Japenese Orchestras

November 12, 2006 at 06:13 AM · Does anyone know what language Japanese orchestras rehearse in?

Replies (9)

November 12, 2006 at 06:24 AM · The youth orchestra my daughter was in did everything in Japanese, naturally.

Seems a rather strange question.

November 12, 2006 at 07:14 AM · Japanese orchestras rehearse in Armenian because that is their national language.

November 12, 2006 at 07:22 AM · The reason I asked is because someone once told me that (in a professional orchestra) if a conductor isn't Japanese, musicians in Japan also speak a certain amount of German. Someone else recently told me a similar thing about orchestras in Korea and I was just wondering if anyone had any experience of a Japanese orchestra doing this?

GN

November 12, 2006 at 09:36 AM · Greetings,

never heard that. Its all Japanese as far as I am aware. There would simply be too many misunderstandings in any other langugae. Foreign language learning in Japan has not been a success.

Another poin to bear in mind that is for historical and I suspect economic reasons, the Japanese are rather resistant to learning foreign language in geenral at a somewhat unconscious level. I speak as someone who has taught at both University and adult education level here.

When I am cocnert master of Japanese orchestras the conducter may often takes the trouble to translate what he has said into English, if he has worked abroad which many have. Some -very- fine conducters over here,

Cheers,

Buri

November 12, 2006 at 11:20 AM · What about for guest conductors? IN Perth we almost always have a large number of French and German and Russian conductors coming in during the year... I'm guessing that they rehearse in English here, but what about in Japan? Yes, you'd need to learn japanese to get along in the society, but would guest conductors be needing to know japanese to a high level to work there?

November 12, 2006 at 05:25 PM · The material my teacher, a Japanese, gave me was in Japanese. In our conversation when we first started, she mentioned that they used German to read A, B, C (for music) when I complained that I didn't know any English and was forced to use solegie (spelling?) to learn music. My teacher started learning the violin/viola at the age of 5 or so. So that must be some 25 years ago in Japan.

November 12, 2006 at 05:28 PM · A friend of mine has conducted in Japan. He told me that the rehearsals were in Japanese and that he was assisted by a translator.

November 12, 2006 at 08:29 PM · Greetings,

yes, thta would be the way. I think where the confusion is arising is the solfeggio thing. Japan imported quite a lot of western cultural artefacts from Germany during the Meiji period. Thus fixed doh solfeg is taught in most scool usic lessons to a small extent. It is mostly based around German but the pronubciation has got very skewed.

Cheers,

Buri

November 12, 2006 at 10:12 PM · Ah, well that makes perfect sense.

THanks all for your replys

GN

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