What do we listen to when we are NOT playing?!

November 20, 2006 at 11:30 PM · Just wondering, what Kind of music do we listen to when we are NOT playing?!

Please share your thoughts and ideas.

Replies (61)

November 20, 2006 at 11:33 PM · Whew--anything from 70s and 80s rock to ancient Scottish and Appalachian dissonant harmonies, to I'm a fan of Vivaldi concerti, to 40's Swing, to Paganini for immersion, to Beethoven symphonies for further appreciatioin and discernment in his evolution, to I like Dave Sandborn, to Al Green.

Couldn't answer this decisively if I had to.

November 21, 2006 at 04:25 AM · I mostly listen to violin--hoping to brand the SOUND in my brain. When my brain gets too hot from the branding, I listen to NPR to cool off. :D

November 21, 2006 at 04:34 AM · Vivian, any relation to violinmakers?

sound sensitive......

November 21, 2006 at 10:54 AM · Music I listen to-

favorites are Italian baroque and English string music; period instrument recordings like Andrew Manze or Rachel Podger; also usually listen to recordings of whatever orchestra works are on the next concert; lots of NPR; sometimes oldies or old-time fiddle; almost anything, except I truly dislike bebop jazz, new age-y stuff and rap.

November 21, 2006 at 01:46 PM · I make sure to listen every day, whether I practice or not. Some classical of a great variety, and always a little Cajun, the fiddle genre that fascinates me most. Can't get the French accent right otherwise, and keeps the tunes in my head. Sue

November 21, 2006 at 03:10 PM · When I am not listening to classical? Evanescence and Nickleback

November 21, 2006 at 03:39 PM · Liszt, the Beatles, gypsy bands, Bartok, Brahms, Boris Grebenshchikov, old recordings of Bach S&P, Takacs Quartet, Chopin, and whatever's on the radio. :)

November 21, 2006 at 04:37 PM · I'm a big fan of Andrew Bird, Camille, and '80's pop music.

November 21, 2006 at 04:48 PM · I love jazz and oldies, but I mostly listen to classical of one sort or another.

November 21, 2006 at 05:05 PM · Oistrakh, Szeryng, Classical munsical in general, and opera, with some musical theatre thrown in(as if opera isn't musical theatre.

November 21, 2006 at 05:24 PM · Gangsta Rap and Bing Crosby, though they're essentially the same.

November 21, 2006 at 06:36 PM · Hi Gennady,

Although I am not seeking a particular maker's "sound", it appears that I've got more Strad on the recordings than anything one else if the violin played was specified. Among famous violin makers from the past, Strad was certainly very productive.

I have a recording, which collected in one CD violins made by seven famous makers from Amati (1640) to Horvath (1992), which I listened to time and again. However, Rabin's 6 CD collection 1936-1975 is a regular in the trays of my CD player.

November 21, 2006 at 07:19 PM · Mostly folk and fiddle. We played for a St. Andrews night dinner for the scottish society so it's been mostly Alasdair Fraser lately. But I also like cowboy folk... and Vivaldi. Wide range. :)

K.

November 21, 2006 at 07:38 PM · I'm listening to the new Muse album, some Kanye West, the leaks of Nas's new album (the beats are dissapointing) and listening to live bootlegs of the latest incarnation Guns N' Roses tour.

November 21, 2006 at 07:46 PM · I listen to Guns N' Roses (the REAL lineup, not this new crap), classic rock (Zeppelin etc.), Zappa, the Chili Peppers.

November 21, 2006 at 08:11 PM · Almost no recorded music really. However I have located blues jams for every night of the week except Tuesday. I couldn't tell you Nas from Muse. Don't know my actors and actresses either.

November 22, 2006 at 02:03 AM · Sue Belcher--hook us up with some Cajun Fiddler links!.

November 22, 2006 at 04:44 AM · I like led zepplin, bob dylan, beatles, santana, hendrix, some clapton, the police, and a few other older bands. For more recent bands I like chili peppers, sublime, dispatch, some dmb, and some stuff i hear on the radio. For rap I like wu-tang, talib qweli, big L, gangstarr, mos def and some of the more commercial rappers less commercial stuff. At least this is what comes to mind.

I also like music from india and the middle east (their "classical" music).

Mostly I listen to western classical though.

November 22, 2006 at 05:26 AM · Brian,

BigL and ganstarr... you have taste.

