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Emily Grossman

mm = 109-113

April 17, 2006 at 11:02 PM

It occurred to me today that when it comes to tempos, we simply don’t do enough practice involving the prime numbers. Is it possible that by clinging to multiples of five (or fours) when picking metronome speeds, our cognitive paths have developed ruts of mundanity? Could I be missing some important mental epiphany by doing so?

I charted all the prime numbers up to 1,319 by color-coding the various multiples (which, as a byproduct, also creates a nifty pattern for a potential future quilting project). From now on, we will be using only prime numbers when specifying tempos. We feel pretty good about this decision.


From Karin Lin
Posted on April 17, 2006 at 11:45 PM
Who's this "we"? My metronome has plenty of prime numbers on it. By the way, what you did is known as the Sieve of Eratosthenes. Never thought of it as a quilting pattern, though!
From Emily Grossman
Posted on April 18, 2006 at 12:10 AM
Ah, I see I'm the only one who has been chained to an obsession with twos and fives. It only took me this long to see my other options.
From Terez Mertes
Posted on April 18, 2006 at 3:02 AM
Oh, someone has REALLY got spring fever and needs to get all that energy out of the house. : )
From Keith J.
Posted on April 18, 2006 at 4:52 AM
is husband jealous of the attention slathered on metronome yet?
From Carley Anderson
Posted on April 18, 2006 at 12:33 PM
*eyes are crossed*


....


*passes out*

....


Even EPT* can't decipher this one.

*See this.

From Linda Lerskier
Posted on April 18, 2006 at 2:52 PM
*cough* You tis need mental help.
From Neil Cameron
Posted on April 18, 2006 at 3:29 PM
Really all I can say to this is 6 and 8.

Neil

From Pauline Lerner
Posted on April 18, 2006 at 7:16 PM
I can't stand the metronome and never use one. In fact, I managed to lose mine, along with my mutes, which I also can't stand. I like your quilt pattern.
From bill _
Posted on April 19, 2006 at 5:33 PM
Heifetz was a human metronome

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