money, happiness and living up to others' expectation?

November 23, 2006 at 03:01 AM · it seems that Andre and Vannessa have learned to play violin and made their money doing what they like to do... is that enough?

for classically trained players, is there an invisible standard that they have to live up to?

performing art? entertainment?

what do you think?:)

Replies (51)

November 23, 2006 at 03:15 AM · when i first submitted this question, to the best of my knowledge, i thought i addressed the players as andre rieu and vannessa mae, just to clarify:)

November 23, 2006 at 03:34 AM · I don't know about other people, but I have never been into these two entertainers/musicians/artists (whatever have you). I found too much distraction in their performance, e.g. special effects. I would to hear MUSIC!

Years ago, a couple of my Indian colleagues were listening to Mae's CD. Although I didn't know who Mae was, I took Vengerov from my CD player and offered it to them. Immediately, these guys switched to Vengerov's camp.

Although I must say Mae is gorgeous, I still perfer old fashion concert, solo or orchestra.

November 23, 2006 at 04:05 AM · despite what we think, these guys have mass appeal on a "ground level" (with the folk who think that they are playing classical music).

On one hand, it is great for bringing a new audience to a "semi-classical" forum. Perhaps those same people may get interested in hearing Vengerov, Hahn, Repin, and so on etc.

BTW, I hear V. Mae has been dropped by SONY.

November 23, 2006 at 01:53 PM · I can't help but wonder if Andre and Vanessa look at themselves in the mirror in the morning and turn away in disgust.

The salesman/marketer in them is surely high five-ing their reflection, but the tender artist? Surely something had to be stifled and/or buried a long time ago. That is the nature of art versus commerce.

Will never forget the funny scene in Woody Allen's film Bullets Over Broadway where John Cusak, a sensitive writer artist type, sits up in bed where he's been lying sleepless, fretting over his "success' in finding a major Broadway gig (and pandering to the Mobster producers), and cries out "I'm a wh*re!" ((Insert an "o" there if you didn't catch that.))

Selling out works for a lot of people. Lucky lucky them. Or are they so lucky? Usually one only finds these answers in the twilight hours of one's life.

November 23, 2006 at 02:00 PM · >I can't help but wonder if Andre and Vanessa look at themselves in the mirror in the morning and turn away in disgust.

I know that I look at the CD covers of Andre with his cheesy smile and turn away in disgust. : )

November 23, 2006 at 02:01 PM · >BTW, I hear V. Mae has been dropped by SONY.

No WAY. Why??? Like you said, her mainstream appeal draws in a LOT of buyers. My goodness...

November 23, 2006 at 02:25 PM · "Will never forget the funny scene in Woody Allen's film Bullets Over Broadway where John Cusak, a sensitive writer artist type, sits up in bed where he's been lying sleepless, fretting over his "success' in finding a major Broadway gig (and pandering to the Mobster producers), and cries out "I'm a wh*re!" ((Insert an "o" there if you didn't catch that.))"

But Cusak's character was no artist, the mobster was! Oh, the irony!!

Remember the opening of the film? I believe the first line was spoken by Cusak: "I'm an artist."

That was a great movie, wasn't it? :)

I saw an interview with Andre, and he seemed like a pretty sincere guy. He said he was miserable being in an orchestra, and was going to quit and open a pizza parlor or something. I can't remember how it blossomed into what it is today.... Anyway, he seemed like a warm, caring person.

November 23, 2006 at 02:50 PM · >But Cusak's character was no artist, the mobster was! Oh, the irony!!

Oh, now I'm remembering that part - how the mobster helped John C. over his writer's block, or something like that? And in the end ((major spoiler here...)) he shoots talentless bimbo Olive because he couldn't BEAR to hear the way she was destroying the art of the scripted words?

I'm going to need to rent that movie again. It's just chalk-full of great stuff.

