James Plattes

Quick Overview of the Suzuki Violin Method

November 22, 2010 19:08

I have designed and posted a website dedicated to giving prospective students and parents a quick overview of the Suzuki violin method.  In this site, I have compared and contrasted traditional violin teaching methods with the Suzuki method.  It's a five minute read and it can give parents a resource to quickly learn some of what's involved in the Suzuki method.  The address is:

http://www.suzukichild.com

It is my hope that this can be a valuable resource to parents of young violinists, and parents considering violin lessons for their child.  Hopefully this site presents an unbiased overview of these two violin learning approaches.   While searching the web, I found that it's hard to find this kind of concise information about the Suzuki violin method.

[EDIT] 
 

Archive link


Bow technique for the adult beginner

November 22, 2010 18:25

I have taught many adult beginners througout my teaching career.  I am interested in finding out how other teachers have approached teaching these players to obtain a fluid, smooth bow technique.  Also, have any teachers had success in teaching these players to have a good vibrato?  Any suggestions?

Realize that there are 17 "hinges" in the hand, wrist, elbow and shoulder that move as a professional player moves the bow.  That's an amazing concept.  Any inflexability in these "hinges" will lead to a crushed tune.  This is a difficult instrument to play well!

2 replies | Archive link


What is the ultimate goal as far as taking violin lessons?

November 10, 2010 14:00

I will sometimes ask the student, "what's the ultimate goal of your violin study?"  I want them to think about this very important question.  I believe that the ultimate goal of taking lessons is to get to the point where you will be able to teach yourself.  Teach yourself to learn or improve a technique, or learn a particular piece.  Teach yourself to be self critical, and analyze how you play and sound.  It's a good aiming point, in my opinion.  To get to this point you first need a sound technique and years of study.  You need good teachers and a wealth of performance experience. 

this is only my opinion.  This can be mentioned to a highly motivated student, that really enjoys playing the instrument.  It's good to have  an ultimate goal.  This goal takes years of study to achieve.  When and if this point is reached depends upon the dreams and goals of the student.  I just want to put this out there as a start to a discussion of the ultimate motivation and goals of our students.  Music is a vitally important part of our lives.  I enjoy sharing my sense of the importance of this art with students and parents.  This art makes for well rounded individuals. 

5 replies | Archive link


Previous entries: August 2010

Facebook Twitter YouTube Instagram Email

Violinist.com is made possible by...

Shar Music
Shar Music

Pirastro Strings
Pirastro Strings

Corilon Violins
Corilon Violins

International Violin Competition of Indianapolis
International Violin Competition of Indianapolis

Interlochen Center for the Arts
Interlochen Center for the Arts

Virtual Sejong Music Competition
Virtual Sejong Music Competition

Dimitri Musafia, Master Maker of Violin and Viola Cases
Dimitri Musafia, Master Maker of Violin and Viola Cases

Violinist.com Shopping Guide
Violinist.com Shopping Guide

Metzler Violin Shop

Bein & Company

Bay Fine Strings Violin Shop

Leatherwood Bespoke Rosin

Annapolis Bows & Violins

Los Angeles Violin Shop

String Masters

Bobelock Cases

Things 4 Strings LLC

Violin-Strings.com

Viola-Strings.com

Baerenreiter

Fiddlerman.com

FiddlerShop

Sleepy Puppy Press

Jargar Strings

J.R. Judd Violins, LLC

Southwest Strings

Nazareth Gevorkian Violins

Laurie's Books

Discover the best of Violinist.com in these collections of editor Laurie Niles' exclusive interviews.

Violinist.com Interviews Volume 1
Violinist.com Interviews Volume 1, with introduction by Hilary Hahn

Violinist.com Interviews Volume 2
Violinist.com Interviews Volume 2, with introduction by Rachel Barton Pine

Subscribe