Who's the most widely know soloist in the world?

February 6, 2007 at 05:28 AM · Who do you think is the most commercially and internationally successful violinist performing today?

Nigel Kennedy

Vanessa Mae

Maxim vengerov

Anne Sophie Mutter

or Joshua Bell

Replies (99)

February 6, 2007 at 06:30 AM · Oistrakh! Well known in China for a long time and there are a lot of people there:)

February 6, 2007 at 06:40 AM · Oistrakh? today?

Do you mean Igor or David (who passed away in 1974).

He has always been one of my favorites.

But the question was who is commercially and internationally successful violinist performing today?

I think Josh Bell has to be one of the most commercially succesful artists today.

February 6, 2007 at 07:00 AM · Yake! I didn't pay enough attention to the question. Sorry, I meant David but now I'd say it's Mutter.

February 6, 2007 at 07:00 AM · Hilary Hahn I think is, and of course Perlman is a household name.

February 6, 2007 at 07:11 AM · Joshua Bell has got to be the most bankable, commercially successful of all of them.

February 6, 2007 at 07:19 AM · Definitely Itzhak Perlman, but out of the ones you mentioned, I'd say Joshua Bell.

February 6, 2007 at 08:00 AM · Why does Joshua Bell's playing leave me cold?

February 6, 2007 at 08:47 AM · yea... let's avoid that issue... someone asked a valid question.

February 6, 2007 at 11:51 AM · A funny tool to show trends or popularity is Google Trends. You can find an explanation how it works here. Naturally it's no evidence, but it's interesting, if you compare Joshua Bells graph in the US with the one in Europe or Asia. The tool isn't that bad to point out the interests of people (as an example).

February 6, 2007 at 12:21 PM · cough, cough, andre.

February 6, 2007 at 02:57 PM · I'd have to say Joshua Bell, as he's the only classical violinist I know of who has legions of adoring teenage female fans--the guy's like a pop star! He's also the first name mentioned to me by well-meaning strangers who have no idea about classical music when they find out I'm a violinist. (that or Vanessa Mae, which I just pretend never happened.)

February 6, 2007 at 03:44 PM · A mysterious letter arrives in the post office. It is addressed "to the world's best violinist". A music-loving employee forwards the letter to Perlman, who, when finding the letter in the mail, refuses to take it, suggesting that it should be sent to Vengerov. Vengerov thinks, this is not me, and has the letter forwarded to Hilary Hahn. Hilary, adamant in her self-criticism as ever, says the letter mustn't go to her but should go to Nigel Kennedy. Nigel, finally, opens it. The first line reads "Cher Monsieur Rieu!"

February 6, 2007 at 03:54 PM · The question says "soloist"...definitely Yo-Yo Ma. I believe he and Perlman get about the same fee per concert, while Bell gets slightly less. So I have to go with Perlman for now, but I'm pretty sure Bell is going to take that over soon. Shaham is definitely way up there...maybe if he dyes his hair blonde and works on his posture. Vannessa Mae has to be close to Perlman, though I guess she doesn't technically count as a soloist.

February 6, 2007 at 04:14 PM · I know 4 of them but who is Vanessa Mae--never heard of her until I came here. I vote for Bell--he's got the best press machine though I'm sure Perlman is still in everyone's consciousness.

February 6, 2007 at 04:18 PM · Good for you Jay...perhaps you're better off not looking into that.

February 6, 2007 at 05:05 PM · in terms of record sales last year, 2 are on the top and neither play violins:)

yo yo ma plays the cello and and andre plays the crowd:)

then again, read this:)

http://www.news24.com/News24/Entertainment/Abroad/0,9294,2-1225-1243_1920331,00.html

February 6, 2007 at 04:54 PM · Jay, Vanessa Mae is a cheesy pop-crossover violinist. I personally can't stand her, but she's very popular...

See:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vanessa_Mae

February 6, 2007 at 06:11 PM · Brian,

I think Yoyo has the hightest fee of any soloist, but don't quote me. It's true that Perlman probably makes more money per concert, but the fact is that he isn't recording much and isn't performing as much as Joshua Bell is. Bell has a whole publicity machine behind him, and at this point he's undoubtedly making the most money.

I think it showed a lot though that Mr. Perlman was asked to play at the Oscars. To me he'll always be the king.

February 6, 2007 at 06:19 PM · For "soloist", I'd have to agree with Yo-Yo Ma. For "violinist", my money would be on Perlman; even though Joshua Bell has that rock-star fame, it's still largely limited to those who know something about the classical music world. Perlman, I believe, is more of a household name, if only because he's much older and has had an established career for longer.

To answer the question "widely known", we all need to take a poll of our friends and acquaintances who aren't into classical music (if we have any who fit into that category :) ). I asked our 17-year-old German exchange student, who devoutly hates classical music, and she'd never heard of Anne-Sophie Mutter or even Yo-Yo Ma, at which point I decided to give up.

February 6, 2007 at 06:59 PM · Got to be Andre Rieu.

February 7, 2007 at 11:28 AM · Hi,

Interesting question... To me Josh's career, though considerable overseas seems primarily North American. I would love to see what some of our European colleagues have to say on this topic.

Perlman is Perlman. His slow departure from the scene feels like the end of an era.

Cheers!

February 7, 2007 at 12:58 PM · Bell seems to be the name that flashes up mostly but is his success largely down to his bankable good looks (although he is without doubt a talented player. but will he be remembered for his looks rather than his talent compared to some of the greats Sir yehudi menuhin, Oistrack , stern etc. Where as Pearlman can only be remembered for one thing...his talent. then again you don't eat without commercial success so who's the over all winner

February 7, 2007 at 01:55 PM · Martha Argerich folks!!!

February 7, 2007 at 02:49 PM · Good comments everyone. But we really could use someone who's in arts marketing to chime in.

February 7, 2007 at 04:17 PM · Everyone on this website is in arts marketing.

:) Sandy

February 7, 2007 at 04:20 PM · In Europe, they hear alot of Nicolai Znaider, Julian Rachlin, and Vengerov. Mutter BTW, is retiring.

I do believe that Josh is one of the few prodigies who made a very succesful transition in becoming an artist (not to mention a superstar).

February 7, 2007 at 05:44 PM · Unfortunately Joe (Joanne) Sixpack hasn't heard of any of them. Why expect him to have heard of Josh Bell when he doesn't even know who Dick Cheney is?

But Josh Bell is probably the best known among those people who know of at least one soloist (or vice president).

February 7, 2007 at 06:26 PM · There are ways that marketers have to access target audiences to determine how to serve the needs of those audiences. They can be any demographic, income level, etc. It doesn't have to be 18-35 year old males who constitute the demographic most targeted by advertisers.

Or we could just make it up on the fly. It's generally pretty obvious - and we've hit on all the big names.

I just think it's interesting to see how marketers determine what we are buying. And it applies to anything be it rock music, shampoo, television sets...and classical music!

There are a lot of really good players out there who don't get the pub of the "superstars." (myself, and most of us here, NOT included!)

February 7, 2007 at 06:42 PM · I would pick J. B.. Jack Benny that is. I believe he is still 39 years old.

February 7, 2007 at 07:09 PM · I'd never heard of Rieu until he was mentioned on this forum....and that was maybe one year ago. I almost never hear of him (but he's never performed in my neck of the woods)

February 7, 2007 at 07:38 PM · Rieu is the new "waltz king." He has lavish concerts of light classical and popular music, and he leads his orchestra with his violin from the podium, talks to his audience, and is a great crowd pleaser. He gets massive and enthusiastic audiences all over the world. As a violinist....But a great showman.

Sandy

February 7, 2007 at 07:57 PM · I know it wasn't mentioned, but strings wise, what about Yo Yo Ma?