And thanks for the perspective on Andre, William. Always good to hear the other side. I really, really wish, however, that his CD covers weren't so cheesy. (Not all of them are horrific, but at the library where I work, I see the same one over and over again and it makes me cringe. But you know what? I see it so much because it circulates so much. There you have it. Christmas music - it gets checked out year-round. Who checks out Christmas music in July?! In August?! I'm here to tell you - people do. Lots.)

November 23, 2006 at 02:55 PM · And BTW, William - good to see you back, posting here!

November 23, 2006 at 03:54 PM · Yes, the mobster shot the bimbo, because he couldn't stand her destroying HIS words! What a great movie.

Thanks for the welcome back.

Happy day, Thanksgiving and/or otherwise!

November 23, 2006 at 04:49 PM · hi terez, i read your responses with mouthful of chuckles:) thanks.

saw that you have a novel with a violinist character. have to divulge!

male or female? let me guess... female! tell us more!

(in case it is male, i bet he has long hair with very very white teeth..and loves waltz!:) )

happy eating today!

November 23, 2006 at 07:09 PM · >(in case it is male, i bet he has long hair with very very white teeth..and loves waltz!:) )

Oh, Al, I'm LAUGHING!

My novel-writing journey is archived right here, actually. Read all about it, folks, in my blog! ((Yes, a not so subtle advertisement to pop over there and read all about ME.)) Seriously, tho, the January archive helps introduce the project.

But, to give you a quick idea - the violinist is one of three main characters whose stories merge together when it becomes clear a stalker has targeted one of them. Here's the little character synopsis I'm including in my query letter out to agents:

Montserrat, a world-class violinist, recently received the opportunity to jump-start her sagging career when a famous cellist invited her to join his quartet for an upcoming performance. The catch: the other violinist in the quartet is none other than David, her nemesis from conservatory days, eight years earlier. An accident back then prevented him from competing in a prestigious international violin competition that she went on to win. She knows more about that accident than she cares to admit. And now, David’s alternating interest and hostility toward her during rehearsals lead her to wonder if he knows something.

November 23, 2006 at 07:52 PM · Aren't the personal dynamics in quartets great?! :)

November 23, 2006 at 08:23 PM · >Aren't the personal dynamics in quartets great?! :)

My character is a soloist having to play second violin to an arrogant former classmate who also has a soloist mentality. Can you imagine the dynamics there?! Made my adrenaline rise just to write the dialogue btwn them.

November 23, 2006 at 08:23 PM · [quote]

I saw an interview with Andre, and he seemed like a pretty sincere guy. He said he was miserable being in an orchestra, and was going to quit and open a pizza parlor or something. I can't remember how it blossomed into what it is today.... Anyway, he seemed like a warm, caring person.

[/quote]

He looks like one as well. But the problem is I am not really moved by his performance as a music audience. Although I will take Rieu and Mae over Madona or Spears or the Simpson girls, it doesn't really say much. I never can figure out why the latter can command such attention, power and wealth even though...

I guess I am just one of the people, who don't really need or welcome "commercial" entertainment.

November 23, 2006 at 08:17 PM · terez, thanks, will definitely look them up now you pointed the way. stalker, violin competition, power struggle,,, i hear strings popping!

are you going to sell out to make it a blockbuster like andre/vannessa or is this going to be a personal academic venture?;)

the main characters play old cremonese or antiqued ones from recent VSA winners?:)

November 23, 2006 at 09:53 PM · Terez, being second violin is really under-rated, in fact I prefer it. :) But relations with the first violinist can indeed be a little touchy!

November 26, 2006 at 06:42 AM · Terez,

It looks as if Andre Rieu might have been distgusted by having to put on the same tux 3 days a week and play the same 20 symphonies for essentially the same group of people for the rest of his life. I don't listen to these two artist's albums or attend their concerts, but I understand what they've done and respect them. Why do I respect them? Because they bring classical music to a wider range of people than any orchestra or soloist. Maybe this experience can make going to see a symphony orchestra more approachable to the average person.

