Auer's Violin Playing As I Teach It - the PDF!

December 19, 2008 at 07:20 AM ·

I'd always been breathlessly awaiting Project Gutenberg getting around to Auer's Violin Playing As I Teach It.  But Google Books did it first.  The link below opens in Google Books' reading interface, but there is a link to the PDF or the text on the page.

Violin Playing As I Teach It

Replies (29)

December 19, 2008 at 08:03 AM ·

Awesome...Thanks so much for sharing!

December 19, 2008 at 08:44 AM ·

Can someone please link me to the pdf? i can't find it in the google book page and I have no clue how to view it either! Sorry!

December 19, 2008 at 04:18 PM ·

I'm not seeing any way to open it as a pdf either.

December 19, 2008 at 04:31 PM ·

In my browser, from left to right, there is the reading window, a scroll bar, and a sidebar.  The PDF link is at the top of the sidebar.  I was wondering if it made a difference depending on whether you were logged into Google, so I logged out, but the PDF link still appears on my page.  Hmm.

The PDF is a download link rather than a link that appears in my browser window, so the URL is a little harder to capture; let me get it from the page source later today.

December 19, 2008 at 05:44 PM ·

 

Logged in or not, I get the reading window, scroll bar & side bar but no pdf link.  Also, that book (along w/ 6 Lessons With Yehudi Menuhin) are listed at Google books as being available with only a limited preview. You don’t get the entire text in the reading window (do you, Bill?).
 
Woulda been nice, tho'.
 
ps- which browser are you using?

December 19, 2008 at 06:10 PM ·

I was able to read the whole thing.  I just went back there to see if things changed, like if they were tweaking permissions on the book.  I could read from throughout the book.  But when I did the Google search on the title (that originally led me to the book), instead of the reading page I had originally gotten, I got an about page with no obvious way to get to the book.

The book is Copyright 1921, and all US books prior to 1923 have expired copyright, if you believe Wikipedia, so that shouldn't be the problem.

December 19, 2008 at 06:12 PM ·

Here is the download link.

December 19, 2008 at 08:49 PM ·

"

Not Found

The requested URL /books/pdf/Violin_Playing_as_I_Teach_it.pdf?id=Td8PAAAAYAAJ&output=pdf&sig=ACfU3U2h07SN-9EGCowxZoQyCbXwAq5S2w was not found on this server. "

 

oh well, thanks for trying!

December 19, 2008 at 09:45 PM ·

The 2nd link you posted worked for me... thanks, Bill!

December 19, 2008 at 10:11 PM ·

Thanks for trying Bill!  I got an error on the 2nd link as well :(

 

December 20, 2008 at 01:19 AM ·

Bill's link worked for me, FWIW.

December 20, 2008 at 03:13 AM ·

 Yeah, the link worked for me. Thanks so much! 

December 20, 2008 at 03:38 AM ·

What's wrong with my browsers!!!  I tried firefox and IE both got this error:

 

Google    
Error
 

Not Found

The requested URL /books/pdf/Violin_Playing_as_I_Teach_it.pdf?id=Td8PAAAAYAAJ&output=pdf&sig=ACfU3U2h07SN-9EGCowxZoQyCbXwAq5S2w was not found on this server.

 

December 20, 2008 at 06:58 AM ·

Oooh, how wonderful!  Thanks so much for letting us know about this!

December 20, 2008 at 11:43 AM ·

cannot link or find.  could you please attach it to an email?  thanks.

 

December 20, 2008 at 11:30 PM ·

Thank you! Fortunately, the original link is working for me.

December 22, 2008 at 04:27 AM ·

Greeitngs,

I belive the chapter entitled nuance is the mosyt importnat piec eof writing on music for vionists ever!!!!!!!!!  It should be read everyday along with the funnies and the labelling on your prune can.

Cheers,

Buri

December 24, 2008 at 05:58 AM ·

Bill,

Thank you. I have the book, but now I can forward it on for my studio to read, and read it in bits during my leisure time on the little laptop. (The link downloaded in about 3 seconds automatically––even I could handle that one:-)

Buri,

Thanks for my late-night reading assignment––since you wrote it, I had to check it out. Yes, it should be read by all………but, do I have to eat prunes every time?

I will additionally steer all to the download page 193 (book's pg 160). Paragraph begins, "True inspiration in music,…" 

I keep telling myself to reread the entire book and must do so soon.

Enjoy,

Drew

December 24, 2008 at 09:13 AM ·

Hi!

Just as some others I have not been able to find the book. Now I offer to make the download easily available for all, if someone sends me the file.

This should be legal, because it was said the copyright has expired.

If someone decides to send the file to me, please leave a remark here for others so I won't get multiple copies.

Yours

December 24, 2008 at 09:21 PM ·

This book has been available from Dover Publications a while ago and its reference number is 23917-9. I bought it a couple of years ago in a violin shop. The only difference between the dover book and the PDF is that no photographs were included in the Dover's.

It is interesting to note that Leopold Auer, in his book (PDF pages 32 and 33), emphatically dissuades violinists to use ANY kind of objects (pads, cushions, etc.) beneath the back of the violin and above the shoulder ("these are bad habits ..." Auer says) and clearly suggests the use of the left hand to raise the violin as high as possible. Coming this statement from Heifetz's teacher, are we to take it seriously ?  If we do, then how could one explain the amazing great number of fantastic violinists who do use something beneath the back of the violin, contradicting the old master's advise ? Is Auer right, and wrong at the same time ?

