Question for Drew

April 8, 2008 at 04:40 AM · Hi Drew,

I'm wondering if you could explain the details about Repetition Hits. Exactly what is a repetition hit and how would you incorporate in a practice routine.

Also I'm wondering if any other folks had some experiences to share regarding this approach.

Thanks.

Roy

Replies (35)

April 9, 2008 at 02:15 AM · please;)

April 9, 2008 at 08:11 AM ·

You guys might be sorry you asked. If there is a rule on the length of a “discussion statement” I might have just shattered it:-) Sorry Laurie.

REP HITS:

RH

(Rep Hits)

Repetition Hits of the left-hand fingers thrown from the knuckles to gain a freer action with greater accuracy –

do not pound the fingers as in knocking loudly on a door.

1. The action is to be decisive and light.

a. For dramatic and/or intense passages we do apply greater strength, always maintaining freedom of action with flexibility.

2. Best done in rhythmic patterns.

a. For the longer rhythm, feel the finger hold the note like an electro magnet that you simply turn off when the note ends – the finger rhythmically and automatically releases the string.

b. The fingers must remain close to the string and above their note.

PURPOSE:

They are designed to rid the player of the plague of searching/seeking/fishing for the note and develop incredible accuracy of intonation and rhythm.

The rhythmic release of the fingers is constantly training the left hand to relax, remain neutral and ready to strike again. I use strong terms such as “hit” and “strike” because the left hand fingers must be decisive in all they do. Of course, there are many times one is far gentler in touch and the fingers are never to pound the fingerboard, sounding like cannons firing. As you both know with all of your experience, both playing and teaching, there are times we play pp with the bow and mp with the left hand — even Dramatico!

HOW:

They should initially be done without vibrato — proving the accuracy and stability of the quick, short hit and the ability to maintain the pitch/tone on the longer note. There is substantial release to a strong hit, as the finger does not need to continually squeeze the string thereby seizing the left hand, wrist and arm, etc.

In double stops, one finger should initially be kept as the “plumb line” while the other matches/harmonizes. You will see and hear that the held note’s pitch and finger balance to the string and fingerboard is maintained far easier while hitting/throwing/dropping rather than when one slides and twists the other finger into place — this can also cause the finger/hand/arm to go off balance, immediately adding unwanted tension to the action.

Following, the held/plumb line finger should then alternate the RH action and eventually both should be done together.

With the above use a very decisive bow stroke to match the left-hand finger precision. I have found the best rhythm to start with is 2-8ths and 1-quarter — keep the 8ths short and sustain the quarter into the next finger’s hit. With this and various other bow rhythms and alternating style, say from Marcato to Détaché, the player is attaining an incredible level of coordination between the left hand fingers and bow arm.

WHEN:

ALWAYS AND EVERYWHERE.

In doing the Open & Closed Hand Groups, 3rds, 4ths, 8va Study (shaping and proportioning the hand via the extra notes), 5ths, 6ths, 7ths, 9ths and even 10ths for accuracy of finger placement, posture/shape of the hand and balance on the strings and fingerboard.

Rep Hits are of paramount importance in developing great intonation and ease of action in Arpeggios and Scales.

Basics II through V have a Rep Hit written into the study, ala Sevcik, but when a finger arrives incorrectly — whether intonation (obvious) or balance/posture (easily missed) — that note should be accurately hit with the above rhythm (2-8ths and 1-quarter) in at least 3 sets. That is 9 placements/playings of the note — if any one, even the last is wrong, one starts over and if that is not accurate, the number goes up to 5 sets of 3 hits. It’s brutal, but somebody has to do it:-) Besides, my students and I make a game of it and have fun — you only live once…

All of this is directly applied into the repertoire. Practice 3rds passages like the 3rds study — employing rep hits for freedom of action with accuracy and balance along with the shift preparations where we anticipate the new finger interval when there is a change during the shift.

Practice Scales and Arpeggios from the repertoire in the same fashion. If it is particularly difficult move it up or down by half steps. Open strings can get in the way a bit, but improvise or stop that section at the open string if necessary.

Vary bowings and rhythms, etc., etc.

It is all about freedom of motion, agility, accuracy and balance.

