do violinists really eat turkey on thanksgiving? :)

November 26, 2008 at 08:24 PM ·

is the tradition still going strong?  in the media there is talk about lobster as a replacement.    what do you really eat?!   giving the economy, beside breathing and kicking,  anything to thank for?

(my wife recently found out that i have, among other nutty things, been giving advice on v.com, so consider this my last thread on nonsense but crucially important  items:)

 

happy burping everyone!

Replies (28)

November 26, 2008 at 09:06 PM ·

Growing up, we usually had turkey.  My dad was more partial to ham or capon, so we also had that on occasion. 

Tomorrow's meal includes turkey, cornbread stuffing, sweet potatoes, Greek style green beans, rolls, Greek salad, cherry pie, and sparkling cider.  There are also backup foods in the house for my 5 & 6 yr old should they pull out the "I thought I would like it, but it tastes weird". 

 




November 26, 2008 at 09:15 PM ·

No, violinists ARE turkeys on Thanksgiving (and all other times).

 

November 26, 2008 at 09:42 PM ·

Is it bad to give advice on violinist.com?

Isn't it the perfect place for seriousness and at the same time, to celebrate the wonderful sens of humour that us violinists of all origins have (not to be pretentious.. but violinists are often people with a very big sense of humour.  I think it is a kind of secondairy effect to compensate for all this serious concentration that violin requires and/or music is also associate with festive events, even classical when it is not in a too formal concert. 

For eating turkey, many people still do it on Thanks giving in Canada but, for us, it is in October.

Anne-Marie

November 26, 2008 at 09:50 PM ·

Hi All:

You bet we do!

We spend a family day, cooking, feasting, and giving thanks for all we have!

We are Italian-American and just need the slightest excuse to cook and eat!

Traditions can be lovely!

Joseph

 

November 26, 2008 at 10:21 PM ·

Oh God here we go...

First of all, my grandma does everything over the top and that woman will be going 100 miles an hour til she's 90. I think a lot of her is in me so to speak.

But with that in mind... Turkey, mashed potatos, candied yams, stuffing/dressing, vegetable trays, salad, fruit salad, amazing home made rolls...The list is endless.... Pie: Cherry, chocolate, pumkin, meraunge or however you spell it! and pecan (everything home made)

But it's not about the food... It's about how much everyone talks:) luckily I have an excuse not to because I still have no voice!

November 26, 2008 at 11:44 PM ·

Al wrote:

 (my wife recently found out that i have, among other nutty things, been giving advice on v.com, 

 

Lol, Al. 

November 27, 2008 at 12:44 AM ·

This year's menu:

Salmon fillets, steamed with a dash of dill.

Asparagus spears, also steamed.

Brown Rice.

Brownies (Ghirardilli, from the mix in the box, but they are better than my brownies from scratch).

I grew up with the traditional turkey dinner, with many, many kinds of taters (insert smiley face here), and I like turkey, but I like fish more.  Fish has become so expensive, so to make up a nice batch feels like a real treat.  I can get cheapo-turkey any time.

Happy Thanksgiving!  Safe travels!

 

November 27, 2008 at 03:43 AM ·

I'll eat anything on Thanksgiving except for turkey, stuffing, yams, or cranberry sauce.  Basically the only thing I'm left with eating is pumpkin pie with lots of cool whip.

November 27, 2008 at 06:29 AM ·

We have roast chicken on Thanksgiving, roast turkey at Christmas, thus satisfying the respective preferences of our two sons.  The rest of the meal, to which we all contribute, and most of which is organic (another question for v.com'ers) and all from-scratch homemade:

Baked stuffed cheese potatoes, sweet potatoes, souped-up stuffing with our own gravy, cranberry-sour cherry sauce, egg bread wreath, pumpkin pie, and pear streusel pie (I made a bunch of them in response to a pear tree that produced several bushels this fall); accompanied by Wisconsin cranberry wine.  With variations we'll have the same at Christmas, only with turkey.

A bigger question:  how many v.com members are planning to PRACTICE VIOLIN on Thanksgiving day?!!!  Enjoy, everyone; good question, Al.

November 27, 2008 at 09:34 AM ·

Lobster? 

Lobster?!?

That's the first I've heard of that tradition.  We're planning on eating turkey until we die.  We've tried every year, but maybe this time we will succeed.

Happy Thanksgiving!

November 27, 2008 at 01:03 PM ·

hey emily,,,does alaska ship in turkeys or are they home grown i wonder?  or in your case,,,do you shoot your own? :)

i was also surprised to hear about lobster,,,apparently in maine, lobster industry was not doing too well, so some started a new movement:)

here is a link where some boston chefs talk about it,,,stealing thanksgiving with lobster:)
 

http://www.foodandwine.com/articles/a-revolutionary-thanksgiving

November 27, 2008 at 12:55 PM ·

Yes indeed !

Turkey, sweet potatoes,cornbread stuffing,green beans, baked bread ,deviled eggs and boston creme pie.

Oh I can feel the induced laziness already :)

In answer to Erics question, I'll be fiddlin' whilst the turkey bakes.

 

HAPPY THANKSGIVING ALL

November 27, 2008 at 02:35 PM ·

Eric,

UH YEAH!! Today is normal for me as my ENTIRE family besides me will be at my brother's stupid football tournamet stuff so I've got  nothin' to do until 1-ish. And I think later, my distant cousin will probably make me do something violin related as he plays that and piano... Oh, I learned how to play Clair de lune (for the most part) on the piano.. So I'm not that retarded haha.

