Finger Patterns IV (Hand Model)

October 27, 2019, 2:54 PM · I hope to engage violinists on “finger patterns” as I prepare a neuroscience and wearable research project. I will bring to light literature on the hand, motor control, and observation techniques, which extend your expertise as performers, teachers, and composers.

There are some startling things at work in violin performance related with asymmetries in the finger and finger patterns.

How to advance the art of violin performance will mean using violin knowledge extended by other disciplines: biomechanics, neurophysiology, acoustics and what I call extra-music a systematic exploration of plasticity in the hand and pre-motor aspects of performing. Where performance happens occurs at levels beyond note production. What one hears is last step in a very fast process.

The hand is quicker than the eye. The plasticity of the hand and shaping the neuromotor programming are open for exploration.

One goal I have is to improve our understanding of “paired-fingers “evident in finger pattern and position shifts. Finger patterns known to this community take on a new meaning when one translates research on plasticity and biomechanics to finger patterns.

Keep in mind the 3 primary colors (childhood) lead to millions of colors (Photoshop). The case of finger patterns in earlier blogs looks a finger patterns to produce musical results. From a performance perspective finger patterns employ several disciplines: biomechanics, acoustics, and music conventions to organize the utility of finger patterns.

My research responds to recent research from a dissertation by a student of Kurt Sassmannshaus. My target audience branches toward acoustics (Catgut Society), pedagogy, neuroscience and new forms of biological-technology based upon the expertise of bowed instrument performance.

My ideas build upon the research literature on violin performance: Altenmue?ller, Guettler, Kazennikov, Schoonderwaldt Wiesendanger, Woodhouse, Visentin and the literature on perception and action. On the other hand my methods reflect attempts to use sensors or motion capture to study performance.

In general I look at performance as a performer with knowledge of the biology at work under the skin.

I am not a violinist. I was active as a new music flutist with knowledge of both extremes of the repertoire. Arditti-Platz catalogue on extended violin technique is useful. As a flutist, clinician (Autism and Trauma), and developmental scientist I recognize the unique role of bowed string performance unlike guitar, harp, or piano (each with some degree of a vibrating string). What I lack in direct knowledge of violin I extend by asking questions outside the box. I consider several things:

the demand of the instrument on the instrumentalist, the demand of the instrumentalist’s neurophysiology on the instrument-instrumentalist exchange, and the demand of the instructions (score) on the instrumentalist’s cognition.

Accordingly, the problems discussed in Finger Pattern postings would benefit from seeing violin playing as performance in a crowded space requiring interdisciplinary discussion.

I look forward to building upon this blog and receiving your feedback.



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