Freedom of Motion:

The throw of the finger is from the knuckle, as is the measure of the interval — this latter point being determined by the:

1. Expansion/contraction of the left hand knuckles and palm,

2. The rotation of the left arm and hand independent of the upper arm, and

3. The pendulum-like movement of the upper arm bringing the thumb/fingers/hand/wrist and forearm all into proper balance for the given passage, e.g., playing 4th– finger A on the D–string and 1st–finger B on the A–string is amazingly different in angles and balance (approach) from playing 1st–finger E on the D–string and 4th– finger E on the A–string.

Agility:

With the Freedom of Motion above, one gains an agility I liken unto a great dancer (4 legged, I will save the Thumb for later:-) When the whole apparatus of the left fingers all the way through the arm into the shoulder and torso (and neck/head) are free to move at any time, in any direction and at any speed, the player will have total agility and ease of motion.

Accuracy:

Of intonation, to be sure, and every move executed in getting around the violin. (I think we sometimes concentrate too much on our “little hollow wooden box” and fail to fully concentrate on the strings and fingerboard. All the maneuvers of the left hand are to flow and fly on them and then pull/draw out the desired tone, via the bow, from that little box with the strings.

Balance:

These all fit hand in glove. Without one you cannot fully achieve the others. The left hand must be completely balanced for all the various combinations of intervals/fingers across and along the strings.

Thumb:

Along with everything I have mentioned above, the thumb plays a crucial roll in every part of this. It adjusts for every rotation, positon, intervallic pattern, et al. It is highly pro active, BUT IT NEVER GRIPS!!! It is a support, guide and locator.

Left Hand/Arm

See Posture.

2. Thumb should initially be across from the knuckle of the 1st finger, behind the tip — this will modify based on string, position and intervals or type of passage being played. See Posture, 3a.

a. Develop independence of motion — never grip or squeeze the neck.

Hope that answers your question and perhaps a few others’ queries.

Cheers,

Drew

Everything affects everything.

(Excerpts are from my books Violin Technique: The Manual, How to master… and Viola Technique: The Manual, How to master…)

April 9, 2008 at 12:30 PM · Aha! I think I'm finally catching on. But I want to be sure:

On Pg. 7 Second line from the bottom, first measure, do we raise and lower the first finger three times, then the second finger 3x, etc. etc?

Once that basic matter is cleared up, I can respond to the rest of the details.

Thanks, Drew for your verbal generosity. I love it!!

Roy

April 9, 2008 at 03:26 PM · Yes, but do not lift — just let go rhythmically.

See, I can be brief:-)

April 10, 2008 at 01:53 AM · Should the finger arrive on the string exactly when the bow stroke begins or before the bow begins.

I am assuming that:

1. the bow stroke is extremely staccato to coordinate with the finger stroke.

2. We do not want to hear any open string sounds between the notes.

April 10, 2008 at 04:14 AM · Greetings,

many thanks Drew.

Please bear in mind the Confucian wisdom that states `he who peristantly writes in brief runs the risk of catching a cold via the nether regions.`

Cheers,

Buri

April 10, 2008 at 05:22 AM · Drew, please move to LA as soon as possible.

Do you accept modest bribes?

April 10, 2008 at 07:09 AM ·

Roy,

With a younger or less advanced player that is having a bit of difficulty coordinating the finger and bow, I would have the finger lead the way, but in all honesty I cannot remember this being a particular problem as the coordination of the finger and bow come most naturally with this technique (Repetition Hits). For the little ones, and me, the left hand finger is the trigger and the bow shoots the arrow out (up or down).

The one big exception to this involves the string crossing.

1. I have the student stop/freeze (that is easy in Chicago this time of year:-).

2. Prepare the left arm, hand and finger for the new string.

3. Prepare the bow arm for the new string. (A great deal of this is already developing from the PLANES/STRING CROSSINGS on page 4, studies 1-6, along with the Open & Closed Hand Groups beginning on page 6.)

4. ALL must be set and ready to go — “get set, ready…, GO!

“the bow stroke is extremely staccato to coordinate with the finger stroke.”

Yes, use 2 short separated staccato strokes with the 3rd bow begun with the same accent and then well sustained. If the player has the coordination down, there is no need to stop after the long note — simply connect into the next short staccato.

”We do not want to hear any open string sounds between the notes.”

Yes, no other notes or strings, although that can certainly be at the player’s/teacher’s discretion. The reason for this is to fully concentrate on the given pitch.

When playing the 2nd, 3rd and 4th fingers, the fingers below should be down and accurately measured to be in tune. An exception to this would be in higher positions where especially the half step cannot be “down and in tune” — but it usually can be lightly touching the string ready to move into play or simply adding an extremely light stabilizing of the hand.

If not a double stop, where one note/finger is being checked against another held note, one can also use the neighboring string above or below — use perfect intervals (particularly 4ths, 8vas and Unisons when possible). If a 3rd is desired, the 4th will always help tune the 3rd perfectly.

Buri,

I thought the prunes prevented the brief runs — now I may not sleep tonight and a draft is rising from the floor! Never have the legions faced such confusion in the regions!!

April 10, 2008 at 05:37 AM · Anthony,

Of course I do, I live in Chicago and the calendar says Spring, but my blood says winter!

How about a house near the ocean…

April 10, 2008 at 02:16 PM · I had never tried RH until I got Drew's book .... it is a REALLY interesting approach (I wonder if he invented it? I read a lot and have never come across it before...) and I have noticed a big improvement in a number of my pupils(mostly kids). since experimenting. In fact, as a result, I am in the process of writing some kid's very elementary pieces with cd and piano accomp. which are actually to be played with RH (the story line is going to be about 'gaters and stuff ... you know, your fingers become the teeth, below the finger board is the 'gater's stomache, so when you RH with your third finger no collapsing of the hand allowed because then there's nowhere for the 'gaters's nosh to go ... something along those lines anyway ... )Drew I will send you a copy for your approval (or not, as the case may be)or revision when I have finished!

Drew ... what do you think about RH with pizz? I had a little boy you could NOT do it , (ie co-ordinate) with the bow ... after a few rounds of RH PIzz ... he could then do it with the bow)

April 10, 2008 at 02:30 PM · As always, thank you for your generous advice.

I'm going to have to schedule a lesson with you early Summer when my genealogicaly involved wife goes gravestone hunting in your area and get some of this information right from the source.

April 10, 2008 at 04:21 PM · Teresa,

Glad it is helping and I would love to see your book and comment on it — love the gators:-) I have taken on a bright little 7 year-old boy — an absolute beginner with 1 year of piano. Being quirky as I am, I have him beginning in the 4th position. I have been thinking over a book as well…

Lesson #1: (1 Hour)

1. Violin parts;

2. strings;

3. say musical alphabet (up & down, really fast!);

4. violin position/posture (point violin toward mirror and lift until you cannot see the fingerboard — approx parallel to floor);

5. left hand pizz (pg 93) with the E-string only in 4th position only using 4, 3 & 2 — NO 1st finger;

6. Bow Hold (very small, so I use Russian/Auer though he sometimes switches to Franco-Belgium which I identify and then he goes back to Russian:-);

7. Planes/String Crossings 1a-c;

8. and Crescent Bow with flat hair.

Lesson #2:

1. Review Lesson 1 and

2. add Rhythm pattern in Pizz (pg93, #1) using E & G strings;

3. Add Rhythmic patterns to open A-string bow strokes;

4. Shifting with fingers curved and hovering in the air above strings (slide toward scroll and back — no notes and no bow)

5. Planes reviewed

6. BGH with light shapes — use feather-light Repetition Hits, then wiggle fingers freely around and reshape. Thumb should be moved around with fingers and independently while fingers are still.

Lesson #3:

1. Review Lessons 1 & 2.

2. Add piece I wrote for him in 4th position — “First in 4th”

Lesson #4:

1. Review above and added variation;

2. Learning terms — Andante, Cantabile, Détaché, Portato.

3. Count while playing — no metronome (and I use the metronome a lot with my other pupils, to their great glee and joy:-)

Lesson #5: Monday, April 14th…

Yes, the Rep Hits work with pizzicato and/or by themselves. Just have the student hit the note, hold the finger and listen carefully — they will hear the pitch and they think it is so cool!:-)

Ray,

You and you wife can dig me up anytime —I will rise to the occasion

April 10, 2008 at 07:37 PM · Drew,

I'm finally getting the idea. Amazing that it's taken me so long. And I can see, just trying it out myself how valuable it can be. Can't wait to try it with some students.

I would love to see a short video of you demonstrating the technique and how you might teach it.

April 11, 2008 at 04:33 AM · Thanks Roy, and thanks for the initial question.

I have thought about doing a video demo of the various aspects of the book and am still……thinking……

I hope my responses assisted you and others. Please fell free to ask again, should some question pop up.

All the best,

Drew

April 11, 2008 at 05:28 AM · <>

Drew, which part of "meager bribe" did you not comprehend? ;)

April 11, 2008 at 06:35 AM · 'ey Tony,

I'ma from Tcheecago, no?