November 22, 2006 at 10:47 AM · On another, more dreadful note, i might tell you what i was NOT listening for today.

I was very ashamed of being a human today, when i found out that one of my close friends (and ex-neighbours) was raped nearly to death at birth by her own father. Her mother and her had to suffer this for several years before the DPJ (youth protection govt. agency) took role. Now this man is roaming free in the northern Montréal area (i've said hello to him several times) and people ask me why the f¤ck i don't want to have kids??!??!??!?

If you want me to drop a name, i won't.... but i might mention.... k + alinowski (he's polish) ... now if you'll excuse me, i'll just go bury my head in the sand for a coupe of years. On account of being of the same species as this individual (and billions of others of his kind. Billions, i sh*t you not. A billion is a "one" followed by NINE zeroes.)

November 22, 2006 at 11:02 AM · Right now "The Awakening" by Shubha Mudgal. Listened to tribute to NFAK yesterday. Mostly lots of old indian songs by various singers (lata m, asha bh, saigal, whatever) and newer by AR Rahman, Jagjit Singh, indian classical like Brian too. Theres a whole world out there...

The BBC Radio 3, and Clasicos Populares between 3 and 4 on Radio Nacional España- Radio Clasica, esp on Thursdays.

Lots of the bands mentioned before as this four member family will sometimes have 4 different music playing in each room....

November 22, 2006 at 03:59 PM · Britney and Broadway :)

November 22, 2006 at 10:15 PM · I listen to classical music, BBC World Service News (online), NPR's Morning Edition, Fresh Air, and Talk of the Nation (especially Science Friday- Science for lay people like me).

When I listen to music, I cannot do anything else. I am not capable of multi-tasking.

November 25, 2006 at 02:54 PM · Hmm, a bit embarassing really, but what do I want to share?

I mainly listen to North African, Middle Eastern or Turkish music, and am especially fond of the Saaidi and Aksak rhythms (mainly because having danced to them, I now understand them). There is a lot of really nice fiddle music from countries like Algeria and Morocco. Although they don't have expensive instruments, there is a springyness in the left hand that sounds very lively and joyful, and anyway I really like the sound of spike fiddles. Egyptian music is really soulful, not rushed, and players can just come in when they feel like it, Inshallah. One famous song by Warda, Batwans Beek, has a three minute instrumental intro, before she starts singing "I cherish you" for the next twelve minutes (but with plenty of instrumental breaks for the violin, saxophone and of course the drums - they are Africans).

Reggae music is really good to listen to in winter and spring, just to remind us that summer is coming - eventually.

I'm really envious of people who have beautifully catalogued CD collections because mine is more of a 'lucky dip'.

November 26, 2006 at 03:37 PM · Classical stuff, mostly - the Romantics. But interspersed with Celtic and Big Band. And I love all the Cirque du Soleil CDs.

PS: Eric - jeez, that's about as dark as it gets. Your poor friend and her mother...

November 26, 2006 at 03:50 PM · >I mainly listen to North African, Middle Eastern or Turkish music, and am especially fond of the Saaidi and Aksak rhythms (mainly because having danced to them, I now understand them). There is a lot of really nice fiddle music from countries like Algeria and Morocco. Although they don't have expensive instruments, there is a springyness in the left hand that sounds very lively and joyful, and anyway I really like the sound of spike fiddles. Egyptian music is really soulful, not rushed, and players can just come in when they feel like it, Inshallah. One famous song by Warda, Batwans Beek, has a three minute instrumental intro, before she starts singing "I cherish you" for the next twelve minutes (but with plenty of instrumental breaks for the violin, saxophone and of course the drums - they are Africans).

Ooh, I like African, too, but most of my collection is West and Central Africa. Any suggestions on what has a lot of violin? (Drums, ah, the drums. That's why I LOVE African music.) I've got a CD from a friend called "Mozart A'Egyptienne" - have you ever heard this? It's a kick - they blend Mozart with local music and use all local instruments. It's wild. (My friend who bought the CD is Moroccan but is now a Belgian citizen who lives in Paris, so who knows where she found it?!)

Alison, would love your suggestions on some good CDs or artists to look out for!

November 26, 2006 at 03:51 PM · I love Turkish, Central Asian and Azerbaijani music....there is this fantastic Azeri traditional singer named Alim Qasimov who I was lucky enough to hear live in concert in Chicago a few weeks ago....amazing!!!