Al,

Alaska isn't that "country":) I don't know. Maybe people in the south hunt for their Thanksgiving turkey.... I don't even know where you would find one here!!

November 27, 2008 at 03:22 PM ·

Alaska isn't that "country":) I don't know. Maybe people in the south hunt for their Thanksgiving turkey...

 

LOL, Id have to say Alaska is as country as you can get. And as for us in the south, sure, some folks hunt for wild turkey, but mines I butterball...yup, shot it at the kroger ,I did ;) yee haw

November 27, 2008 at 04:35 PM ·

Ha....

The most redneck thing I've ever seen was this show a few weeks ago where the parents took the kids to Costco or Sam's Club or something once a week for the kids dinner! They had them walk around the entire store eating samples and I was just like "wow..." But I guess that's not a "white trash" thing because I could see just cheap, really cheap people doing that with their kids.

November 27, 2008 at 04:55 PM ·

Al: My family on my mother's side comes from Boston and as you know, I live in Quebec...We changed the tradition:

 

The menu= "Canard à l'orange "

It takes a long time to prepare the duck , but a very short time, usually, to eat it!

 

Happy thanksgiving!!!!

November 28, 2008 at 06:41 PM ·

Every year a restaurant here prepares a take-out vegan feast that is so delicious that it's hands-down my favorite meal of the year.  We usually  buy enough to have leftovers to go with the remaining pie for a day or two after Thanksgiving.  This in itself is a lot to be thankful for.

I hope everyone at violinist.com is having a wonder holiday weekend.

November 28, 2008 at 07:58 PM ·

great article...no turkey this year, never got to the market and had no plans or visitors so played Bach, polished all the fiddles and bows, googled to get info on a possible "bow find"...

No turkey and sorry to say No wine

leftover stuffed shells & coffee but I'm doin' just fine

November 29, 2008 at 12:07 AM ·

To answer your question, al, we receive shipments of food just like everywhere else in the US.  I still live connected to the road system, though.  I'm sure people out in the bush have a variety of traditions.  Two years ago, I had swan instead of turkey.   It was the tastiest!

November 29, 2008 at 01:38 AM ·

Swan!

November 29, 2008 at 02:55 AM ·

The tastiest!

November 29, 2008 at 11:44 PM ·

What about that duck stuffed in the chicken stuffed into the turkey. I have always wanted to try that.

Seriously, my youngest daughter said to me... "I will not eat anything for Thanksgiving that looks like an animal"..... ok here's some spam for you lol

Paul... I have actually seen those people you are talking about at Sam's lol but sad

 

November 30, 2008 at 01:05 AM ·

How to cook a swan:

http://www.godecookery.com/mtrans/mtrans52.html

Should also probably have the countertenor solo from Carmina Burana playing in the background.

Only turkey here.  I do not think I could eat swan.   I have trouble with duck, too, but that's because I had some very feisty pet ducks when I was a kid. 

 

November 30, 2008 at 06:43 AM ·

violinists,in general,tend to not partake in the over consumption of food related items---------usually,they save their money to buy a new set of strings---at  least once every 6 months !

Yes,I'm ready for a new set---maybe Warchals-haven't tried them yet.........

Tomorrow,tomorrow and tomorrow creeps by often slow---unless other musicians are involved in your conspiracy to allow time to pass in a slower pace...oft,your attempt will signify nothing--but may be appreciated by a very few.

Strive to be happy in the attempt  !

November 30, 2008 at 10:41 AM ·

"how many v.com members are planning to PRACTICE VIOLIN on Thanksgiving day?!!!"

I not only practiced, I had a violin lesson :)   A really really good one in fact followed by a really good practice session.  Something to be thankful for!

When I am at home, we have all of the usual Thanksgiving dishes - Turkey with gravy, ham, mashed potatoes, corn, green beans, stuffing, cranberry sauce, pumpkin pie, etc. coupled with fresh fish caught by my cousins and lots of other yummy things.

This year was different as I celebrated in Germany with friends.  I brought all of my usual things (green bean casserole, deviled eggs, turkey, gravy, pumpkin pie etc.) and my friends brought food reflecting where they are from.  So we had yorkshire pudding from England (which turns out not to be a pudding at all!!), curry over bread from my japanese friend, Brotchen shaped like mushrooms, and the best, Backschinken (a very big piece of pork baked inside of bread).  yummy!

December 1, 2008 at 01:36 AM ·

oh,Elizabeth---sounds like tons of fun for me....do 'your people' enjoy it when you release your ax from its case and go on to do violin solos ?

December 1, 2008 at 01:42 AM ·

That eat lobster thing is a product of the turkey's PR firm.

December 1, 2008 at 08:28 AM ·

Joe, I'm not sure if your comment was serious or sarcastic, so I'll give an answer for either interpretation :)

This year no one had to listen to me practice because Thanksgiving isn't celebrated here and I did my celebrations on Friday instead of Thursday.  So I had the entire day to myself.  And I didn't play any violin solos for my friends because I've only been playing since February and am not quite ready to make so much of an embarrasment of myself.....

If I had been at home though, celebrating at my aunt's like usual, I'm sure she would have asked me to play violin and actually enjoyed it....every year she always asks me to play piano and I spend a good portion of the day running back and forth between the piano and joining in whatever activity my cousins are doing.

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