September 2008

Feeling like more of an intermediate to advanced beginner now.

September 9, 2008 04:08

I felt it time for an update.
I have a new, real, violin. Its a bit like learning all over again.
2008 is the year of vibrato - thankfully its still 2008, gives me a bit of time to get a bit better. Every time I play I still have to polish those bloody strings, I still have lessons where that's all I do. I'm over being scared or frustrated by it now though - its more there than it was, I have to believe it will continue to e so. Its my thumb now, I think - amazing how it tightens up.
I'm having a lesson every 2-3 weeks but it goes on for a couple of hours typically. I have been going through Handel sonatas - now D major. Previously A major. I love these. There's always something more that I want to do.
As opposed to Thais Meditation, which I have also started. I don't like listenting to this piece, much less playing it. Never the less, it was this piece that I have recorded myself, to get an early marker of the new violin and what I can do with it. Youtube was pathetically slow in accepting the upload, so I have a link here to my photobucket site if anyone is interested:

As usual, all comments will be appreciated.
Don't watch the last couple of seconds if you are offended by swearing.

We are due for another nervous players' recital evening shortly - looking forward to taking my practise with potato chips and knee bends that step fruther, and will report bacvk on their relative merits for dealing with the rush of adrenalin that upsets the begining playing.

As to the new violin - all up has cost me about AUS$400.00, which isn't a lot (about US$250.00) but I'm pleasantly surprised. It a small 4/4 (352mm) but a bit heavy. Made by a chap in Lingenthal in 1987. One of our occasional posters Jasmine has luthiered it for me - it arrived with a bit of oddly cut dowel lying in its belly, an overly long tailgut, a popped seam, a rather high nut and a home made bridge. She did a great job, reshaped the bridge, new soundpost, etc. It was already strung with eudoxa's so I'm keeping them on for a bit. I like them, and its good to practise tuning. I'm curious as to its story - I assume it has been specifically made to be this size, it has a lovely little neck and scroll. But has it ever been played? Or did someone new buy it and decide to use it for soundpost and bridge shaping practise, then lose interest or die or something - what led it to arrive in a shop in the state it was in?
I'm back with my kun SR, and I think I fel more comfortable than I did with the 3/4. It sort of rests on me, and I am actually starting to feel some head freedom, although with some TMJ spasm on the right.
I'm pleased that it doesn't hurt to use my left hand, which was why I moved from a 4/4 in the first place.
I am determined to upload a video of me getting through a whole piece from memory. I'll try to rmember to do it tomorrow. Ha Ha.

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