-Ross Christopher

www.rosschristopher.com

www.theviolinstudio.net

February 7, 2007 at 09:26 PM · Gen,

Mutter isn't actually retiring. That was an erroneous article printed about a statement she made some years ago.

February 7, 2007 at 11:25 PM · I love Hilary Hahn and Sophie for violin and who can forget Yo Yo Ma! I was neveer a fan of Vanessa Mae, but some of her stuff grow on you.

February 8, 2007 at 01:46 AM · Andrew,

I heard she wants to focus on being a mom...........

and yes, Yo Yo Ma for sure is a superstar.

February 8, 2007 at 03:08 AM · And I'm pretty sure I saw something in the Strad about her retiring as well.

February 8, 2007 at 04:18 AM · Christian, Mischa's link to the graph addresses that. Take a look. Very interesting.

February 8, 2007 at 07:23 AM · If it's about artists generally, then it must be Lang Lang. He's almost omnipresent: at the opening of the world cup, in TV-Shows, Talkshows, he's rather telegenic. Many friends of me, who usually just owned one classical recording (samplers named "Classical for lovers" or "Romances") now own two. And in Asia Lang Lang is said to be truely a real superstar.

February 8, 2007 at 08:09 AM · Josh Bell is also quite hot in Japan.

February 8, 2007 at 10:28 AM · what about pianist Martha Argerich?

February 8, 2007 at 11:38 AM · Probably it's really Natalie MacMaster, but I suppose music beyond the symphonic repitore doesn't count!

February 8, 2007 at 01:34 PM · "...Vanessa Mae is a cheesy pop-crossover violinist. I personally can't stand her, but she's very popular..."

Maura, that wasn't very nice... so you are saying all of us (me, bell, Mae, Perlman, GC, etc.) who also play pop are cheesy?

I'll make sure to remember your name in the professional world!

Regards,

Peter

February 8, 2007 at 01:50 PM · So, a girl's not entitled to her opinion? Wow, what a world we live in today!

February 8, 2007 at 02:27 PM · NO.... Hahaha, I'm just having some fun with it!!!

Sure we are all entitled to our opinions, but it's all in the wording and how you voice your opinions about peoples hard work!

Let's look at it:

"...Vanessa Mae is a cheesy pop-crossover violinist. I personally can't stand her, but she's very popular..."

VS..

Vanessa Mae is very popular, but I just don't like her pop-crossover playing style!

What do you think?

Regards,

Peter

February 8, 2007 at 03:08 PM · Perlman performed on the Academy awards in 2001 and 2006, and those programs are seen by alot of people, so that might help make him the most widely known, though if you went up to people on the street and said "quick, name a violinist" it would depend on where you are. Here in Norway it would be Arve Tellefsen for sure.

February 8, 2007 at 03:36 PM · William: I aIready mentionned Martha Argerich who is , since Kreisler, Heifetz , Rachmaninov and Horowitz the most famous and legendary soloist of all times, but noone ,except you and me, seems to know about her...Joshua Bell is popular but will he make history?Ginette Neveu did with a career that last only 5 years and incomparable interpretations of Brahms and Sibelius concerti along with few other recordings wich consist of her only testimony...

I will add that big names with big publicity behind ( I do not mean for Argerich and few others) does not mean a great artist...Some are very popular, but bring no novelty and originality in their playing and interpretations...

Marc

February 8, 2007 at 05:47 PM · Peter--cripes, sorry for stating my opinion.

I apologize if I offended my colleagues who also play pop music--I don't really have a problem with playing pop music (or, in my case, bad gypsy tunes), it's just Vanessa-Mae's particular brand of it that I can't stand.

But as for your comment "I'll make sure to remember your name in the professional world!"...sir, just what exactly did you mean by that?!

February 8, 2007 at 05:51 PM · I have to agree with Maura (for a change ;) )

I think it's Ms. Mae that is cheesy, not necessarily the genre, just her way of doing it.