For the overwhelming majority of musicians (violinists included), life is not about "prestigious international violin competitions" or backstabbing "conservatory nemesis". It's about playing music and keeping the passion for music through failed auditions and disappointments while trying to make enough money to live comfortably. In this respect, if you are disgusted by Andre Rieu, you might as well be disgusted by anybody who set out with dreams of a "glorius" life in the classical music world as a soloist or member of a respected orchestra and had to "settle" with a second rate orchestra job, teaching job, or playing weddings on the weekend...or found out the first two options weren't as glorius as they thought. All these people have to play some music they don't want to play or teach some people they don't want to teach in order to make enough money. Does that make all those musicians sell outs? These two musicians don't have to do either one of those things.

November 26, 2006 at 03:15 PM · Well put, Brian. I suppose, in the end, the character I chose to write about is indeed more an Andre/Vanessa type than a "typical" musician. And, in the end, that does make me mercenary like A/V, because I chose to base a character on what would "sell." ((A character in peaceful pursuit of one's art, nourished by self and aforementioned vocation just doesn't get a publishing house's attention.)) Nope, I take that back. My novel will more than likely be characterized as too thoughtful/quiet and won't garner a sale. Not enough explosions and dead bodies. No vampires or snarky female detectives or paranormal buddies. (You can't imagine how hot those are right now. Particularly a combination of all three.) I may never get a novel published. But this is my equivalent of quietly devoting 35 hours a week to pursuing art and what nourishes my heart/soul, regardless of the monetary outcome.

((And just for the record -- my character looks at herself in the mirror one morning, sees what she's become, and retches into the sink.))

((And just for another record, I actually have an Andre Rieu Xmas album from before my violin playing days. I found it to be very pretty at the time. But even then I called his expression on his CD covers cheesy. Very cheesy.))

November 26, 2006 at 03:32 PM · >...they bring classical music to a wider range of people than any orchestra or soloist.

In spite of the other things I've said, I am in wholehearted agreement with you here. That's why I am a HUGE Joshua Bell fan. ((And I like his CD covers more, too!)) And musicians like Hilary Hahn who devote so much time and energy to outreach programs with kids -- so very very important. And, fortuitously, the music these two musicians make is eternally to my tastes.

November 26, 2006 at 03:27 PM · Long ago someone gave me some contrary advice: DON'T try to do what you love as a career. You will have to do too many boring things to make a living. Do it as a hobby, so you pick and choose what you do.

The specific example was a photographer who enjoyed doing nature photos, but had a portrait studio to pay the bills.

November 26, 2006 at 03:54 PM · But if you really love what you love to do, isn't all the annoying side stuff worth it?!

November 26, 2006 at 04:17 PM · >Long ago someone gave me some contrary advice: DON'T try to do what you love as a career. You will have to do too many boring things to make a living. Do it as a hobby, so you pick and choose what you do.

Eee! That is indeed contradictory advice. But, then again, the example you offered (a photographer who enjoyed doing nature photos, but had a portrait studio to pay the bills) this could be construed as someone who loved what he was doing - photography - and found a way to use it to make a living.

I was in sales for several years. Wrote whenever I could. It was not enough. My soul was trying to commit suicide. I numbered among the living dead as I drove to work, drudged through a day, drove home, spent weekends and off time trying to make myself happy with restaurant meals, getaways, gadgets, thrills.

Never never never again will I waste my life in a career that doesn't nourish me. Life is too short to spend 50 hours a week of it feeling dead inside. A "hobby" in this case just wasn't enough to counteract the weight of a despised job.

My solution? I'm not proud of it, but hey, it works. Marry someone who brings in enough salary for the whole household.((That looks as bad here as it sounds in my head, but what the heck, I'll keep it in. And hey, I didn't marry him BECAUSE he had $$. It's just a happy coincidence.)) My husband tells me he would rather see me happy, fulfilled and cash-poor than miserable and well-dressed the way I was when I was in sales.