As for violin-like stuff, the Azeris have a neat little instrument called the kemancheh, it's sort of an erhu-violin hybrid, held vertically like a tiny cello. Don't really know how best to describe it, but it makes a wonderful sound.

November 26, 2006 at 04:24 PM · I love listening to a variety of music, but the usual winners for me are Haydn String Quartets, anything sung by Fritz Wunderlich, Giuseppe De Stefano, Bryn Terfel, Elly Ameling, Dawn Upshaw, or Teresa Berganza, Brahms Piano Quartets, Bach Keyboard Partitas, Toccatas, Motets, St. Matthew Passion, and Cantatas performed by Joshua Rifkin's ensemble. I also really like listening to the Comedian Harmonists, Richter playing just about anything, especially Schubert, Schumann, and Beethoven. I also really like Johann Friedrich Fasch. And then there's violin music . . .

Elaine

November 26, 2006 at 05:27 PM · "what do you listen to when you're not playing"

The voices in my head saying "practice.....practice!" ;)

Right now, Jack Johnson, Bjork, Bruce Cockburn and Jewel, Coldplay and Jars of Clay seem to what are in high rotation in my cd player.

November 26, 2006 at 05:48 PM · other than classical? =P lots of jazz (old and new school) and genres that merge together, r&b and jazz, classical and jazz, indian and classical... oh chinese and japanese music too, I play the erhu aswell :)

November 27, 2006 at 12:32 AM · these days a lot of classic blues (john lee hooker and acoustic muddy waters especially). i'm following the joey jihad vs. reed dollaz mixtape battles (underground hiphop, unsigned hype).

November 27, 2006 at 08:13 PM · Hi Terez, there is so much wonderful music in North Africa - you are really lucky to be starting on this journey. The very safest option to begin with is Rough Guide to North Africa, but specially recommended are Najat Aatabou, Chalf Hassan, (for violin and drum) and also Cheb Mami, and Khaled for Algerian Rai (Cheb means boy, but Cheb Khaled has been a boy for about 30 years!).

If you want lush orchestration with ney (and of course drums) then check out the gorgeous Gamil Gamal by Bashir Abdel 'Aal - total meltdown. And if you like Bashir Abdel 'Aal (ney), he also made a brilliant album with Hossam Ramzy, Source of Fire - so good I wore it out and had a buy another copy.

One of the best places to buy North African music is France because of their migrant population. One large music store (FNAC, apparently they are online) don't just have a World Music or Africa section, they do every single country.

If you discover any really good North Africa music I want to hear about it too!

November 29, 2006 at 09:22 PM · Ben Folds is fantastic, also John Mayer, DMB, Meyey/O'Connor stuff, just to name a few favorites. Also love the Moulin Rouge soundtrack.

November 30, 2006 at 04:38 PM · In this moment a lot of Perlman and Joshua Bell, near their concerts, I really enjoy Karen Carpenter voice too.

December 12, 2006 at 04:50 PM · As Louis Armstrong is said to have said:

"There are two types of music: Good music and bad music."

To me, good music is music that was performed well, and free of ceaseless scratching/screaming.

I keep my car radio tuned to Superhits of the 60s and 70s.

My CD collection is mostly soundtrack/Christian music.

The CDs I borrow the most are Mannheim Steamroller (I love the way he turns the orchestra electric!)

The CDs I get from the library are usually classical, musical, and novelty. I look mostly for comedic music, even when looking at classical music.

My radio at work is a wide variety of everything that I like...as I am browsing through it right now, the first random five artists that show up are Hans Zimmer, Dierks Bentley, Trisha Yearwood, Frank Sinatra, and Emerson Drive...so yeah, I listen to all kinds of music.

December 12, 2006 at 09:33 PM · Andrew Bird, Modest Mouse, David Bowie, Adam Green, the Violent Femmes, Ben Folds, At the Drive-in, Tom Waits, Jeff Buckley, the Arcade Fire, etc....

December 12, 2006 at 09:49 PM · My listening choices are Balkan Kolo and Dermes from the Primorje region of Dalmatia. I also like the Tammburica music of Eastern Slavonija.