February 8, 2007 at 06:55 PM · Maura,

Don't be upset, like I stated above... just having some fun! I do think people should make a better choice of words when voicing their thoughts. That is all!!

I'll make sure to remember your name in the professional world!"

means just that! With all due respect... You are a tough critic!!!

Are we still friends??? I hope so!!!

Best regards,

Peter

February 8, 2007 at 07:05 PM · What about Midori?

She's wonderful. But I suppose she is not

widely known.

Joshua Bell and Itzhak Perlman are definitely more common names, but not the only wonderful players.

However, there are quite a few Bell-Bashers out there. I personally love his playing, but many don't.

February 8, 2007 at 07:14 PM · I think Ms. Goto's performance schedual and list of accolades suggests that in the classical world, she doesn't have any problems with name recognition.

February 8, 2007 at 07:21 PM · Peter, no hard feelings. I'm quite touchy right now as I'm stressed about looming auditions. :) The "I'll remember your name..." comment was a bit ambiguous though, coming as it did at the end of an admonishment. (I had terrible visions of you trying to organize boycotts of my concerts based on my unintentionally snarky remarks, LOL!) So yes, we're still friends.

PS Yes, I am a tough critic. It's either my few drops of Hungarian blood or my 19th-century tendencies in music. :) (Sometimes I imagine myself on the front lines of the War of the Romantics--in your FACE, Eduard Hanslick!)

February 8, 2007 at 08:30 PM · Hey, guys, all of you "purists" out there. I repeat - Andre Rieu. If he isn't the most "popular" and biggest selling violinist out there, I'd be surprised.

On the other hand, I've been surprised before. And in addition, I really do get tired of the light classical fare pretty quickly (with the exception of violin encore pieces).

Sandy

February 8, 2007 at 08:34 PM · Greetings,

It depends so much on where you are. Midori is perhaps teh only violinst anybody in Japan can either recall or isntantly recognize. But her foundation does so much work for children and in schools ther eis probnably a lot of extra recogniton there.

My proble is I'm cheesy and can't cross over. In spite of frequent requests

to do so.(River Styx)

Cheers,

Buri

February 8, 2007 at 09:22 PM · Ugh, andre reiu... 2 words: sell out.

Honestly, I think Itzhak Perlman is probably best known. I cant tell you how many people who arent even into music know who he is.

February 8, 2007 at 10:00 PM · Has anyone mentioned Vadim Repin?? Living in Africa as I do (South Africa) I can't give a fair opinion on the artist most in demand, but I have a couple of his cds and they are sublime!

February 8, 2007 at 10:01 PM · Ole Bill Monroe hasn't done bad for himself in American culture.

February 8, 2007 at 11:28 PM · The most commercially successful violinists performing today are Boyd Tinsley (violinist in the Dave Matthews Band) and Martie Maguire (violinist/multi-instrumentalist in The Dixie Chicks). The Dave Matthews Band and the Dixie Chicks have been certified by the RIAA for having sold 30 million albums each, and both bands earn over $20 million in live revenue per year on a multi-year basis.

The most successful international violinist is Vanessa Mae. She's sold over 8 million albums worldwide and she tours overseas, which is something Boyd and Martie don't do.

As far as i can tell, the most successful classical violinist is Nigel Kennedy. I did a Google Adwords search and his name came up with the most hits overall. Itzhak Perlman and Joshua Bell came up more sporadically. My guess is that fans look for infomation on their own volition while Perlman and Joshua Bell receive more hits immediately after their media appearances and press releases.

As far as the most famous classical violinist today, i hate to say it but NO violinist in classical music today is truly famous. Classical violinists today are well-known to classical music fans and ignored outside of the genre.

February 9, 2007 at 01:47 AM · Hey, look on the bright side... No paparazzi!