Happy ending for me. I admit it. But I do put the hours all over the place to make it all work. And like Maura said, the annoying stuff (like never buying new clothes or eating out in restaurants anymore or getting up at 4am to write) is well worth it for the chance to do what I love.

November 26, 2006 at 04:24 PM · I do want to interject here that writing is no less of a job than sales. Less cash, but just as hard of work - if not more so!

November 26, 2006 at 04:04 PM · If I wasn't going into music or working in the field of music at the moment I would be a very depressed individual.

When you have a passion for something, you weigh out the importance of material possesion over job satisfaction (and maybe even job security for some) and determine whether or not you can be comfortable with less but enjoy what you are doing as a living. I would way rather work a few small boring jobs and still have the ability to pursue music over taking a desk job or pursuing something I wasn't really passionate about.

I personally would way rather live in a small house and be using an economic veichle veichle to get around and be content in my work. For me, also, not having the means to get some of these crazy expensive things people buy makes me appreciate what I have all the more and find the value in what's really important. It's not important if you drive a toyota vs. bmw the point is they both get you from point A to point B which is what a car is supposed to do so why spend 60,000 on something that does the same thing (and is probably better on gas and mileage) for under 20,000? Maybe I'm just weird....

November 26, 2006 at 06:30 PM · Emily and Kelsey - yup, and yup!

Okay, confession time - I still do like the material posessions from time to time! Champagne tastes on a jug wine income, I suppose. And yet, the jug wine really suits the writer persona, don't you think? I'm seeing a Paris coffee house, some crotchety Hemingway type, smoking Gitanes (naw... too expensive. Hand-rolled cigarettes, then), drinking a carafe of the house plonk, and then, after writhing in misery for six hours of not producing a single good sentence, writing a killer-good paragraph.

Ah.... art. Nothing satisfies quite like it. (Well, a few bucks for one's efforts goes a long way too, doesn't it?!)

November 26, 2006 at 07:22 PM · Kelsey,

Nope. You are not weird; the society is sick. In a capitalism society to the extreme, money is virtually what counts, and thus consumer spending is what capitalists push for.

I read an article the other days about Wal-mart. The WM big boss wanted to cut cost, and one of the branch managers altered workers' time card so that they could reduce the hours...

What does the little money from their lowly waged workers add to these WM big boss's bank accounts?

Oh yeah, I saw a little clip about Jessica Simpson's then new film (employee of the month?). I can hardly believe a (Christian) father would put his own daughter up on the big screen like a piece of meat...

After all that said, I'd say being "weird" is good.

November 27, 2006 at 06:37 AM · To go back to the original question:

If Andre and Vanessa are doing what they like to do, then it's enough.

November 27, 2006 at 07:05 AM · I dont' understand the question, beginning with what "invisible standard" means.

November 27, 2006 at 12:16 PM · jim, you always come up with the right answer though!:)

since this is a musician board, i was being more subtle.

it seems to be the case that many classical musicians with traditional classical musician careers have issues with people who branch off in pursuit of careers that are more mass oriented, if you will. some say, go for it! some say, Mmmm Mmmm Mmmmm, way too cheesy:)

November 27, 2006 at 02:22 PM · "It's not important if you drive a toyota vs. bmw"

bmw does not make people happpier if they are not happy to start with. neither does music.

happiness is different from escape from reality. usually people are more content or even happy if they are on track with achieving their goals in life and of life. good marriage and having children despite all their thorns are probably the best predictor of long term happiness. careers can help if they are meaningful, not even necessarily stimulating. money and music can help, but not much:)

November 27, 2006 at 02:37 PM · ITA Brian R. I thought about writing a similar observation, but you said it better than I ever could. My daughter became interested in the violin after seeing Vanessa Mae on a Disney Young Muscians Orchestra special. She wore her "gold dress" (because Vanessa was wearing a gold dress" and tried to make a violin "like Vanessas) for over a month. I am a classical music lover and she had been around it since birth BUT, it was seeing Vanessa Mae having what looked like so much fun with the Violin that made her want to play. This was at 2 years of age.I can honestly say had she not shown that initial interest we probably would not have sought out lessons for her. It has been totally life changing. Violin has touched not only her life in deep and profound ways, but my entire family including a 92 year old Great Grandmother. Heifetz is an Emperor among Violin Lords, but I'm pretty sure that seeing him play would have sparked no interest in my then 2 year old to play the violin.

November 27, 2006 at 02:47 PM · Happiness is a by-product of living a meaningful life (said by an existential psychologist I once read; I think it was Viktor Frankl).

Beauty is only skin deep, but ugly goes clean to the bone (one of Murphy's Laws).

Sandy

November 27, 2006 at 08:14 PM · "bmw does not make people happpier if they are not happy to start with. neither does music."

I am not too certain about this statement. Often people buy a BMW for the prestige, which often an indicator that these poeple feel "empty", or insecure consciously or otherwise. Music on the other hand is quite different. Just a reference: Busker (user name) posted his experience with two deaf children when he was busking...That should shed some light on my point.

November 27, 2006 at 08:38 PM · Thanks al, I can sometimes find an answer, but often not today.

Ok, so here's whatcha got...:)

Some classical musicians frown on other styles. Somewhere out there though someone's a connoisseur of Tom Jones and Cher and he'll tell you their bad stuff from their good stuff, in some kind of terms. I believe music is so abstract that it's hard to apply qualitative labels that work sometimes. "Meaningfulness" is highly personal, intimately connected to all the other details of one's life, which is why someone working in fast food can be happier than, say, the Mayor (I like Sander's recipe).

So yes, I'd say there is what you're calling an invisible standard. It isn't peculiar to music. It applies to the mayor and the fast food worker too. The title of "M.D." trumps all in that game, indicating the most superior person.

P.S. Vivian - I missed that and it sounds good.

November 28, 2006 at 12:18 AM · I agree with Jim M. I once knew someone who was autistic who worked in a mailroom. It allowed him to memorize trivia about everyone. Whenever he saw you he would tell you who he'd seen that day and where. (some people thought this was a little scary ;) )

He was one of the happiest people I'd ever met.

November 28, 2006 at 12:29 AM · I would say that working in a job that didn't involve music would be one of my fears, I couldn't think of anything worse.

However, of course, being male there is a large weight on my shoulders of being the "Bread winner" - I don't necessarily like it but I don't want to have to work so much to provide for a family that I don't have any time to spend with them.

You often hear that old adage "Money isn't everything" to which I say "Yes, but it certainly does help." I don't think that people (and I mean the general public) really understand how much work goes into being a musician, and how much of that work goes unpaid. When I eventually graduate with my Bachelor Degree, I will have spent 15 years playing the violin. I know a lot of people will have spent more. When I get my bachelor degree, I will probably have to do some further study, maybe an extra year for a post graduate diploma, which takes me to 16 years, and I will have spent 6 years in tertiary study. After that, I will probably want to spend maybe a year or two preparing myself for orchestral auditions because I know personally that I won't be ready to enter that field as soon as I complete my studies. Others might be, but I won't. So we're looking at 18 years having been playing the violin. When I eventually get a job in an orchestra (which might not be for a year or two when I eventually win an audition), I'll probably be going into a job with a salary of about 60-80k. We're looking at about 20 years of my life playing the violin (by which time I will be about 27), I will have spent 6 years in tertiary study, and then another 3 or 4 years trying to get a job (during which time I will be teaching and gigging around Perth).

Take into consideration what I would have been doing had I not been accepted into Music at uni. I would be studying a Bachelor of Internet Technology. That's right, web design and stuff like that. That's a 3 year degree, after that three year degree, I probably would've been able to find a job straight away, going straight into a 40-60k job, by which time I would've been 20 and have spent only 3 years studying and only 3 years studying this field. By the time I was 27, I would probably be looking up towards a 80-100k job, have a house and family, probably a nice car, and be on the way to the average life.

However, while I could have done that, I would much rather be doing music, because I love music. While it would be nice if I could just grab a bachelor degree and go straight into an orchestral position, I know that's not the case. I know I'm going to need to practice 3-5 hours a day, possibly more. I know that even when I get a job in an orchestra, I'm going to have to keep practicing in order to be on the look out for better positions (hopefully with more money) in order to be the bread winner.

When ever someone asks me if I think orchestral musicians should get paid more, it's a resounding yes from me. The amount of study we do at tertiary level is about on par with Medical students. Yet, you can be a Medical student so long as you have good grades, which really can come from the last two years of schooling. A lot of people will choose medicine because they have the grades to get in and it will give them money. For musicians, you need to be working for almost your whole life in order to get a job, at a pay rate that is significantly less than most other jobs.

And you know what? Despite the grim outlook that I've just painted, most of the general public that I would tell this to would be envious of the life I have ahead of me. Why? Because I get to do the thing that I love for the rest of my life. And that's what seals it for me. Despite the fact that I know that almost every waking moment from the time I end this post to sometime when I decide to retire (though probably much later) will be spent in hard work, that work doesn't seem so hard because I know that it's in order to create beautiful music, it's there in order to make the thing that I love.

To me, if you're going into music to make money, you're in the wrong direction. however, if you're going into music to do the thing that you love, nothing can stop you.

November 28, 2006 at 03:52 AM · Money is a tool. Like any tools, the more, the better. On the other hand, the more powerful the tool, the more destruction it can cause the user if not used with caution...

Life is no shortage of irony. Face it, and, ironically, enjoy it.

November 28, 2006 at 06:07 AM · Irony should be a synonym for living:)

I can't imagine anything more fun than being a 22 year old touring soloist, playing in a different far-flung corner of the globe every week or two, cultivating friendships and a following, moving the adoring masses. I can't imagine much worse than being 44 and backing them up. The alternative isn't necessarily a three year degree in smacking together websites. By getting an engineering degree at a top school, you could enter the universe of achievement soloists occupy, and then if you're still interested, be a husband to the soloist of your dreams:)

November 28, 2006 at 06:08 AM · Jim, now that's really ironic. Traveling with a tight working schedule is no fun at all. Being there, done that. Imagine that I was afford $60 a meal every day, but what I really wanted to eat was frozen Italian noodles from a supermaket cooked in plain water...I was so sick of eating out every night. All that rich restaurant food upset my stomach...

Appearance is deceiving.

November 28, 2006 at 06:29 AM · If you're talking about traveling on business, the critical difference is the adoring masses.

November 28, 2006 at 09:31 AM · Vivian,

I think that if I was doing a world tour, I would be using this website to contact violinists and have dinner with them, as opposed to eating out. I'd get a home cooked meal, they'd get to meet a touring violinist

November 28, 2006 at 09:53 AM · It happens! Except they don't contact you; you contact them. But mostly the bastards mooch off people they already know from previous world tours.

November 28, 2006 at 02:50 PM · Ilya? Anything to say about life as a soloist? :)

November 28, 2006 at 03:38 PM · Oh yea, Ilya's coming to Perth next year. You're more than welcome to have dinner at my place if you want!

November 28, 2006 at 04:35 PM · Oh yeah.... Ilya, next time you're in Canada I'll introduce you to beavertails! (assuming you're somewhere's relatively close to where I live)

"bmw does not make people happpier if they are not happy to start with. neither does music.

happiness is different from escape from reality. usually people are more content or even happy if they are on track with achieving their goals in life and of life. good marriage and having children despite all their thorns are probably the best predictor of long term happiness. careers can help if they are meaningful, not even necessarily stimulating. money and music can help, but not much:)"

Bmw's and music not making people happier unless they are happy to start with? I agree that a bmw won't, I disagree that music doesn't. I don't know how many times (too many to count) I've done a concert where people have come up to me and they've told me that they've been having a crummy day but decided to come anyways and that coming and hearing the music performed was just what they needed to give themselves a pick me up. Many of my friends (non-musicians and musicians) who find music incrediably theraputic (sp?) and who derive great enjoyment and comfort from music. Music is around you (most people anyways) from the time you are very small and it can be extremely impactful for many people. If I'm having a crummy day, I pick up my fiddle and play some Bach. It helps me to regain focus, vent my frustrations and get back to doing what needs to be done. I have students who have strong memories of hearing people in their families play violin, one student in particular had a very difficult childhood growing up but one of her most positive memories is the music and playing music helps her to strengthen those good memories. A bmw doesn't do any of that last time I checked. It just drains money from your pocket on gas mileage.

I would also disagree that music is a way of getting away from reality. It is in a sense a get away but it's very much real. It's a form of expression and a way to vent and channel emotions. Cars don't really channel emotions (unless blaring your music really loud counts).

You can't really put music and money together, in my opinion, because the two are so completely different. Music is a feeling, a way of expression. Money is a means by which you obtain things and material posession to me is not a way to find true meaning in your life and the people that surround you.

A happy life (for me) is, being content (and excited!) in what I do and with what I've got and in the relationships that I have built. It's not to say you can't change your mind about the people you like or about what type of career or family lifestyle suits you best but you have to really know yourself before any of those things can make you truly happy.

November 28, 2006 at 05:10 PM · BMW sucks.

Toyotas Rule.

November 28, 2006 at 06:08 PM · kelsey, nice post. i think one of your points has been echoed by vivian earlier in that music does much more than cars (esp bmw:)). can't argue against the the therapeutic value of music. but, if we were on a car site, there may be a different response. bmw may rule:)

even though i am not a musician, i share many sentiments in ben's post.

music and money are separate entities, but they are very much related in day to day life for a musician. how do you put a value on a job/gig over another?

a bigger issue behind money is time. although very financially well off people are not necessarily idling, they could afford to sit around or pursue something of their true interest if you want to. others will find that hard if not impossible because of financial and family obligations. money may not buy happiness, but sometimes it can buy you that freedom, that expensive luxury called time. that is my definition of being rich.

so as a musician, you have to choose,,,should i get the most buck off this gig, or should i choose another venture/venue based on my principles? is money or prestige or experience more important at this juncture? how do i strike a balance?

realism and idealism clashes. money and music are very much related. really:)

on happpiness:) :

i am happy to see the many examples cited by others on the merits of music. i will still go stubborn on this by saying that there has to be something more instrinic that makes a person happy/content. music, as an influence, can, may or may not. if music serves to elevate the mood of someone during the concert, what happens tomorrow when the serotonin neurotransmitters are degraded? another concert?:) classical musicians are a special, endearing breed in my heart, but, unfortunately, they are as immune to depression as the general population.

music may help round off the sharp edges of life and reality, but it cannot take them away.

November 28, 2006 at 06:34 PM · ...maybe vanessa mae and andre rieu really like playing their styles of music.

November 28, 2006 at 06:53 PM · Ben C, you put it well, in your longer reply up above. (Not that your shorter replies are lousy, mind you...)

November 28, 2006 at 07:10 PM · "...maybe vanessa mae and andre rieu really like playing their styles of music."

That would be great for them. What can beat the fact that you get fed well to do what you enjoy doing?

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Annapolis Bows & Violins

Laurie's Books

Discover the best of Violinist.com in these collections of editor Laurie Niles' exclusive interviews.

Violinist.com Interviews Volume 1
Violinist.com Interviews Volume 1, with introduction by Hilary Hahn

Violinist.com Interviews Volume 2
Violinist.com Interviews Volume 2, with introduction by Rachel Barton Pine

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