Can you recognize without doubt the violinist?

October 2, 2007 at 09:51 PM · I have just written that I can recognize just from listening to their music for sure the following violinists : Perlman, Francescatti and Ricci.

can you do better?

Laurie we can arrange a game about the identification of violinists just by listening to some audio track.

what do you think about?

ciao

Replies (28)

October 2, 2007 at 10:34 PM · Greetings,

it`s a good idea. It`s been done though, about a year ago. Maybe it`s time to do it again.

Cheers,

Buri

October 2, 2007 at 10:38 PM · I can pretty reliably recognise David Oistrakh and to some extent Szeryng. Beyond that they are kind of a blur for me.

October 3, 2007 at 01:17 AM · Better yet... can you tell if the person playing the violin is male or female.

My daughter and I always are in a challenge whenever we listen to "performance today". She can always tell if the performer is male or female. She says there is a different sound. She has been right 3 times in a row.

October 3, 2007 at 01:23 AM · I can tell Szigeti, Vengerov, Perlman and to some extent Heifetz pretty quickly. I can also tell the Takacs Quartet almost instantaneously, partly because their second violinist has such a sound that I could pick him out blindfolded from a crowd of a hundred violinists.

October 3, 2007 at 01:47 AM · Heifetz is the easiest for me, followed by Oistrakh, Francescatti, Milstein and Stern.

October 3, 2007 at 02:18 AM · Greetings,

I would have thought it easy to recognize Kremer`s sound....

I think many contemporary players have a unique sound (albeit not like the days of Elman vs Heifetz) taht a focuse dperiod of listenign would render recognizable. I have no trouble with Vengerov and Hahn.

Cheers,

Buri

October 3, 2007 at 03:30 AM · anne-Sophie Mutter and Midori are the only violinist I recognize of the bat and sometimes Sarah Chang, especially more recently since her sound is becoming way more individualized.

October 3, 2007 at 03:57 AM · I can pick Perlman out. I'm pretty sure it's his vibrato.

October 3, 2007 at 04:40 AM · Honestly, I don't see why it's any different than recognizing your favorite singer.

If you listen to a fiddle player long enough, identifying the sound, vibrato, phrasing characteristics, etc., really should be easy enough.

October 3, 2007 at 05:29 AM · I can't even recognize myself playing, when I start getting things right! ;)

October 3, 2007 at 05:57 AM · My sound keeps changing lately. It's really disconcerting. :(

October 3, 2007 at 06:15 AM · Kreisler is one of the easiest to recognise I think

October 3, 2007 at 02:19 PM · My sound keeps changing lately. It's really disconcerting. :(

Sometimes freshmen in conservatory have a frustrating period if their new teacher changes a lot of their playing, which is quite common. Is that it, or is this a mystery (and thus disconcerting)?

October 3, 2007 at 03:39 PM · I am with William on this one.

Almost every violinist that I have really listened too, and that ain't a few, can I recognize fairly easy.

But some takes a few bars before they pops out.

October 3, 2007 at 04:17 PM · Can someone post some links so we can do a blind test please!

October 3, 2007 at 07:00 PM · I'm fairly decent at picking out the older generation, but not the current one.

October 3, 2007 at 07:49 PM · "I'm fairly decent at picking out the older generation, but not the current one."

Are you more passionate about the older generation or the new? Which do you listen to more?

October 3, 2007 at 08:23 PM · That's interesting. I find the new generation harder to pick out since they (imo) don't have the same personal touches that the old guys did. Heifetz's vibrato and tone coloring, Oistrakh's winesome nostalgia, Francescatti's famous non-stop vibrato, Kriesler's sensuousness and Stern's brashness are much easier for me to spot than Vengerov or Hahn. I can figure out Bell (whispy tone), Shaham (super creamy sound), Mutter (wide vibrato)and Sarah Chang (ends of notes...not my fav.)

October 3, 2007 at 08:25 PM · Kevin, I find Mutter's vibrato not wide but very noticeable and recognizable. It doesn't seem to me to be wide but does seem quite fast. Heifetz-style, in a way. For that, though, (i.e., to speed up vibrato) I've always needed to NARROW the vib amplitude.

October 3, 2007 at 09:15 PM · Emil-

Wide was a bad adjective...l like noticeable better...

October 3, 2007 at 09:31 PM · Pretty much the only violinists I can always identify are Midori and Hahn . . . although I can usually recognize Perlman, and sometimes Oistrakh.

October 3, 2007 at 09:46 PM · I am interesteed in this topic as someone in the early stages of learning violin making, acustics and the interrelationship of the instrument and the player. A very interesting and provocative web site is that of Keith Hill, a musical instrument maker in Michigan and founder of the Institute for mucical perception.

http://www.musicalratio.com/

-Peter Lynch

October 4, 2007 at 04:39 PM · I'll prepare a quiz...give me a little bit, though. Have nothing better to do today, and it will be interested to see what people say.

October 4, 2007 at 07:17 PM · I was wondering how we did the quiz last time... I have various excerpts of various performances made into mp3s, but where would I post them? I don't remember how we went about this when we did the quiz last, however many months or years ago that was.

October 4, 2007 at 07:40 PM · I think that whoever did it last time just posted the links to each file in a post. Must have been a year ago.

October 4, 2007 at 08:18 PM · Here's the link to the original game:

http://www.violinist.com/discussion/response.cfm?ID=8386

October 4, 2007 at 09:31 PM · ^someone create a new game!

October 9, 2007 at 06:04 PM · >I find the new generation harder to pick out since they (imo) don't have the same personal touches that the old guys did. Heifetz's vibrato and tone coloring, Oistrakh's winesome nostalgia, Francescatti's famous non-stop vibrato, Kriesler's sensuousness and Stern's brashness are much easier for me to spot than Vengerov or Hahn. I can figure out Bell (whispy tone), Shaham (super creamy sound), Mutter (wide vibrato)and Sarah Chang (ends of notes...not my fav.)

Kevin, I just LOVE these descrips. Bravo for you on their concise eloquence. And you've put a finger on why I like Gil Shaham's sound so much. Creamy sound - oooh, that's it!

Thanks! : )

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