September 2012

Viva la Eine kleine!

September 9, 2012 11:39

When I was asked to perform string quartets with fellow students at the Penrod Arts Fair, I was quite excited at the opportunity. Touted as "Indiana's Nicest Day," the Arts Fair is a one-day event held on the grounds of the Indianapolis Museum of Art (IMA). According to its website, the Penrod Arts Fair “showcases hundreds of artists, and offers live music, performing arts and local cuisine. Proceeds from this one-day celebration provide grants for Indianapolis-area arts and community organizations.” Sounds good to me! Performing on one of the several stages at this fair would allow the quartet to play for hundreds (thousands?) of people; Penrod’s website states that over 20,000 patrons attend the fair each year. With grand visions of promoting the cause of classical music going through my head, I eagerly loaded up the bus with my peers and headed off to the IMA.

Alas, it became clear upon arrival that the administration who set the quartet up with this opportunity had perhaps not done an entirely thorough job. We were not scheduled to perform on any one of the various stages and were in fact not on the program at all. In spite of this setback the quartet determined to perform anyway. Meandering along the rows of little white booths (containing glass work, oil paintings, world rhythm demonstrations, and belly dancing to name a few), we searched for a location where the bleed-through from those lucky, amplified performers on the stages would not interfere too much with our acoustic offering. Eventually we found a clearing in front of some trees near the path and set up in this natural foyer. As I was filling in for a violinist in this ensemble we did not have much preparation time and relied on arrangements for the most part; Bach, Handel, Debussy, Joplin, MacDowell, and others featured in these versions. There was one piece however, that required neither arranging nor much rehearsal due to its near ubiquity- Mozart’s Eine kleine Nachtmusik.

I have to admit I was reluctant to perform the Mozart. I’m not sure about my fellow quartet members, but I find it to be so overplayed that it verges on the point of cheesiness in my mind. However, by that point we had played through most of the pieces we had prepared and were trying to avoid being repetitious as there were a few dedicated audience members listening to us amongst the more mobile crowd. Out came Eine kleine. It was with a cynical smirk that I began the famous ascending motif and my scorn remained as violins, viola, and cello descended from the D. As I accompanied the first violin’s melody in the next phrase, I sneaked some peeks at our audience. To my surprise, we actually had quite a crowd building. And, what had seemed an unfocused audience during some of our other pieces was now decidedly rapt. When the violins share a melody in thirds, I tried to make it sound as beautiful as I could instead of worrying about how corny it might be. The audience’s appreciation of the music was infectious and I soon set aside my initial scoffing attitude. By the time we reached the transition section I was fully involved with the music-making and trying to make an engaging performance for the audience. When we finished the movement we received a very warm response and several people came up after to voice their sincere gratitude for the performance. After a somewhat chaotic start to the day this was a welcome reception.

So maybe “pops”-ish music is not my choice listening or playing material, but after this weekend’s performance I am not nearly as dismissive of it as before. The accessibility of such pieces as Eine kleine Nachtmusik is clearly enjoyable for audiences (it was for me as a performer, too) and I will keep that in mind for future programming. I’m not planning on giving a “Greatest Hits” recital or anything, but I will try to include an easily-approachable piece of music and figure out ways to make something that might be relatively esoteric more relevant and engaging for audiences. From my perspective, classical music is certainly not archaic or dying! However, I know I can do a better job at introducing unfamiliar repertoire to inexperienced listeners. Eine kleine is a fun piece, but there is so much more out there to explore.

3 replies


More entries: October 2012

Facebook Twitter YouTube Instagram Email

Violinist.com is made possible by...

Shar Music
Shar Music

Pirastro Strings
Pirastro Strings

Corilon Violins
Corilon Violins

Los Angeles Philharmonic
Los Angeles Philharmonic

International Violin Competition of Indianapolis
International Violin Competition of Indianapolis

Interlochen Center for the Arts
Interlochen Center for the Arts

Virtual Sejong Music Competition
Virtual Sejong Music Competition

Dimitri Musafia, Master Maker of Violin and Viola Cases
Dimitri Musafia, Master Maker of Violin and Viola Cases

Violinist.com Shopping Guide
Violinist.com Shopping Guide

Metzler Violin Shop

Bein & Company

Bay Fine Strings Violin Shop

Leatherwood Bespoke Rosin

Annapolis Bows & Violins

Los Angeles Violin Shop

String Masters

Bobelock Cases

Things 4 Strings LLC

Violin-Strings.com

Viola-Strings.com

Baerenreiter

Fiddlerman.com

FiddlerShop

Sleepy Puppy Press

Jargar Strings

J.R. Judd Violins, LLC

Southwest Strings

Nazareth Gevorkian Violins

Laurie's Books

Discover the best of Violinist.com in these collections of editor Laurie Niles' exclusive interviews.

Violinist.com Interviews Volume 1
Violinist.com Interviews Volume 1, with introduction by Hilary Hahn

Violinist.com Interviews Volume 2
Violinist.com Interviews Volume 2, with introduction by Rachel Barton Pine

Subscribe