December 12, 2006 at 10:53 PM · Ted, I like Bulgarian music (along with the obvious Hungarian/Transylvanian), is that close? :)

December 13, 2006 at 05:36 PM · I have several compiled cd's that my friends gave me. I could hardly say what's on them. I like music from Cowboy Beebop, jazz (Dave Grusin, Stan Getz, Bob Brookmeyer), random techno, Gorillaz, Counting Crows, Led Zeppelin, Coldplay, U2, Radiohead, bluegrass, Cake, Deathcab for Cutie... I think that's the main chunk of cd's sitting in my car right now.

December 13, 2006 at 09:19 PM · The Ark, Sex Pistols, Steeleye span, Dolly Parton,Armenian folk music, Fanfare Ciocarlia; a bunch of recordings of the Bach Sonatas and Partitas, like Schröder, Milstein, van Dael (favorite), Menuhin. Also a fan of Händel-operas, like Acis & Galathea. Verdi´s operachoirs,some Purcell, some Marin Marais, well...eh, quite like...everything you could think of kinda music ;)

Byebye/

Jenny

December 14, 2006 at 02:41 PM · Billy Joël ,Elton John ,Ferrier Kathleen (great singer), pianists Nelson Freire, Martha Argerich, and TANGO MUSIC FROM ARGENTINA !!!

Marc

December 15, 2006 at 05:57 AM · Mainly: Huberman, Milstein, Szigeti, Ysaye, Heifetz, Kreisler and Joachim.

A lot of other music too, but I tried writing it all out but stopped because it was taking too long.

I think Huberman has been underated in the history books. Carl Flesch sort of had the last word on him and it stuck.

December 15, 2006 at 07:31 PM · I'm playing for hours a day and the last thing I really want to listen to is more music when I finally have some spare time. That being said, I'll listen to Classical music when I'm on vacation and not practicing. I'll also listen to pieces for interpretation and ideas, but when I'm not doing that, I'm usually listening to the news!

Daniel

December 15, 2006 at 07:53 PM · Techno, house, trance, and some hip-hop. Of course classical pieces I'm working on. No country though!

Brian

December 15, 2006 at 08:27 PM · Mostly violin music and spiritual songs like CDs from West Coast Baptist College and North Valley Baptist Church. For violin music I like Vivaldi, Bach and Paganini and the warhorse concertos, Mendelssohn, Beethoven, Tchaikovsky. Michael Rabin's 6 CD collection, anything by Milstein, Grumiaux, Szeryng and Perlman.

December 16, 2006 at 08:06 PM · >Hi Terez, there is so much wonderful music in North Africa - you are really lucky to be starting on this journey. The very safest option to begin with is Rough Guide to North Africa, but specially recommended are Najat Aatabou, Chalf Hassan, (for violin and drum) and also Cheb Mami, and Khaled for Algerian Rai (Cheb means boy, but Cheb Khaled has been a boy for about 30 years!).

If you want lush orchestration with ney (and of course drums) then check out the gorgeous Gamil Gamal by Bashir Abdel 'Aal - total meltdown. And if you like Bashir Abdel 'Aal (ney), he also made a brilliant album with Hossam Ramzy, Source of Fire - so good I wore it out and had a buy another copy.

Alison - a belated thanks for your suggestions. I just LOVE Khaled - only have one CD of his, but maybe I'll get more. He seemed so wonderfully original and lively w/o sounding too pop. I have some Cheb Mami, I'm now realizing - he's collaborated with Sting quite a bit, hasn't he? They're together on a CD I've got called "Desert Roses and Arabian Rhythms" that's good.

Will check out your suggestions...

December 17, 2006 at 09:08 PM · shostakovich (if you know me, duh)

December 17, 2006 at 09:48 PM · Also, when we're not playing either, it's mostly Bluegrass around here.

January 23, 2007 at 06:15 AM · My range of tastes is so broad it's just easier to mention what I don't like. I try, lol note the word TRY, to stay away from anything that appears in the main stream media. Unfortunately however some of those tunes are just so damn catchy. Although every so often rap or hip-hop will come on and I won't be annoyed by it, I don't listen to it and I don't own anything from either of those genres. Country music, unless it's bluegrass, or something of that type I don't listen to either. However, one genre that I can say without I love without a doubt, is metal and avant-garde. Something that really slams into me hard and cold like a knife, hits me in the gut and vibrates through my skull. Maybe one day, once I get the violin down I'll take up the cello too, try out some Iron Maiden on that thing......yeah that'd be sweet.

