Printer-friendly version
Karen Allendoerfer

Cold Courante

August 12, 2008 at 11:34 AM

I received a time for my audition for the LSO: August 27th at 7 p.m. This is a Wednesday night, after which I will have worked a full day at my office/lab job. And, even more exciting, it is the day after my daughter's 9th birthday party (not an extravaganza, just some girls going to an art studio, but still).

It was nonetheless still feeling too remote for me to really be able to motivate and focus. I was feeling like the Bach and the Clarke were "done." Or as done as I could get them at my current level, back to the plateau of okayness.

Several blogs ago, Pauline suggested that I view this audition, my first in >12 years, as practicing for how to take an audition. So, to simulate that really authentic sense of terror and brain freeze that has heretofore characterized my audition experiences, I decided to walk into the rec room and play the Bach and Clarke as if I had arrived at a strange place on the T after a full day of work. And record it, knowing in the back of my mind, that I would, would indeed, really post it.

This is the Bach:

The Clarke is still too dreadful to post. My old one is still up, with the video going twice as fast as the sound, and it's funny to watch. But for some reason it cuts off before it gets to the truly appalling part in 7th position. What the YouTube gods taketh away, they also giveth:

After posting the Bach, I was directed towards all sorts of other, better, recordings of the same piece. Besides being reminded again that I need some real recording equipment other than an Olympus waterproof digital camera, I was also struck by the number of players who used rubato. My teacher, and Mendy on this site, have both pointed out to me that the Bach suites are not appropriately played with rubato, so I've been keeping it to a minimum, if not out altogether. I'm used to that interpretation now, but I wonder occasionally if that lack of rubato in my case makes it sound a little mechanical.

For the Clarke, Drew's stratosphere blog came at a good time.

Any other suggestions or comments welcome, including how to combat brain freeze!!


From Yixi Zhang
Posted on August 13, 2008 at 5:02 AM
Brava! Karen, thank you for posting the videos! I enjoyed watching them so much that I watched them twice in a row! Some day I will invest a video camera and post mine too. Some day.
From Karen Allendoerfer
Posted on August 13, 2008 at 10:25 AM
Thanks Yixi! I have my lesson today, and recording the Clarke has really helped me focus on a couple of passages.

This entry has been archived and is no longer accepting comments.

Facebook Twitter YouTube Instagram Email

Violinist.com is made possible by...

Shar Music
Shar Music

Pirastro Strings
Pirastro Strings

Corilon Violins
Corilon Violins

International Violin Competition of Indianapolis
International Violin Competition of Indianapolis

Los Angeles Philharmonic
Los Angeles Philharmonic

Dimitri Musafia, Master Maker of Violin and Viola Cases
Dimitri Musafia, Master Maker of Violin and Viola Cases

Violinist.com Shopping Guide
Violinist.com Shopping Guide

ARIA International Summer Academy

Metzler Violin Shop

Bein & Company

Bay Fine Strings Violin Shop

Leatherwood Bespoke Rosin

Annapolis Bows & Violins

Los Angeles Violin Shop

String Masters

Bobelock Cases

Things 4 Strings LLC

Violin-Strings.com

Viola-Strings.com

Baerenreiter

Fiddlerman.com

FiddlerShop

Sleepy Puppy Press

Jargar Strings

J.R. Judd Violins, LLC

Southwest Strings

Nazareth Gevorkian Violins

Laurie's Books

Discover the best of Violinist.com in these collections of editor Laurie Niles' exclusive interviews.

Violinist.com Interviews Volume 1
Violinist.com Interviews Volume 1, with introduction by Hilary Hahn

Violinist.com Interviews Volume 2
Violinist.com Interviews Volume 2, with introduction by Rachel Barton Pine

Subscribe