribe