Scales==Flesch or Galamian??

February 11, 2008 at 06:20 AM · The dog quite literally ate my Flesch Scale System. Should I replace it or buy the Galamian?

Replies (21)

February 11, 2008 at 02:04 PM · Try Nadaud, Gammes Pratiques. You can get it from sheetmusicplus.com.

February 11, 2008 at 02:29 PM · Jay,

You really should know both. Flesch was my first scale book then I practiced Galamian scale book later in high school. Recently I've been practicing a scale study book authored by an aunt of Yoko Ono (wife of John Lennon). Yoko Ono's aunt (Anna Ono)was a celebrated violin teacher and her scale studies are still in print and used here in Japan.

Craig

February 11, 2008 at 02:21 PM · I have both, but I was only taught Flesch. And even then, my high school teacher and both of my university teachers had their own fingerings and rhythm/bowing exercises that they preferred--so we really just used Flesch as a reference for the keys and order of notes.

February 11, 2008 at 02:44 PM · How's the dog doing? A revenge on high notes, I bet. Our dog mainly howls. I guess he isn't smart enough to figure out Flesch is the culprit. My daughter's teacher uses both, simultaneously.

February 11, 2008 at 03:48 PM · Thanks, everyone! Now I'll have to buy both! I was afraid of that.

Jay

February 11, 2008 at 09:46 PM · I guess Flesch

February 11, 2008 at 10:57 PM · Greetings,

why don`t you buy Drew `s book instead. It`s got the sclaes , =how to do them- and a lot more.

Cheers,

Buri

February 12, 2008 at 12:25 AM · Buri--

What is the name of Drew's book and what is his full name?

February 12, 2008 at 12:29 AM · Greetings,

Drew Lecher. The dude who writes the interesitng blogs called GPS. His website is the paklce to order the only book he has written so far.

Cheers,

Buri

Has your dog grown scales yet?

March 2, 2008 at 05:06 AM · I have both, but honestly, I don't use books when I practice scales.

Learn the circle of 5ths and memorize good fingerings.

Arpeggios I find, are actually somewhat more beneficial...

Don't forget to learn your fingerboard horizontally too....

Start by playing arpeggios in double stops, then broken, then add the scale.

To really get anywhere though, a very healthy dose of thirds and octaves ( also in arpegggios ) is a must.

I find an hour of thirds, 6ths, octaves and some extensions gets me warmed up properly to do my job. If I have more time, I spend an hour or so on the Caprices and some Bach....

March 2, 2008 at 05:20 AM · Heifetz had his students do the Hrimaly Scale Studies which is in my opinion the most fun scale program. I'd also suggest doing two octave scales in thirds, sixths, octaves (1-4 and fingered), and tenths in all keys. If anyone is interested in the Hrimaly PM me, and I'll send it to you. I did the Flesch book in high school but found it to be a little overly complicated.

March 3, 2008 at 06:22 AM · You just said Hrimaly was fun. Incredible.

March 3, 2008 at 06:42 AM · Greetings,

yes. That`s why Heifetz` lessons were so much fun;)

Cheers,

Buri

February 6, 2013 at 08:15 AM · If the dog ate the Flesch they obviously tasted great. How did it manage the 6 flats?

Seriously.

Joseph put his pupils through Sevcik first before going to Flesch, on which he hand wrote lots of alternative & very interesting fingering variants,- then little remarks after playing them on notes which tended for physical reasons to be thrown slightly sharp or flat.

It was also his method of ear training and sorting out intonation.

Pupils that first arrived at Flesch were most astonished to see how fast & easily he could play fingered octaves.

They are a MUST, and Flesch had many more useful devices for those who don't have a lot of time.

(Urstudien).

February 6, 2013 at 11:31 AM · fingered oktaves and decime scales. Everybody is afraid of them, but they actually teach you a lot and are a very good training for the left hand and both ears!

February 6, 2013 at 04:24 PM · Perhaps it is not a question which one is better, but which one is more accessible and useful.

The main difference between the "DIY" scales, such as Galamian and Nadaud versus the SYSTEM of scales, such as Flesh and Gilels is the approach to the end product.

The former are "samples", examples, bits and pieces spread across the book, so one has to flip pages all the time before memorizing the particular scale. The initial learning process is difficult, but perhaps once one memorizes and internalizes the "system" it gets better and more useful.

The later have everything bundled together; for each and every scale: scales on one string, all strings, arpeggios, double stops, chromatic scales and harmonics. So the initial learning process is easier.

Flesh himself started in the DIY manner, only to discover to his big disappointment that the majority of the violinists simply did not follow his instructions and practiced only C major scale all over again! Then he wrote his system of scales; full printed edition with all 24 scales and different bow strokes.

There are perhaps many benefits of Galamian's scales (scales on one string are great), but unless some does the editing and bundles all together, they will keep to collect the dust on mu shelf.

The dog knew what was good!

February 6, 2013 at 07:05 PM · The most accessible and useful is ... neither Flesch nor Galamian but rather Fischer.

February 8, 2013 at 10:43 AM · It is interesting - and benefitial - to compare the Kreutzer Etudes as edited by both Flesch and Galamian.

February 8, 2013 at 01:57 PM · Adrian, that is a very interesting idea!

February 11, 2013 at 11:04 PM · I tried John's link:

http://myers-lemoine.com/resources/FinalDocElectronic050211.pdf

In a word, Flesch avoided changeing strings on a semitone, extensions, string crossings, and open strings (especially the E);

Galamaian favoured extansions and "crab" fingerings, "bariolage" and open strings.

Maybe Flesch had smaller hands, and also a more lyrical approach.

So, in my case, Flesch for the viola, Galamian for the violin?

February 11, 2013 at 11:04 PM · I tried John's link:

http://myers-lemoine.com/resources/FinalDocElectronic050211.pdf

In a word, Flesch avoided changeing strings on a semitone, extensions, string crossings, and open strings (especially the E);

Galamaian favoured extansions and "crab" fingerings, "bariolage" and open strings.

Maybe Flesch had smaller hands, and also a more lyrical approach.

So, in my case, Flesch for the viola, Galamian for the violin?

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