April 11, 2008 at 09:05 AM · Nice to see someone`s read my book on correct spelling...

April 11, 2008 at 01:20 PM · I keep triing to mpruuv…

April 11, 2008 at 01:24 PM · drew, if you come out with a video equivalent, my family will camp outside your door to get the first copy. easy on the dogs, though!

April 11, 2008 at 02:45 PM · Video! Brilliant!

April 11, 2008 at 04:03 PM · I 'm not sure if you mention it Drew, but one more thing occurs to me regarding the role of the thumb and intonation in moving from one position to another. Because the thickness of the neck increases as you go up in position, the non-grabbing, flexible thumb together with the first finger on the other side of the neck helps accurately gauge where you are along the neck of the violin to determine the placement of each position and therefore aids intonational accuracy as well.

April 11, 2008 at 06:37 PM · Gosh I'm feeling dense. I've read every word of this thread, and I still don't really understand what a repetion hit is and how to do it.

April 11, 2008 at 11:48 PM · I think I understand the left-hand part of it, at least the concept, but I don't understand how to coordinate with the bow if I am just repeating the same note. This sounds like a really stupid question...do I stop the bow between hits, while the finger is lifted? Should the finger be dropped before starting the bow stroke, or simultaneously? How fast should the 8th notes be for this to work?

April 12, 2008 at 05:48 AM · Thanks for the questions — will answer over the weekend as I am swamped with teaching.

Drew

April 13, 2008 at 05:28 PM · Al — The dogs love a challenge and … don’t eat too many prunes before coming as it upsets their sesitve constitution

ALL —

The video idea has been bouncing around in my head from the start and originally I thought I would do it with the books from the start. The project became so involved that I just had to get it off my back for a while.

If I did a video regarding the book, what do you think would be the best format? As a download (would that be high enough resolution?), or as a separate purchase DVD for those who would like that option?

Say it would be 60 – 90 minutes. What price would be good? I am serious in this question, as I feel there seem to be wild extremes of ridiculously high prices or free:-( Then gain, it would probably encourage the sale of more books.

I would want it to be a great value to the purchaser/user.

ANY THOUGHTS FROM ANYONE?

Ron —

“…the non-grabbing, flexible thumb together with the first finger on the other side of the neck helps accurately gauge where you are along the neck of the violin to determine the placement of each position and therefore aids intonational accuracy as well.”

Absolutely! I have never been a proponent of the side of the left hand’s 1st finger being held away from the neck. I know it is often taught as necessary for freedom of motion and vibrato — this is total error.

When there is a gap on the E-string side of the neck, in the lower 3 to 4 positions (depending on hand size and string being played), there is a tremendous increase of tension from the tips through the thumb, hand, wrist, etc., all the way into the shoulder, back and neck of the player.

WHY IS THIS TAUGHT SO COMMONLY!? The various parts of the arm and hand always work in concert together.

Some say it frees the hand — I say nonsense! As you see I have no opinion on this matter:-)))

Simply hold the instrument lightly. Stand or sit tall with great ease and alertness, physically and mentally. Without the bow, hold the instrument properly with stings parallel to the floor and gently raise and lower the scroll a few inches. The instrument should feel virtually weightless.

Now slide/shift the hand back and forth along the neck, initially floating the fingers above the strings with fingers relaxed and arched a few millimeters in the air. Achieve this without gripping/squeezing/clamping the neck — it can help to point the instrument directly at a mirror and lift so that you cannot see the fingerboard. Later, let the fingers feather-touch the strings as you do this slide/shift.

When going into the higher positions, the flow must continue seamlessly. Anticipate the lifting over the top of the instrument by moving the thumb diagonally back under the neck as you proceed.

NEVER kick the wrist out “to get around the shoulder” of the instrument. This is similar to an artists drawing of a cartoon character getting ready to run forward by first moving backwards and then shooting ahead. Great in action cartoons, but never done at the Olympics…

With the thumb under the neck it is easy to pivot up and over the top to the higher positions. Maintain the “face” (fingernail) of the finger as you slide up the string. Again, initially do this very lightly with feather-touch.

In all of the above, when adding various degrees of strength to the fingers, the core finger stability will be increased of necessity — BUT NEVER SQUEEZE THE THUMB!!!

Note that when the thumb is diagonally back to any degree, it enables much more freedom in the left hand for all actions — especially vibrato. Mind you, the thumb must have the skill and agility to be moved independently as passages require different movements for the hand and fingers.

Everything affects everything.

Christian —

“…I still don't really understand what a repetion hit is and how to do it.”

I don’t either! :-) Just kidding…

It is so simple that it is easily missed. Teresa wondered if I invented it. I never thought of it that way as I have just done it as long as I can remember — probably since riding my brontosaurus to school…

It is simply playing a given note/finger several times in a row. If the finger lands out of tune, or even off balance (especially in double-stops and chords), simply release the finger — it will pop up off the string (float).

Then re-measure the interval, checking angles of finger, hand, wrist and arm — balance/posture. (Also, note your general balance and posture in holding the instrument, as this affects everything.)

Throw the finger down from the knuckle (this is where we measure from) and modify until consistently accurate, easy and free. I do this with 2 8ths and 1 quarter (short, short, long____).

Use a short staccato bow on the 8ths with the finger releasing and re-thrown for each stroke — no notes in between (though this can be added at the player/teacher discretion).

With the long note, I use the same attack for the bow but sustain it fully if going on to another note — for instance, I will always use this method with my students as they do there scales and arpeggios. It is tremendously efficient. Play a scale or arpeggio with Rep Hits, even just the 3 hits on each note, and it is far better then playing the same 10 times through — this is no exaggeration.

When shifting in the scale or arpeggio, etc., I repeat the shifts sliding (lightly) audibly back and forth. Written examples of this, along with many other methods, are in my books. Similar rhythmic patterns should also be added to the sliding shifts. In the top positions it is good to do a slurred legato version, alternating notes/fingers.

The note/finger can be paired with open stings and/or double-stops.

Elena —

“...do I stop the bow between hits, while the finger is lifted?”

Yes, but do not lift the finger — simply release it rhythmically (precisely). This is extremely important as it trains the fingers to be relaxed in-between use. Kind of an on/off switch — saves enormous energy and gets rid of tension.

“Should the finger be dropped before starting the bow stroke, or simultaneously?”

Before, as the bow moves with the hit of the note. At first the bow can be delayed further, if that helps.

“How fast should the 8th notes be for this to work?”

Moderate tempo. Do not hurry as we are training the accuracy and action.

The hand will develop incredible speed, reliability and ease of action in all of this training.

Hope this helps —

Drew

Author of

Violin Technique: The Manual, How to master…

Viola Technique: The Manual, How to master…

April 13, 2008 at 11:41 PM · Greetings,

>Absolutely! I have never been a proponent of the side of the left hand’s 1st finger being held away from the neck. I know it is often taught as necessary for freedom of motion and vibrato — this is total error.When there is a gap on the E-string side of the neck, in the lower 3 to 4 positions (depending on hand size and string being played), there is a tremendous increase of tension from the tips through the thumb, hand, wrist, etc., all the way into the shoulder, back and neck of the player. WHY IS THIS TAUGHT SO COMMONLY!? The various parts of the arm and hand always work in concert together.

Some say it frees the hand — I say nonsense! As you see I have no opinion on this matter:-)))

May prunes rain down on you and your family for generations to come. This issue drives me nuts. One hears so often from people, who have never actually investigate d what really happens, that touching the side of the neck causes tension when it actually does the reverse. `free up your vibrato by releasing the finger/hand` is the oft heard expression, but as far as I am cocnercerned if there is any tension present during this touching then it is a technical defect that needs to be addressed. I think a lot of problems with vibrato are actually created because a student is trained to have the weight of the relatively huge hand swinging backwards and forwards on one poor little finger tip touching a microspic space on the finger board. Its like a drunk trying to balance on one foot after being caught speeding. I also find the use of multiple finger vibrato more relaxing , stable and expressive if the mechanism as a whole is relaxed. I think the ideal models in regard to this are player ssuch as Milstein and Heifetz who were -really- touchy feely compared to a lot of what one sees today.

I find myself asking if it more fun to prod ones loved one with an impersonal fingertip or enjoy a warm caress using all the senses at ones disposal....

I don`t have an opinion on this subject either.

Cheers,

Buri

April 14, 2008 at 01:04 AM · Buri,

Maybe WE should start a school — do you think the commute between Japan and Chicago can be done daily? (Especially if we eat extra portions of prunes…)

April 14, 2008 at 02:12 AM · Drew said:

"If I did a video regarding the book, what do you think would be the best format? As a download (would that be high enough resolution?), or as a separate purchase DVD for those who would like that option?

Say it would be 60 – 90 minutes. What price would be good? I am serious in this question, as I feel there seem to be wild extremes of ridiculously high prices or free:-( Then gain, it would probably encourage the sale of more books.

I would want it to be a great value to the purchaser/user."

Drew, You are asking all the right questions, and the important ones. They are in fact the same questions that I am grappling with myself as I prepare to launch my own line of instructional videos for violin students.

Once you have the video ready, you can easily offer it in multiple formats, including, selling it with the book, selling it as a separate purchase DVD, offering it online as a download, offering parts of it free online, etc.

I feel that a 60-90 minute DVD would be immensely valuable to the users of your book and also to many people who will not even buy the book. I think that your book itself is of great value and contains much that I have not seen before in print. I think that value could be magnified enormously by a video -- or better still, by several videos.

Pricing is a tough call. Most instructional videos that I have seen fall within the price range of $20 - $40. And then with the download option, the possibilities are much more varied.

We are indeed seeing some wild extremes of pricing. On the one hand there is Todd Ehle who now has 50+ short videos available for free on Youtube. At the other extreme is Clayton Haslop charging absurdly high prices for his videos. I suppose he is making money -- if that is the ultimate goal. Who knows. My personal feeling, and I think yours too, is that the ultimate goal of the true teacher is to help as many people as much as possible.

April 14, 2008 at 03:33 AM · Roy,

"…My personal feeling, and I think yours too, is that the ultimate goal of the true teacher is to help as many people as much as possible."

Yes, I totally agree and thank you for your input on this — especially the multiple applications for a DVD. Do let me know further when yours is ready, as you have great ideas and presentation with real substance.

All the best,

Drew

April 14, 2008 at 10:58 AM · I am swamped for time so haven't really read the messages in this thread .... but just wanted to say .... Drew, I think I would go for a DVD that comes with the book! ...and I also encourage you to MAKE

that DVD!

April 14, 2008 at 01:25 PM · i think the challenge is in the presentation of the content, that is, how to successfully transpose a good script onto the screen. it may take a lot more creativity than one is comfortable with if the objective is to reach a wider, targeted, audience. it may be helpful to consult with some professionals in that industry or do some test screens to get feedback to establish an intended style.

at the end of the day, it is not as much as how it is presented as how it is received. from script to screen, the bar is set much higher (but always open for drinks).

good luck gents because great videos will find their pricing, formats and audience.

April 21, 2008 at 01:10 PM · I've recently gotten Drew's book Violin Technique: The Manual, and I think it's brilliant. I'm using it in collaboration with Mr Haslop's DVDs/course material. I've printed out this thread and have put it inside my copy of Drew's book.

I thought it worthwhile though to counter the opinion, above, that the Violin Mastery DVDs etc are absurdly overpriced. I believe in the view that 'the worker deserves his wage', and that 'he who cooks the pie is entitled to eat of it'. Violin lessons, after all, are themselves by no means lowly priced, or free. Who would begrudge any teacher his or her fee for a lesson? Typical violin lessons in Australia are about USD$70 for an hour with an expert violinist and teacher. More in some cases.

Philanthropy and free or cheap video is a good thing, but most average people/artists need to eat. It costs money to live. I only point this out lest we slip into hypocrisy.

April 23, 2008 at 04:16 PM · Jon,

Thank you for your generous comment and I am flattered that you would use my book in conjunction with Clayton Haslop's DVDs. I follow his writings and find his tips and observations most cogent and at times inspirational.

My book is designed to be used in bits along with other studies and/or in totality. Simply reference the given technical issue and study the method given to master the type of passage, i.e., scales, arpeggios, 3rds, etc.

You are correct in stating that the DVDs are not "absurdly overpriced" as they are very specific lessons one can review them hundreds of times, if wanted. That really is a bargain in that light.

Eating is a good thing:-)

Thanks for balancing the previous comments.

Let me know if you have any questions.

Drew

December 10, 2008 at 03:24 AM ·

Drew...any updates on the development of a dvd?   Your public awaits!

December 14, 2008 at 06:38 AM ·

Hi Tess,

You are very kind to ask.

I am presently working on a fast-paced beginner book and am coming around to the idea of a DVD with this new book and the Violin and Viola Technique books.

People who have my books and v.commers will be the first to know. 

Thanks for asking.

Drew

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