Canada Council Announces 2018 Instrument Bank Recipients of Violins and Cellos

September 26, 2018, 4:13 PM · On Wednesday the Canada Council for the Arts announced 18 violinists and five cellists who will each receive a three-year loan of a fine instrument from the Council's Musical Instrument Bank. Congratulations to all!

2018 Canada Instrument Bank recipients

The 2018 recipients include:

VIOLIN

CELLO

Every three years, Canadian professional classical musicians can compete for a chance to borrow one of the 20 fine instruments from the Canada Council’s Musical Instrument Bank (MIB), which was established in 1985. The instruments include violins, cellos and bows -- collectively valued at more than $50 million. Eligible musicians must first submit a written application and recording, then finalists come to Toronto for live auditions and interviews. Applicants may receive a maximum of three Musical Instrument Bank loans of three years each. Past recipients include Lara St, John, James Ehnes, Judy Kang, Martin Beaver, and more. For more information about applying, click here.

Replies

September 26, 2018 at 11:40 PM · Great to see that all of Emily Kruspe's practice has paid off!

No offense intended -- this is still one of the best videos on YouTube. I'm sure she is well deserving of the instrument loan.

September 27, 2018 at 04:22 PM · How do they decide who gets what instrument? Also do all violinists have such white teeth?

September 27, 2018 at 04:42 PM · Eligible musicians must first submit a written application and recording, then finalists come to Toronto for live auditions and interviews. Applicants may receive a maximum of three Musical Instrument Bank loans of three years each.

Beautiful smiles all around, it is true. :)

September 28, 2018 at 01:40 AM · Laurie, I think Paul Deck was asking a slightly different question, because it is the same question I have: How is it decided which specific instrument goes to a qualified recipient. For instance, once qualified, can the recipient play some of the violins and pick one they like the best, or perhaps it is a random drawing among the recipients? Any light you can shed on that process will be greatly appreciated.

September 28, 2018 at 04:59 PM · Yes, Annabel, that's what I was asking.

September 28, 2018 at 06:10 PM · They didn't really say but I'll see if they have any more details on that.

September 28, 2018 at 07:17 PM · Okay here is an answer, from Mireille Allaire, a spokeswoman for the Instrument Bank:

"When choosing the winners, the jury assigns a priority ranking for instrument selection. This is the order that they get to pick the instruments in. The jury does not select instruments for the winners, nor can the finalists make any requests for certain instruments ahead of their turn."

September 29, 2018 at 06:29 PM · Here's a good article about the whole process:

In Search Of A Musical Instrument That Won't Break The Bank

October 1, 2018 at 04:00 PM · I wonder if your count goes up when you are offered a chance to pick, or when you actually sign on the dotted line and take one home. Maybe everyone who wins a chance always takes an instrument, even if not perhaps perfectly suited to them...

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