February 9, 2007 at 11:00 AM · >"...Vanessa Mae is a cheesy pop-crossover violinist. I personally can't stand her, but she's very popular..."

>Maura, that wasn't very nice... so you are saying all of us (me, bell, Mae, Perlman, GC, etc.) who also play pop are cheesy?

Naw, but then, all those pictures with Perlman, rising from the sea in a wet see-through top, might make judgement difficult. :-)

February 9, 2007 at 12:20 PM · ...um...Henny Youngman was a considerable violinist and used to use it as a prop...anyone recall what tune he'd use to begin his "shtick" ?? Was this "crossover" Humor/music ? Does a one-liner count as a cadenza ?

February 9, 2007 at 12:28 PM · allow me, generally there are 2 types of cheese, each with very distinctive flavor and after-taste:

1. musically liberated regardless of tradition.

2. showing breasts and legs:), and play violin.

i have no problem with 1, but because of viewer discretion issues, i have problem with 2 in my house. darn.

February 9, 2007 at 12:24 PM · The one with the most recognition on the internet, the one garnering the most hits when you put his name in google is Perlman followed by Bell. Though surprisingly a cellist has the violinists beat by a large margin. Yo Yo Ma might be the most famous classical musician if you use the internet criteria. I think the internet is a good indicator of global popularity but I can't be sure as to which one makes the most money.

February 9, 2007 at 05:00 PM · Ah, Henny Youngman - my idol. It was Henny Youngman who said...

"I have all the money I'll ever need, if I die by 4 o'clock."

It was Henny Youngman who said...

"The marriage started out great, but then on the way DOWN from the altar...."

:) Sandy

February 9, 2007 at 05:00 PM · Ah, Henny Youngman - my idol. It was Henny Youngman who said...

"I have all the money I'll ever need, if I die by 4 o'clock."

It was Henny Youngman who said...

"The marriage started out great, but then on the way DOWN from the altar...."

:) Sandy

February 9, 2007 at 05:36 PM · >Maura, Don't be upset, like I stated above... just having some fun!

Peter, your replies were supposed to be "fun?" They got MY adrenaline going. Maybe instead of admonishing Maura on how she should phrase her criticism of an overmarketed musician, you should focus on how your replies sound. Because it did not sound the least bit like "having some fun!" to me.

And Maura, as always, you are a champ for replying constructively and not flaring back. Um. Like I just did.

Entertaining thread. I vote for Yo-Yo and Josh.

February 9, 2007 at 05:35 PM · >The most commercially successful violinists performing today are Boyd Tinsley (violinist in the Dave Matthews Band) and Martie Maguire (violinist/multi-instrumentalist in The Dixie Chicks). The Dave Matthews Band and the Dixie Chicks have been certified by the RIAA for having sold 30 million albums each, and both bands earn over $20 million in live revenue per year on a multi-year basis.

The most successful international violinist is Vanessa Mae. She's sold over 8 million albums worldwide and she tours overseas, which is something Boyd and Martie don't do.

As far as i can tell, the most successful classical violinist is Nigel Kennedy. I did a Google Adwords search and his name came up with the most hits overall. Itzhak Perlman and Joshua Bell came up more sporadically. My guess is that fans look for infomation on their own volition while Perlman and Joshua Bell receive more hits immediately after their media appearances and press releases.

As far as the most famous classical violinist today, i hate to say it but NO violinist in classical music today is truly famous. Classical violinists today are well-known to classical music fans and ignored outside of the genre.

**

D Wright, would love to argue with you, but I must say this is all well-put and difficult to argue with.

Although I WILL say (I mean, really, not argue? Moi?) that Yo-Yo is known in the mainstream non-classical music world, which I know, because I live in it and 99% of my friends do as well. But would I be a snob if I said that 99% of them are college-educated and listen to NPR and perhaps THAT's why they know them?

Whoops, potentially un-PC, inflammatory comment. Boy, I seem to be out to pick fights today, don't I? (Momentary remorse over snarky reply to Peter F., enough to ponder removing or editing aforementioned reply, but then, not enough to actually do it.)

February 9, 2007 at 09:10 PM · Terez,

You are entitled to your opinion!

Best regards,

Peter

February 9, 2007 at 09:55 PM · I have to disagree too (isn't that what the internet is for?) I think Yo Yo and Perlman at least have good name recognition. Better than Nigel, better than Mark O'Connor, ironically. Much better name recognition than any fiddler, so you can feel good about that. That's what you mean by widely-known I suppose. According to google at least, Vanessa Mae is mainly a European thing.

February 9, 2007 at 11:06 PM · Peter,

"I will certainly remember your name in the professional world"...???

That hardly sounds like playing/joking around. That sounds much more like an intimidating, threatening remark, which Maura's innocent OPINION of pop music certainly did not warrant. In fact, your response to Maura will make your name more recognizable to these violinists. That's okay, though, right?? There is no such thing as bad publicity, correct?...just ask Madonna or other "pop" icons...

Anyways, I definitely agree with the remark that violinists differ by fame and reputation depending on their continent. Anne-Sophie is a household name in Germany, as is Midori in Japan, as Chung in Korea. Yo-Yo is probably the most recognizable name worldwide, I would imagine...

February 10, 2007 at 01:23 AM · Teretz, you're right. Yo Yo Ma is very famous, especially here in Toronto. Ma (as well as Cecilia Bartoli and Luciano Pavarotti) are household names and i would have loved to include them - but i left them out of the discussion because they're not violinists (as per the original question).

I wish we had more famous violinists, especially now. We are living in a golden age of amazingly talented violinists and i wish the general public would take more notice of them.

February 10, 2007 at 02:31 AM · As for me, I wish people would distinguish between "violinst" and "entertainer who plays the violin at roughly Suzuki Bk. 10 level or so while distracting the audience (who are all-too-happy to be distracted so they need to learn nothing, know nothing, and can just go with the loudest of mass movements) with gimmickry of all sorts, from the most blatant and unimaginative sexual innuendo to pseudo-emotive playacting and grimacing."

I suppose saying "violinist" is easier. But wouldn't it be great if there were another word to mean all of the other stuff? Hmm. Oh, yeah, there is. Pop "artist". Or there's...well, all sorts of uncomplimentary stuff.

February 10, 2007 at 12:00 PM · I'm afraid Peter ruined an otherwise valid point by making the same mistake he was criticizing. I always find it unsettling when someone makes an unneccesarily biting or derragatory comment about a performing artist. Rule of thumb, "don't write something about another violinist on a violinist forum that you would be uncomfortable saying in a personal letter to said violinist." I'll bet plenty of performing artists like Ms. Mae read this forum, and I for one hope that they feel welcome enough to contribute.

February 10, 2007 at 12:39 PM · What is meant by internationally successful? Outside US? Or outside Europe? Commercially successful is close to impossible to say, since we do not know the expense levels etc.

Just one detail here: even a Platinum classical CD does not necessarily mean profit for the record company, same for the recording artist.

FMF

February 10, 2007 at 03:19 PM · "don't write something about another violinist on a violinist forum that you would be uncomfortable saying in a personal letter to said violinist."

That is my point Christian, but I don't mean to offend or threaten anyone by it. It just seems you are the only one who perhaps understood my point.

Andrew, I’m sure I am not perfect but then again neither are you. If I remember correctly you have gotten some “negative” remarks back on one of your past posts also.

"In fact, your response to Maura will make your name more recognizable to these violinists. That's okay, though, right?? There is no such thing as bad publicity, correct?..."

I’m really not worried to be honest with you!!!

I am entitled to my opinion and as I already told Maura I did not mean to be offensive or threatening and for that I apologized.

As for my initial statement and what I really meant to bring across:

… it's all in the wording and how you voice your opinions about peoples hard work!

Let's look at it:

"...Vanessa Mae is a cheesy pop-crossover violinist. I personally can't stand her, but she's very popular..."

VS..

Vanessa Mae is very popular, but I just don't like her pop-crossover playing style!

I AM STANDING BY IT!!!!

Best regards,

Peter

February 10, 2007 at 05:27 PM · Fine. Vanessa Mae is very popular, but I personally can't stand her. Happy now?

I honestly don't see much difference between the two statements, I thought it was fairly clear that my "cheesy" remark was a personal opinion. I apologize to Ms. Mae if she is indeed reading this and I offended her.

February 10, 2007 at 06:08 PM · Peter's choice: "Vanessa Mae is very popular, but I just don't like her pop-crossover playing style."

Terez's choice: "Vanessa Mae is very popular, but I just don't like her cheesy pop-crossover playing style."

Because, Peter. I mean, c'mon. There's some cheese going on there. $$ and cult-worship aside, do you really think she can hold a candle to your level of playing, in a Bach partita or something like that?

Okay. Wait. Confession time. Before I'd even heard of V. Mae but was exploring violin repertoire recordings, maybe two years ago, I got a copy of a CD with Bach's Partita #3 from the library. I found it to be quite lovely. Um... three guesses who the artist was? And no cheese to be found anywhere. She nicely rendered Bruch's "Scottish Fantasy" as well.

So. It just goes to show you. Um, not sure WHAT it goes to show you, but I'm sure there's a lesson on life in there for me somewhere.

PS: Peter, I think we understood what you were trying to say. It's just that Christian said it prettier!

February 10, 2007 at 08:29 PM · Just for the record, when i made my statements, i did not put my own personal biases into my responses.

I mentioned certain violinists who i believe fit the original poster's question regarding popular success, international acclaim, top touring gross, or successful marketing communications.

Just because a performer is popular, doesn't mean they're good. It also doesn't mean they're bad. I have my own biases as we all do, but i kept them to myself.

February 10, 2007 at 08:26 PM · anything out of a person is personal:)

February 10, 2007 at 08:31 PM · D Wright,

""As far as the most famous classical violinist today, i hate to say it but NO violinist in classical music today is truly famous. Classical violinists today are well-known to classical music fans and ignored outside of the genre. ""

I think you have hit the nail in it's head and you are correct, I second your opinion.

Peter

February 10, 2007 at 08:38 PM · >FMF: What is meant by internationally successful? Outside US? Or outside Europe?<

I consider international to be both within the European market, and all markets beyond Europe and America. Why? Europe is now considered a region but has a centuries-old history of being made up of different countries. On the other hand, the USA is made up of states and not countries; it is a true domestic market and always has been. Therefore, to my definition, measuring sales in say New York and Florida would be national while sales in Germany and Italy or Singapore and South Korea would be international.

DMB and the Dixie Chicks are huge in the USA but have no real presence in say, Indonesia. On the other hand, Vanessa Mae is popular all over Europe and also in the far east. She also tours both regions. That to my mind qualifies her as international.

as far as success, well if VM is worth $32 million, i'd say that's pretty successful. I'm guessing the members of DMB and DC are worth even more.

February 10, 2007 at 08:44 PM · Peter,

I really disagree with both of you.

If you ask a person who is not up on classical music, they could actually tell you that they know of Yo Yo Ma, Nigel Kennedy, Joshua Bell and Itzhak Perlman.

These guys have made many appearances on TV shows across the globe, and they have recorded soundtracks for major motion pictures.

As for Vannesa M, her music style is self-described as "violin techno-acoustic fusion", and for those who dig the techno style, she has mass appeal. Outside of the techno crowd (in the classical world), most consider her "unique".

(Despite that reality, she laughs her way to the bank no doubt).

Vive la Difference!

February 10, 2007 at 08:47 PM · >Gennady Filimonov: Peter, I really disagree with both of you.<

Both of him?

February 10, 2007 at 08:48 PM · G.F.,

You also got me lost on your response!

????

Peter

February 10, 2007 at 08:53 PM · I addressed my post to Peter's last post in which he agreed with you D Wright.

Hence my statement, directed at both D Wright and Peter.

As you know, sometimes as you post, other posts appear.

Is it crystal clear now?

Since we got off the subject a bit, I will reiterate what I've said:

I really disagree with both of you.

If you ask a person who is not up on classical music, they could actually tell you that they know of Yo Yo Ma, Nigel Kennedy, Joshua Bell and Itzhak Perlman.

These guys have made many appearances on TV shows across the globe, and they have recorded soundtracks for major motion pictures.

As for Vannesa M, her music style is self-described as "violin techno-acoustic fusion", and for those who dig the techno style, she has mass appeal. Outside of the techno crowd (in the classical world), most consider her "unique".

(Despite that reality, she laughs her way to the bank no doubt).

Vive la Difference!

February 10, 2007 at 09:36 PM · >As you know, sometimes as you post, other posts appear.

Ha ha, that is so true. You have to admit, Gennady, it IS a funny image to read your words with D. Wright's interception in it (Really, now, DW, how could you be so RUDE?). Now, if it were someone vaguely psycho whose comment you were responding to, like ((pick your favorite psycho v.com member and insert name here)), it would have made PERFECT sense.

In fact, Terez just told me she agreed with what I wrote.

No I didn't.

Yes you did.

Don't start this here. Not online. Not in front of everyone.

Don't blame me. You started it.

Oh, dear...

February 10, 2007 at 09:37 PM · >Just for the record, when i made my statements, i did not put my own personal biases into my responses.

That's why they were such good ones. Easier said than done, for me.

February 11, 2007 at 07:27 PM · >Gennady Filimonov: I addressed my post to Peter's last post in which he agreed with you D Wright. Hence my statement, directed at both D Wright and Peter.<

D'oh! *takes foot out of mouth*

February 11, 2007 at 08:21 PM · D Wright:

"D'oh! *takes foot out of mouth* "

Is that your idea of sarcasm? You are an insult to mentally challenged people?!

Your IQ resembles the weather in Toronto (where you say you are from):

-6°C but feels like -15°C, (Partly Cloudy).

Why don't you disclose your true identity, so we know who it is that is trying to be insulting for no reason.

Making insults and hiding behind your fake identity will not shield you for long. If you know what I mean................

If you want to contribute to this thread, stay on topic.

February 11, 2007 at 08:22 PM · ?

You thought that was an insult?

February 11, 2007 at 08:33 PM · I said:

You are an insult to mentally challenged people.

and

Your IQ resembles the weather in Toronto (where you say you are from):

-6°C but feels like -15°C, (Partly Cloudy).

February 11, 2007 at 08:42 PM · D Wright or "D'oh Wrong" (or whatever your name is),

get back on topic of this thread, 'cause this thread is almost over.

February 11, 2007 at 10:52 PM · almost.

February 11, 2007 at 11:18 PM · Gennady's on a roll.

February 11, 2007 at 11:18 PM · Who do you all think is the most commercially and internationally successful violinist performing today?

Nigel Kennedy

Vanessa Mae

Maxim vengerov

Anne Sophie Mutter

or Joshua Bell

February 12, 2007 at 12:12 AM · This discussion is out of control....

To bad!

Peter

February 12, 2007 at 12:41 AM · Who do you all think is the most commercially and internationally successful violinist performing today?

February 12, 2007 at 12:41 AM · Who do you all think is the most commercially and internationally successful violinist performing today ?

February 12, 2007 at 12:42 AM · sorry for the double post, but the computer key must be sticky.

Perhaps Yo Yo Ma, Perlman, Bell, Kennedy and Hahn.

This discussion has been archived and is no longer accepting responses.

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