March 2009

YouTube Symphony Orchestra Winners

March 6, 2009 10:17

I thought I'd begin a post on behalf of the violin section for the first ever YouTube Symphony Orchestra concert at Carnegie Hall on April 15th.

I feel very honored to have been selected as one of the violinists to play at Carnegie Hall as a member of the YouTube Symphony Orchestra under the direction of Michael Tilson Thomas of the New World Symphony. Laurie Niles encouraged me to post a thread on this site to bring awareness to this event and to share a couple of thoughts going through my head.

I started my YouTube channel in Oct 2007 with one simple motivation: to use the power of the Internet to inspire people of all ages and walks of life to learn and appreciate good music. At first, I helped individual people one-on-one, and as I gained momentum I began creating more generalized videos for public consumption. There was no "magic bullet" to growing my channel; it just sort of happened as I continued to freely give of my time and energies toward the betterment of others. My teaching method encourages people to embrace all types of music, including video game, anime, pop, etc., which in turn fulfills people emotionally in a way that other types of media simply cannot do. A direct result of my efforts has been a significant improvement in my own playing ability.

As the Music Chair of Woogi World (www.WoogiWorld.com), a virtual website dedicated to the education and safety of children K-6th grade, I've created the first ever Online Music Club where more than 10,000 kids (and growing) go to play music games that teach the fundamentals of music as well as learn the Melodica instrument through online instructional videos that I am creating for them. Since its official launch in 2008, Woogi World has more than 500,000 individual accounts and continues to gain momentum and prove to parents worldwide that the Internet can be a safe and educational tool for kids. I am the highest music authority of this cutting-edge website and also do a large portion of its back- and front-end programming as my full-time day job.

I believe that as a result of my participation with the YouTube Symphony Orchestra, I will be able to give young people across Woogi World, YouTube, and my personal website ChamberHymns (www.ChamberHymns.com) a chance to experience, by proxy, a part of what I will be experiencing. I want to prove to them that through hard work and dedication, great things are possible, and that music is a dying art that needs the next generation's full support. By bringing this and other musical experiences back to these websites with whom I am affiliated, I hope to further enrich the kids' learning experiences and motivate them to continue practicing daily and sharing their musical talents with those around them.

Anyways, I hope all of that made sense :) I'm happy to respond to your comments and questions as I have the time!

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