January 23, 2007 at 07:30 AM · OMG I just found out the weirdest of all things. Melora Creager from Rasputina is 40 years old, that's almost as old as my mom. Not of course that, that means anything and I'm not being condescending either, but she doesn't look 40.

January 23, 2007 at 07:14 AM · Hey, I know someone that played with them! They, umm, did not get along. To put it lightly. Hehehehe

January 23, 2007 at 08:06 AM · Age rules!

Everybody should listen to weenie juke radio sometime.

January 23, 2007 at 09:36 PM · My last ten played pieces:

Ravel: 'La Valse'

Ravel: 'La Valse'

Ravel (transcription for piano): 'La Valse'

Ravel: 'La Valse'

Dvorak: Cello Concerto

Ravel: 'La Valse'

Rachmaninoff: Rhapsody on a Theme of Paganini

Ravel: 'La Valse'

Ravel: 'La Valse'

Rachmaninoff: Piano Concerto No. 3

Notice a pattern? =)

January 26, 2007 at 01:26 AM · indie and electro stuff.

good tucker.

January 27, 2007 at 06:37 AM · Bob Dylan,Steve Earle,David Byrne.

Check out the strings on "The Gringo's Tale" (Earle)

January 27, 2007 at 11:05 AM · "I'm the operator of my pocket calculator."

January 27, 2007 at 04:00 PM · Anyone here into David Bromberg? His music is a perfect fusion of many different genres, such as blues, jazz, folk, and even country. He's one of my favorite musicians of all time.

He owns a violin shop now, and is supposedly the world's number one collector of American violins.

January 27, 2007 at 04:54 PM · Amanda,

I notice that you have studied with Elena Hirsu.

Where is she now and what is she doing?

January 27, 2007 at 05:59 PM · I really enjoy listening to Loreena McKennitt, her instrumentation and vocal arrangements constantly interest me, no matter how many times I listen to her. I also enjoy listening to Irish pub music. I also like folk music, musical theater numbers, and WELL written and PERFORMED pop music- be it rock, alt, hip hop, etc. (in my opinion there's not much of this out there anymore). I shudder at the thought of the continuous crop of prepackaged "singers" who are rich and famous simply because they're not 100% tone deaf and are beautiful enough to be shoved in our face. (Paris Hilton, anyone?) That's a sore spot for me... I figure that performing quality live music is my way of "stickin to the man" so that helps me calm down.:)

Other than that I try to listen to my current repertoire when I'm not performing so I can get in my mental "practice" as much as possible.

Laura Russ

January 31, 2007 at 07:01 AM · Loreena Mckennitt is a fantastic musician, I was so happy to hear she had a new cd out as she's been away from it for such a long time. She supposed to appear on some program on PBS, but they haven't mentioned what date the showing times in my area are.

January 31, 2007 at 11:21 AM · David Bromberg, interesting to hear that name. Last time I heard him play was in his apartment above his shop. Lined with those American fiddles! I rather like American rustic work myself. Probably because that's what I do.

In the shop we listen to everything from NPR through junk classical, reggae, metal, classic rock, bluegrass. In CDs, about half of what I listen to is oddball stuff left by visiting musicians. My favorite CDs are by Aubrey Haynie and Roscoe Morgan, both folks who gave me their CDs. "Aunt Bertie's Wingback Chevrolet" is probably my favorite of the last few years. Roscoe's ears are probably burning. I think that was a vanity CD, but the tune has been covered a bunch.

In "classical" I really like the Cannon demo CD and Glenn Gould Goldberg Variations.

But mainly I'm listening to the speakers. Steve Murphy, who works with us, makes speakers. The ones at work are cardboard tubes, 2 on each side, stuffed with fiberglass, each with a 3" speaker. On top, a small cheap tweeter beaming into an acoustic lens that disperses the highs. These things are so transparent I can hardly hear the speakers. So I'm paying attention to them and learning to hear the speakers better.

My Bose at home sound like junk in comparison. but we've got a new center speaker as of last night. A 6" mid in a piece of PVC with a lens reflected tweeter on top. Very big improvement.

The real home speakers I'll want to listen to. Huge line arrays. I think each side has 10 tweeters and 8 midrange. They're under construction. Will match the small refrigerator sized folded horn subwoofer!

So the music isn't as interesting as the reproduction equipment these days!

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