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Jasmine Reese

What a Dream...

January 24, 2008 at 11:57 PM

I moved to a new dorm with my Japanese friend Megumi because my old roommate and I could live together due tot he fact that I was allergic to her and she was allergic to me. Literally, we would sneeze in eachother's presence all the time.

So, last night, in my new dorm, I had a fascinating dream.

I woke up. I walked over to the music building. I took my violin out of "his" locker and went to practice. When I began to play, something did not seem right. I sounded good. Really good. Like Milstein good. Like Anne-Sophie Mutter good. Like Sarah Chang good. Like Ricci good. You get the point.

My eyes widened in amazement. I feared that if I stopped playing, my new amazing sound would disappear. So, I kept playing no matter where I went. I walked out of the practice room down to my teacher's house and played for her. She was amazed, of course. Then she drove me to Eastman to show some of her friends my newfound talent. I did not stop playing; I continued to play even when I was in the front seat of the car. I never tired or ached. My energy was amazing. Many years passed, and I was known as "The Violinist Who Never Tires." I was about 30 years old and pretty with a nice 36 24 36 figure (At this point I was aware this was just a dream).

One day, as I played my violin in the grocery store, a man walked up to me and told me to shutup. I ignored him even as the steam was coming off his face. I noticed him, how could I not with those chiseled features and (sigh)...

Everyday, this man would come to my house or wherever and tell me to shutup. I started to fall in love with him. Since it was my dream, I made him fall in love with me, too.

One night, as we ate dinner at a restaurant, and I played my violin, he said, "Jasmine, we cannot get married and you continue playing that violin 24/7. You're going to have to make a sacrifice." I did not say anything, I just continued to play the Tchaikovsy. He rose out of his seat and began to walk away. I knew he was leaving and would never come back. So, I stopped playing. Everyone stopped chewing and stared at me. Someone started to dial the news station. BBC, CNN, New York Times, so on and so forth all arrived and stared at the woman who had been playing the violin 11 years straight, sitting silently as the table glancing at her love.

My man came back tot he table and sat down next to me and smiled.

And then, I ignited into flames.

Moral of the dream: Do not fall in love. Or do not become too attached to the violin. It could be either one.

Jazzy


From Tom Holzman
Posted on January 25, 2008 at 1:57 AM
Interesting dream. Moral: be sure to have some fun in addition to being violin-obsessed.
From Royce Faina
Posted on January 25, 2008 at 6:27 PM
I hope that when I grow up I'll have a 36 24 36 figure also!
From Jim W. Miller
Posted on January 26, 2008 at 4:38 AM
Dreams are easy to interpret and the messages are real. I had a recurring dream over a couple years. It had a nightmarish slant, to help get my attention. I finally understood what it meant, and tracked down some information, and haven't had the dream in years. It's like your subconscious telling you things, things about yourself or in my case things I needed to find out to progress a certain way. The language is totally symbolic, a very interesting phenomenon, but easy to interpret and understand.
From Jasmine Reese
Posted on January 26, 2008 at 8:04 PM
Of course, I totally agree, Jim. Your brain stores information, especially emotional information that directly effects or affects you. So at night when you are sleeping that information comes out in the weirdest way. Especially when it comes to subjects that are pricking are Conscience. If we've been a bad boy boy or girl, our conscience will certainly tell us in our dreams/nightmares.
From Jasmine Reese
Posted on January 26, 2008 at 8:08 PM
Also, dreams hold information from our past, containing memories that maybe we forgot about when we were younger.
Such as instances when an adult will all of the sudden remember or dream about a time when he or she was younger, and he or she had been molested, but they forgot. Psychologists study these types of cases all the time.

My dream above, I had because I am always worried about my future with violin, and also I was talking to my roommate about marriage and whatnot. I said, "I do not want to get married." So in the dream, when I stopped the violin for a man, my statement must have been true that I did not want to get married because I burst into flames.

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