Could Drew Lecher (who seems impressed by this book) make a comment and shed light on this rather controversial subject ?

Merry Christmas to every one !

Juan

 

 

 

January 7, 2009 at 11:01 PM ·

Wow - just stumbled on this thread.  How fortunate to see this!

THANK YOU!!! 

Valerie :)

January 8, 2009 at 09:09 AM ·

Hi,

I just found this link:

http://www.fiddlercove.org/docsfiles

Enjoy,

Tobias

February 23, 2009 at 04:16 AM ·

The last link works fine!

 

Cheers!

 

Hugo

February 23, 2009 at 10:02 AM ·

Unless I just missed it, it seems like you can only view 14 pages of the book online. Is there a link to the entire pdf?

http://books.google.com/books?id=D8V1Naw3Ea4C&printsec=frontcover&source=gbs_book_other_versions_r&cad=2_0

(They have previews of other interesting books online, such as Flesch's The Art of Violin Playing - http://books.google.com/books?id=fCuAux4xHPYC&printsec=frontcover&source=gbs_summary_r&cad=0#PPR3,M1 )

 

March 4, 2009 at 09:47 PM ·

Hi, everybody!

""""It is interesting to note that Leopold Auer, in his book (PDF pages 32 and 33), emphatically dissuades violinists to use ANY kind of objects (pads, cushions, etc.) beneath the back of the violin and above the shoulder ("these are bad habits ..." Auer says) and clearly suggests the use of the left hand to raise the violin as high as possible. Coming this statement from Heifetz's teacher, are we to take it seriously ? If we do, then how could one explain the amazing great number of fantastic violinists who do use something beneath the back of the violin, contradicting the old master's advise ? Is Auer right, and wrong at the same time ?"""

Just a few days ago it happened to me to read (in an old book, published in 1934, when memory of Auer and his students was still "fresh" in Russia), that in his real practic Auer was not at all so strict in this point as one can conclude from pages 32 and 33. Many of his students used cushions or something (among others, Polyakin and Eidlin are mentionned as example).

March 5, 2009 at 04:18 AM ·

"this statement from Heifetz's teacher, are we to take it seriously ?" 

 

Yes I think so.

 

"If we do, then how could one explain the amazing great number of fantastic violinists who do use something beneath the back of the violin, contradicting the old master's advise ? Is Auer right, and wrong at the same time ?" 

He was right in my opinion with regards to the shoulder rest even though there have been some good violinists that do use them.  But can you really say anyone of them truly plays as well in all facets and categories as shoulder restless players like Heifetz, Seidel, Kreisler, Rabin, Perlman, and Stern?  For me each one of those players has their own 'voice' or tone which leads me to my main point  which Auer wrote about. 

His main objection with the cushion or shoulder rest was the amount of sound and ring lost from the shoulder rest.  I think he wrote in his book that some cushions or pads could take away as much as 1/2 of the violin's actual volume.  The modern day Kuns and Mach one  (I've always thought that the name of that shoulder rest sounds more like a razor for shaving) shoulder rests are designed so that A) they clamp the ribs of the instrument inhibiting the violin's natural vibrations and B) have a angle or slope forcing the player to tilt the instrument and play almost hunched over in many cases.   The trajectory of sound with this positioning is far less than that of a player who holds the instrument more flat and parallel to the floor as the f-holes in this flat position (without a shoulder rest) will be pointing more upwards.

"Just a few days ago it happened to me to read (in an old book, published in 1934, when memory of Auer and his students was still "fresh" in Russia), that in his real practice Auer was not at all so strict in this point as one can conclude from pages 32 and 33. Many of his students used cushions or something (among others, Polyakin and Eidlin are mentionned as example)."

 

I know all of  Auer's greatest students (Heifetz, Elman, Seidel, Milstein, Zimbalist, Mischakoff, Rabinoff) did not use shoulder rests nor did they encourage students to use them.  Heifetz I know from my teacher (who was his student) was firmly against the use of shoulder rests.  He said that shoulder rests "mute the tone".   . 

March 5, 2009 at 08:11 AM ·

Well, Polyakin was great, too, and he did ;-) 

March 5, 2009 at 06:12 PM ·

Hi Marina,  I think he was good, but, I would not certainly put him on a level with Heifetz, Milstein, or Seidel.  Just my opinion after listening to his recordings.

March 5, 2009 at 06:57 PM ·

Hi, Nate :) I hate to be boring, but he was a top-level violinist in any case (by the way, have you heard his Mendelsohn?), and Auer himself seemed to appreciate his gift even higher than Heifetz's. This is what Auer told in certain interview, already in the States: ""But one I shall always remember; one who in genius was as great as the greatest of those whose names I love to repeat."

"He was with me at the same time as were Seidel and Heifetz. He had, and has, great genius; and - I may confess it - he was my favorite among all my pupils. But he lacked a body strong enough to do his will. When it came to the test his nerves mastered him, when he should have been master of them. This was especially true when he played in public. And so he failed by the slightest margin. His fellow pupils are making great names for themselves; while he - I do not even know where he is."

 

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